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Global white nationalism is a path-breaking transnational history of white nationalism in the English-speaking world from the post-World War II period to the present. Nine chapters from leading experts in the histories of Australia, Britain, southern Africa, and the United States explore the roots of the contemporary resurgence of white supremacy evident in terrorist violence and electoral gains by the racist right. After 1945, this book shows, white nationalism emerged across the English-speaking world as a response to the forces of decolonization, civil rights, mass migration, and the rise of international institutions such as the United Nations. Far from a disappearing ideology, white supremacy proved resilient and adaptive. As opposition to apartheid rallied anti-racists globally, apartheid and Rhodesian independence sustained white nationalists who fantasized about bygone eras of imperial British or American greatness. In the era of decolonization and civil rights, white nationalists—those on the far right and those closer to the mainstream of conservative politics—formed key connections with counterparts throughout the world. Uncovering this transnational history for the first time, Global white nationalism is essential to understanding white nationalism today.

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Music, radicalism and reform in the Anglophone world, 1790–1914

Throughout the long nineteenth-century the sounds of liberty resonated across the Anglophone world. Focusing on radicals and reformers committed to the struggle for a better future, this book explores the role of music in the transmission of political culture over time and distance. The book examines iconic songs; the sound of music as radicals and reformers were marching, electioneering, celebrating, commemorating as well as striking, rioting and rebelling. Following the footsteps of relentlessly travelling activists, it brings to light the importance of music-making in the lived experience of politics. The book argues that music and music-making are highly effective lens for investigating the inter-colonial and transnational history of radicalism and reform between 1790 and 1914. It offers glimpses of indigenous agency, appropriation, adaptation and resistance by those who used the musical culture of the white colonisers. Hymn-singing was an intrinsic part of life in Victorian Britain and her colonies and those hymns are often associated with conservatism, if not reaction. The book highlights how music encouraged, unified, divided, consoled, reminded, inspired and, at times, oppressed, providing an opportunity to hear history as it happened. The examples presented show that music was dialogic – mediating the relationship between leader and led; revealing the ways that song moved in and out of daily exchange, the way it encouraged, unified, attacked, divided, consoled, and constructed. The study provides a wealth of evidence to suggest that the edifice of 'Australian exceptionalism', as it applies to radicals and reformers, is crumbling.

Peace, progress and prestige
Author: Daniel Laqua

This study investigates internationalism through the prism of a small European country. It explores an age in which many groups and communities – from socialists to scientists – organised themselves across national borders. Belgium was a major hub for transnational movements. By taking this small and yet significant European country as a focal point, the book critically examines major historical issues, including nationalism, colonial expansion, political activism and international relations. A main aim is to reveal the multifarious and sometimes contradictory nature of internationalism. The Belgian case shows how within one particular country, different forms of internationalism sometimes clashed and sometimes converged.

The book is organised around political movements and intellectual currents that had a strong presence in Belgium. Each of the main chapters is dedicated to a key theme in European history: nationhood, empire, the relationship between church and state, political and social equality, peace, and universalism. The timeframe ranges from the fin de siècle to the interwar years. It thus covers the rise of international associations before the First World War, the impact of the conflagration of 1914, and the emergence of new actors such as the League of Nations.

With its discussion of campaigns and activities that ranged beyond the nation-state, this study is instructive for anyone interested in transnational approaches to history.

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Games within games
Editor: J. Simon Rofe

The purpose of this book is to critically enhance the appreciation of diplomacy and sport in global affairs from the perspective of practitioners and scholars. The book will make an important new contribution to at least two distinct fields: diplomacy and sport, as well as to those concerned with history, politics, sociology and international relations. The critical analysis the book provides explores the linkages across these fields, particularly in relation to soft power and public diplomacy, and is supported by a wide range of sources and methodologies. The book draws in a range of scholars across these different fields, and includes esteemed FIFA scholar Professor Alan Tomlinson. Tomlinson addresses diplomacy within the world’s global game of Association Football, while other subjects include the rise of mega-sport events as sites of diplomacy, new consideration of Chinese ping-pong diplomacy prior to the 1970s and the importance of boycotts in sport – particularly in relation to newly explored dimensions of the boycotts of the 1980 and 1984 Olympic Games. The place of non-state actors is explored throughout: be they individual or institutions they perform a crucial role as conduits of the transactions of sport and diplomacy. Based on twentieth- and twenty-first-century evidence, the book acknowledges antecedents from the ancient Olympics to the contemporary era, and in its conclusions offers avenues for further study based on the future sport and diplomacy relationship. The book has a strong international basis because it covers a broad range of countries, their diplomatic relationship with sport and is written by a truly transnational cast of authors. The intense media scrutiny of the Olympic Games, FIFA World Cup and other international sports will also contribute to the global interest in this volume.

