Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 253 items for :

  • "The Balcony" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Spectacle, allegory and the wound of theatre
Carl Lavery

The historical materialist leaves it to others to be drained by the whore called ‘Once upon a time’ in historicism’s bordello. He remains in control of his powers, man enough to blast open the continuum of history. (Benjamin, 1969 : 262) Introduction Published in 1956, and revised on three occasions in 1960, 1962 and 1968, The Balcony is the first of Genet’s plays to take contemporary historical and political reality as its major theme. Whereas his early work, most notably the novel Funeral Rites , dealt with history indirectly, without being

in The politics of Jean Genet’s late theatre
Spaces of revolution
Author: Carl Lavery

Jean Genet has long been regarded as one of the most influential artists of the twentieth century. Since the publication of Jean-Paul Sartre's existential biography Saint Genet: Actor and Martyr in 1952, his writing has attracted the attention of leading French thinkers and philosophers. In the UK and US, his work has played a major role in the development of queer and feminist studies, where his representation of sexuality and gender continues to provoke controversy. This book aims to argue for Genet's influence once again, but it does so by focusing uniquely on the politics of his late theatre. The first part of the book explores the relationship between politics and aesthetics in Genet's theatre and political writing in the period 1955 to 1986. The second part focuses on the spatial politics of The Balcony, The Blacks and The Screens by historicising them within the processes of modernisation and decolonisation in France of the 1950s and 1960s. The third part of the book analyses how Genet's radical spatiality works in practice by interviewing key contemporary practitioners, Lluís Pasqual, JoAnne Akalaitis, and Ultz and Excalibah. The rationale behind these interviews is to find a way of merging past and present. The rationale so explores why Genet's late theatre, although firmly rooted within its own political and historical landscape, retains its relevance for practitioners working within different geographical and historical contexts today.

Abstract only
The event of the wound
Carl Lavery

his concept of revolution is prefigured in the themes and forms of his late plays. In this chapter, I backtrack a little by attempting to account for the critical aesthetico-political shift that occurred in his theatre from The Balcony onwards. Appropriating a word from Sartre, I locate this ‘metamorphosis’ within Genet’s work as a whole ( 1988 : 1), before attempting to think through the reasons behind it by focusing on both historical and personal experience. Special attention is given to a painful existential event that Genet recounts undergoing in the early

in The politics of Jean Genet’s late theatre
Carl Lavery

Llu’s Pasqual is one of Europe’s foremost theatre and opera directors. He is best known for his dazzling collaborations with the designer Fabià Puigserver, with whom he reinvented classic Spanish and European plays for contemporary audiences in Catalonia and elsewhere from the mid-1970s onwards. This interview deals with Pasqual’s productions of The Balcony in 1980 and 1981 before going on to explore where Genet’s contemporary significance resides. CARL LAVERY : How did you become interested in Genet’s work? LLUÍS PASQUAL : I was drawn to Genet for

in The politics of Jean Genet’s late theatre
Carl Lavery

JoAnne Akalaitis is a US theatre director and founder of the influential avant-garde theatre company Mabou Mines. In this interview, I talk to her about her two widely praised productions of Genet’s work, The Balcony with the American Repertory Theatre in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1985–86, and The Screens at the Tyrone Guthrie Theatre, Minneapolis in 1989–90. CARL LAVERY: The first question I want to ask you is how did you get into Genet? JOANNE AKALAITIS: I happened to catch a production of The Maids , and it just amazed me. I thought it was

in The politics of Jean Genet’s late theatre
Eugene Pooley

, an agora, a forum: a world’. Thus the arengario would be the platform from which the Duce would be able to dominate his ‘world’.35 By 1933, the arengario, as an architectural feature, had become wholly symbolic of Mussolini’s dominant presence.36 Throughout Italy, from the appropriation of the balcony of Palazzo Venezia to the erection of temporary platforms for speeches, it was used to stage the Duce–popolo (people) relationship in its most dramatic, imaginative and enduring manner. Yet it also came to be viewed as a mark of the changing nature of the cult, with

in The cult of the Duce
Introduction
Carl Lavery

EDWARD DE GRAZIA : I found that the possibility – or threat – of revolution, permeates your plays more than your novels; there’s a possibility, or threat of revolution or insurrection in The Maids , for example; there’s a revolution going on in The Balcony , and The Blacks contains a threat of revolution. Does this mean that you are in favour of great changes in the relationships between classes and between people? JEAN GENET : No! It just means that you fear revolution (because you said you’d felt it as a threat), whereas I see it as a hope! (de

in The politics of Jean Genet’s late theatre
Jonathan Chatwin

? (‘Jade Flower Palace’ by Du Fu, 757 AD, author’s translation). Stand on Tiananmen Square, just behind the flagpole which flies the national flag, looking north. In front of you, Long Peace Street conveys an endless stream of cars, taxis and buses, blurred as they speed across from west to east, east to west. Beyond that, the flat red walls of the Gate of Heavenly Peace rise to meet a falling sweep of yellow tiles at the balcony from which Mao Zedong announced the founding of the People’s Republic in October

in Long Peace Street
Open Access (free)
The Algerian war and the ‘emancipation’ of Muslim women, 1954–62
Author: Neil Macmaster

In May 1958, and four years into the Algerian War of Independence, a revolt again appropriated the revolutionary and republican symbolism of the French Revolution by seizing power through a Committee of Public Safety. This book explores why a repressive colonial system that had for over a century maintained the material and intellectual backwardness of Algerian women now turned to an extensive programme of 'emancipation'. After a brief background sketch of the situation of Algerian women during the post-war decade, it discusses the various factors contributed to the emergence of the first significant women's organisations in the main urban centres. It was only after the outbreak of the rebellion in 1954 and the arrival of many hundreds of wives of army officers that the model of female interventionism became dramatically activated. The French military intervention in Algeria during 1954-1962 derived its force from the Orientalist current in European colonialism and also seemed to foreshadow the revival of global Islamophobia after 1979 and the eventual moves to 'liberate' Muslim societies by US-led neo-imperialism in Afghanistan and Iraq. For the women of Bordj Okhriss, as throughout Algeria, the French army represented a dangerous and powerful force associated with mass destruction, brutality and rape. The central contradiction facing the mobile socio-medical teams teams was how to gain the trust of Algerian women and to bring them social progress and emancipation when they themselves were part of an army that had destroyed their villages and driven them into refugee camps.

Abstract only
Staging the wound
Carl Lavery

’s strident rejection of commitment is read as a refusal, on his part, to endorse any form of political art whatsoever, which doubtless explains why so many commentators, interested in the politics of his theatre, have wanted to ‘save him from himself’ (Coe, 1968 : 314–15). However, things are not so straightforward. Although Genet could say in ‘The Avertissement’ to the 1960 edition of The Balcony , that poetry which puts itself in the service of a cause ‘always destroys its pretext’ ( 1991 : xiv), at no point does he ever reject the politics of poetry per se. A more

in The politics of Jean Genet’s late theatre