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Angela Carter‘s Exposure of Flesh-Inscribed Stereotypes
Mariaconcetta Costantini

The human body is a crucial site for the inscription of cultural paradigms: how people are perceived controls the way they are treated. Postmodernist writers have shown sexual roles, racial inequalities and other forms of discrimination to be parts of a process of reductio ad absurdum, consisting of the identification of the individual‘s social functions with their anatomical features as well as with the habitual marking of their bodies. This article examines Angela Carter‘s The Infernal Desire Machines of Doctor Hoffman where Carter‘s refusal of established body politics is most clearly dramatised. This novel exposes the dreary consequences of power/weakness relations, together with its contradictory exploitation of Gothic devices, making it an esssential testimony to Carter‘s postmodernist reconfiguration of worldviews and narrative modes.

Gothic Studies
Rebecca Munford

of erotic and deathly enthralment, subject to the bloody ‘prick’ of male punishment and violation without end. 5 While Carter confronts the deadly boundaries of the Sadeian body/corpus in The Sadeian Woman, Sadeian inflections of ‘Sleeping Beauty’ reappear through her fiction, most strikingly in The Infernal Desire Machines of Doctor Hoffman and The Bloody Chamber. These Gothic

in Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers
Carter’s ambivalent cinematic fiction and the problem of proximity
Marie Mulvey-Roberts

invested in them by spectators. Knowing that an image is not real is not enough to transform spectators into radical subjects since it leaves untouched their desires.7 This chapter, therefore, looks at how Carter takes cinematic illusions seriously, and shows that it is by pushing such illusions to their logical extreme that her texts arrive at a more robust critique – a critique not just of cinema but of desire.8 It focuses on two of her 226 The arts of Angela Carter most cinematic novels, The Infernal Desire Machines of Doctor Hoffman ([1972] 2010) and The Passion

in The arts of Angela Carter
Religion, misogyny, myth and the cult
Marie Mulvey-Roberts

stories demystifying the Fall, and another re-evaluating the representation of Mary Magdalene in European art. She also produced an iconoclastic film on the life of Christ through painting called The Holy Family Album (1991) and satirized religious practice from medieval Catholicism in The Infernal Desire Machines of Doctor Hoffman (1972) to that of a modern Messiah in The Passion of New Eve (1977), via a re-imagining of Charles Manson’s infamous sex cult, responsible for the brutal murder of the film actress Sharon Tate, discussed in detail here for the first time

in The arts of Angela Carter
Angela Carter and Claude Lévi-Strauss
Marie Mulvey-Roberts

backward or retarded people; indeed it may possess, in one realm or another, a genius for invention or action that leaves the achievements of civilized peoples far behind’ (1963: 102). Carter’s work similarly shows a keen interest in ‘primitive’ or ‘savage’ communities, from her portrayal of the Barbarians in Heroes and Villains (1969) to the South American River People in The Infernal Desire Machines of Doctor Hoffman (1972). What is more, like LéviStrauss, Carter is pre-occupied with the power of mythology. LéviStrauss argues that in a primitive context, ‘myths operate

in The arts of Angela Carter
Abstract only
Angela Carter’s curious rooms
Marie Mulvey-Roberts

short by her own untimely death.13 That episode in Carter’s life remained inscrutable until Gordon made the trip himself and when Natsumi Ikoma translated the Japanese memoir written by Sozo. One trusts that the author of Introduction: Angela Carter’s curious rooms 7 The Sadeian Woman would have been tolerant of voyeurs reading about her experience of love hotels in Tokyo. The city is reimagined in her surrealist novel, The Infernal Desire Machines of Doctor Hoffman (1972), though its initial description indicates that she had merged it with Bristol, a blurring

in The arts of Angela Carter
From Baudelaire to Black Venus
Marie Mulvey-Roberts

98 The arts of Angela Carter 5 Angela Carter’s objets trouvés in translation: from Baudelaire to Black Venus Martine Hennard Dutheil de la Rochère Translating someone else’s writing can be a way of easing oneself back into one’s poetry, using the other writer’s work as a point of inspiration. (Bassnett, 2011: 166) A n enthusiastic, if slightly baffled, review of The Infernal Desire Machines of Doctor Hoffman aka The War of Dreams (1972), published 14 August 1974 in Kirkus Reviews, stresses the translated character of Angela Carter’s surrealist

in The arts of Angela Carter
Performance and puppet theatre in Angela Carter’s Japan
Marie Mulvey-Roberts

that has received considerable attention in literary reviews, indicating that we have much to learn from this relatively unknown period in Carter’s life. Described by Max Liu as the place where Carter ‘found the settings for some of her best stories’ (2016), representations of Japan are littered throughout Carter’s short stories, essays, and the one novel she wrote during her time abroad: the illusionary city ‘full of mirages’ (3), which appears in the first chapter of The Infernal Desire Machines of Doctor Hoffman (1972) is clearly a ‘dream-version of Tokyo’ (Gordon

in The arts of Angela Carter
Abstract only
Angela Carter and European Gothic
Rebecca Munford

through much of Carter’s fiction – from her Gothic reworking of fairy tales in The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories to the quotation from Sade that mysteriously appears in Desiderio’s pocket in The Infernal Desire Machines of Doctor Hoffman ( 1972 ). Carter’s unpublished reading journals and notebooks are similarly shot through with commentary on and translated lines from Sade’s work. In an interview with Janet

in Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers
Matthew Lewis’s The Monk and the Marquis de Sade’s La Nouvelle Justine
Angela Wright

Infernal Desire Machines of Doctor Hoffman , Harmondsworth , Penguin [1972]. Cazotte , J. ( 1772 ) Le Diable amoureux. Nouvelle espagnole , Naples and Paris , n.p . Clery , E.J. ( 1994 ) ‘Ann Radcliffe and D.A.F. de Sade: thoughts on heroinism’ , Women’s Writing , 1 : 2 . Diderot , D

in European Gothic