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A transnational approach to co-operative history
Mary Hilson

-operators as well, and after 1918 they devoted much time to the question of how to apply co-operative principles to the re-organisation of trade, not only locally and nationally but also internationally. This book is concerned with the transnational history of co-operation, an area which has hitherto been relatively little researched.4 From its beginnings co-operation was shaped by the transfer and exchange of ideas across national boundaries, and from 1895 it also had its own international organisation, the International Co-operative Alliance (ICA). The book focuses on co

A programme for the teaching of history in the post- national era
Thomas Adam

teaching that connects the current global experiences of students with past events and provides explanations for the challenges of our time. The most prominent way to reconfigure our historical knowledge and its presentation is offered by the approach of Transnational History. Transnational History emerged since the early 1990s as a counter-model to the paradigm of national history. It is focused on the circulation of ideas, concepts, and practices across various cultures and societies. Rather than seeing history as a function of nation states and only in its national

in The TransAtlantic reconsidered
Parvati Nair and Julián Daniel Gutiérrez-Albilla

Part III Migration, transnationalism and borders Implicit in the very idea of bringing together the work of women filmmakers from Hispanic and Lusophone contexts is the notion that these cultural categories must necessarily be viewed in terms of their migratory and transnational histories. This is so simply by dint of the vast geographical and geopolitical spaces and networks that constitute the Hispanic

in Hispanic and Lusophone women filmmakers
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James Keating

, ‘Australian women’s metropolitan activism’, pp. 207–22; Woollacott, ‘Inventing Commonwealth and pan-Pacific feminisms’, 425–48. 16 H. Roberts, ‘Jessie Mackay’, Te Ara: the Encyclopedia of New Zealand , http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/en/biographies/2m15/mackay-jessie (accessed 7 December 2018). 17 Time and Tide , 10 December 1920, p. 631; 15 July 1921, p. 679. 18 Zimmermann, ‘Feminist inter/national politics’, 107. 19 See, for example, Bush and Purvis (eds), ‘Connecting women’s histories’; Midgley et al. (eds), Women in Transnational History . 20 Grimshaw

in Distant Sisters
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Leading the empire, leading the world?
James Keating

British colonies: New South Wales, New Zealand, and South Australia. Sheppard and Goldstein’s compatriots did not always realise their lofty ambitions. Still, in revealing the fragility of international connections, their stories enrich the scholarship on transnational organising that has energised feminist history since the 1990s. For all its insights, this project remains preoccupied with successful endeavours. 17 Belying the promise of transnational history, subjects from the transatlantic centre still eclipse women at the margins. As Ellen Carol DuBois observed

in Distant Sisters
Transnational resistance in Europe, 1936–48
Editors: Robert Gildea and Ismee Tames

This work demonstrates that resistance to occupation by Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy during the Second World War has to be seen through a transnational, not a national, lens. It explores how people often resisted outside their country of origin because they were migrants, refugees or exiles who were already on the move. It traces their trajectories and encounters with other resisters and explores their experiences, including changes of beliefs, practices and identities. The book is a powerful, subtle and thought-provoking alternative to works on the Second World War that focus on single countries or on grand strategy. It is a ‘bottom up’ story of extraordinary individuals and groups who resisted oppression from Spain to the Soviet Union and the Balkans. It challenges the standard chronology of the war, beginning with the formation of the International Brigades in Spain and following through to the onset of the Cold War and the foundation of the state of Israel. This is a collective project by a team of international historians led by Robert Gildea, author of Fighters in the Shadows: A New History of the French Resistance (Faber & Faber, 2015). These have explored archives across Europe, the USA, Russia and Israel in order to unearth scores of fascinating individual stories which are woven together into themed chapters and a powerful new interpretation. The book is aimed at undergraduates and graduates working on twentieth-century Europe and the Second World War or interested in the possibilities of transnational history.