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This volume considers transnational and intercultural aspects of early modern theatre, drama and performance. Its twelve chapters, loosely cosmographically grouped into West, North and South, compose a complex image of early modern theatre connections as a socially, economically, politically and culturally realised tissue of links, networks, influences and paths of exchange. With particular attention to itinerant performers, court festival, and the significant black, Muslim and Jewish impact, they combine disciplines and methods to place Shakespeare and his contemporaries in the wider context of early performance culture in English, Spanish, French, Dutch, German, Czech and Italian speaking Europe. Their shared methodological approach examines transnational connections by linking abstract notions of wider theatre historical significance to concrete historical facts: archaeological findings, archival records, visual artefacts, and textual evidence. Crucial to the volume is this systematic yoking of theories with surviving historical evidence for the performative event – whether as material object, text, performative routine, theatregrams, rituals, festivities, genres, archival evidence or visual documentation. This approach enables it to explore the infinite variety of early modern performance culture by expanding the discourse, questioning the received canon, and rethinking the national restrictions of conventional maps to reveal a theatre that truly is without borders.

The ‘jest unseen’ of love letters in Two Gentlemen of Verona and El perro del

Both Shakespeare’s Two Gentlemen of Verona (c. 1593–94) and Lope de Vega’s El perro del hortelano ( The Dog in the Manger , c. 1613–15) emerge from, and embody in drama, a complex cultural matrix of lazzi and theatergrams taken from romance, novelle and transnational dramatic practices, a parallel emergence that this chapter

in Transnational connections in early modern theatre
Private organizations and governmentality

, institutions, and professional networks that voluntarily took on this role. In doing so, they fulfilled a role that governments could not, and they acted in the name of vital governmental interests. These groups form what we can call the Transnational Transatlantic. Their efforts were behind the creation and perpetuation of a unique political space, an Atlantic Community, as a guiding sign of consensus with which both sides of the ocean could identify. It was also the nucleus for what many perceived to be the future of global governance 9 – the transatlantic core for

in The TransAtlantic reconsidered

5217P GLOBAL JUSTICE-PT/lb.qxd 13/1/09 19:59 Page 196 8 Geographies of transnational solidarity Solidarity is not a matter of altruism. Solidarity comes from the inability to tolerate the affront to our own integrity of passive or active collaboration in the oppression of others, and from the deep recognition of our most expansive self-interest. From the recognition that, like it or not, our liberation is bound up with that of every other being on the planet, and that politically, spiritually, in our heart of hearts we know anything else is unaffordable

in Global justice networks
Childhood visits to Ireland by the second generation in England

3995 Migrations.qxd:text 5/8/13 11:38 Page 17 1 Transnational networks across generations: childhood visits to Ireland by the second generation in England Bronwen Walter Introduction The close entanglements of families spread between Ireland and England are often ignored as transnational links, reflecting the hazy understanding of separate states within the ‘British Isles’ especially outside the Irish Republic. But the significance of these ties was demonstrated by the size of return migration of Irish nationals with their British-born children in the Celtic

in Migrations
Britain, France and the Rhodesian problem, 1965–1969

11 A transnational decolonisation: Britain, France and the Rhodesian problem, 1965–1969 Joanna Warson In 2010, while Francophone Africa was commemorating fifty years of independence, Zimbabwe celebrated a smaller, though by no means less significant, anniversary. 18 April 2010 marked thirty years since the midnight ceremony, attended by Prince Charles and Bob Marley, when the red, green, black and gold flag of Zimbabwe rose for the first time (The Times, 1980, 18 April). It was therefore two decades after the independence of Francophone Africa that white

in Francophone Africa at fifty
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These chapters, which explore early modern theatre and performance transnationally, emerge from the research collective Theater Without Borders (TWB). The group formally established itself in 2005 and 2006 conferences at Kadir Has University in Istanbul, but had had its origins in a series of seminars at American Comparative Literature Association annual

in Transnational connections in early modern theatre
Abstract only

practice-based collaborations between members of the international research initiative Theater Without Borders (TWB), a global collective exploring transnational and intercultural aspects of early modern theatre, drama and performance. 1 Arranged as a map of sorts, it presents twelve chapters, newly invited, researched and written to create this collection, divided into three sections, loosely cosmographically

in Transnational connections in early modern theatre
Playing black in late seventeenth-century France and Spain

used to represent Moorish characters in commedia dell’arte scenarii and Tudor court entertainments alike, not to mention Harlequin’s intriguing black mask – blackface covered a wide array of material practices and already had a long transnational history by 1662. 3 In early modern France, it had been used to represent Moors, Ethiopians and Mozambicans in the theatre of Rouen

in Transnational connections in early modern theatre
Metamorphoses of early modern comedy in eighteenth-century bourgeois theatre

theatrical traditions stemming from the older comedy of travelling companies and their composite, transnational performance genre of Haupt- und Staatsaktionen (literally ‘grand historical state events’). These were tragic plays, involving elevated plots of heroic pomp and circumstance performed in bombastic high baroque style, liberally larded and interspersed with comic business

in Transnational connections in early modern theatre