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Quentin Falk

Chapter 8 follows Charles Crichton’s career through the second half of the sixties. He made only one feature film during this period, the thriller He Who Rides a Tiger (1965). Based on the experiences of cat burglar Peter Gulston (aka Peter Scott), the film was written by Trevor Peacock and starred Tom Bell and Judi Dench. The production was plagued by money problems and the erratic behaviour of producer David Newman, and the reviews were mixed. It would be more than two decades before Crichton directed another feature. The subsequent years were filled with TV work, notably on The Avengers, Man in a Suitcase and The Strange Report. There was, however, a suggestion of things to come when Crichton was briefly considered as director for a project being developed by future Monty Python’s Flying Circus stars John Cleese and Graham Chapman. The film, then titled Rentasleuth, went ahead without him, appearing in 1972 under the title Rentadick. It was a total flop, but the short-lived collaboration between Crichton, Cleese and Chapman would go on to bear fruit almost twenty years later with A Fish Called Wanda.

in Charles Crichton
Quentin Falk

and white thrillers’  45 slightly to one side of the mainstream in the early sixties, like Bryan Forbes’s Séance on a Wet Afternoon (1964), John Guillermin’s Raptur e (1965), Polanski’s Repulsion (1965) and, he might also have added, Preminger’s Bunny Lake Is Missing (1965), most of them reflecting different aspects of mental illness. These are films, which Robert Murphy, like Sinyard, believed contrasted strangely even starkly with what seemed to be the prevailing mood at the time in a Britain where Beatlemania was rampant, Bond had been unleashed and the

in Charles Crichton
Chiharu Yoshioka

The Gothic is the discourse which embodies the dialectic of the Enlightenment, with its potential to push the frontier of reason into the mythologized darkness. Embarking on the use of genre fiction as political discourse and finding a voice to tell a story of her generation, Carter made a major breakthrough in her career. Making use of the Gothic palimpsest, Carters Marianne leaves behind the sphere of (feminine) ‘interiority’-the psychic spaces of desire and anxiety for the (supposedly masculine) catharsis in the Other world, as a sixties heroine of sensibility. Heroes and Villains calls for the reconstruction of enlightenment at the ‘post-modern’ ruins of civilization.

Gothic Studies
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A lived religious history of English Catholicism, 1945–82
Author: Alana Harris

Drawing upon a multi-disciplinary methodology employing diverse written sources, material practices and vivid life histories, Faith in the Family seeks to assess the impact of the Second Vatican Council on the ordinary believer, alongside contemporaneous shifts in British society relating to social mobility, the sixties, sexual morality, and secularisation. Chapters examine the changes in the Roman Catholic liturgy and Christology, devotion to Mary, the rosary and the place of women in the family and church, as well as the enduring (but shifting) popularity of Saints Bernadette and Thérèse.

Appealing to students of modern British gender and cultural history, as well as a general readership interested in religious life in Britain in the second half of the twentieth century, Faith in the Family illustrates that despite unmistakable differences in their cultural accoutrements and interpretations of Catholicism, English Catholics continued to identify with and practise the ‘Faith of Our Fathers’ before and after Vatican II.

Emmanuelle Strub

, given that in 2012 MdM had a presence on every continent, in some forty countries, with 136 international and 1,700 national employees. At headquarters they had fourteen desk managers to oversee the sixty-five projects. In addition, I was unclear about my role. I had practically no support, though the scope of my job was enormous, from strengthening the overall security framework to providing operational support at one of multiple field projects. What was expected

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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Laurence Coupe

Coupe 06 22/3/07 01:14 Page 207 Postscript I trust that, as this study comes to a close, readers will feel able to concur with me that, once one has recognised the ‘Beat’ vision as the ‘beatific’ vision, the relationship between the fifties writers and the sixties songwriters becomes rather more intriguing than it would be if we relied on some vague notion of a bohemian legacy. Once one takes Beats such as Kerouac, Ginsberg and Snyder seriously as religious writers, exploring possibilities of spirituality with a view to mystical revelation, the achievement

in Beat sound, Beat vision
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Claire Hines

This is a remark that Playboy has revisited over the years to underline the strength of its association with the Bond character; it would also suggest that Fleming himself understood the potential of the bond between them early on. Among other things that James Bond and Playboy have in common is the fact that they are both strongly associated with the sixties, having launched at about the same time in 1953, and remarkably they are still around over sixty years later. During the 1960s in particular, the print and screen versions of Bond made frequent appearances in

in The playboy and James Bond
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Claire Hines

6 The bond beyond Since the November 1965 issue, Playboy magazine has maintained some strong connections to James Bond, albeit in changing cultural circumstances. Though the social and cultural landscape of Britain and America has changed dramatically since the sixties, the use of the Bond and Playboy formulas has largely endured, and for the most part the relations established between them continue over fifty years later. However, this does not mean there have not been some necessary adjustments, especially since critics and commentators have long speculated

in The playboy and James Bond
Rachel Hammersley

12 The Cordeliers Club and the 1 ­democratisation of English republican ideas Introduction The Cordeliers Club, which was established in the spring of 1790, grew out of the Cordeliers District – one of the sixty electoral districts of Paris that had been created to facilitate the elections to the Estates-General.2 It was one of the most radical of the revolutionary political clubs. The official title of the Club was the Société des amis des droits de l’homme et du citoyen, and the Cordeliers presented themselves as intent on ensuring that the radical promises

in The English republican tradition and eighteenth-century France
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Tom Gallagher

triple gallows on an open-top van, with a sign reading ‘Troika’ – in reference to the austerity inspectors from the European Union, the IMF and the European Central Bank. An officer from each of the services – police, coast guard and firefighters – then stood with his head in a noose. 6 This book explores why the boldest initiative in the sixty-year quest to achieve a borderless Europe has exploded in the face of the EU. A close examination of each stage of the EU financial emergency offers evidence that the European values that are supposed to provide solidarity

in Europe’s path to crisis