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Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Nazanin Zadeh-Cummings
and
Lauren Harris

have adverse humanitarian consequences for the civilian population of the DPRK’, it was UNSCR 2397 in 2017 that established humanitarian exemptions. 5 Unilateral sanctions, namely from the United States, have also had a notable impact on the humanitarian sector. US organisations may need to navigate the Office of Foreign Asset Control (OFAC, part of the US Treasury) and Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS, part of US Department of Commerce) licenses, as well as restrictions on travel. Since 2017, American citizens must apply for one-time use special validation

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
José Luís Fiori

the State Department, together with the Pentagon, the CIA and other security and intelligence organs of the US government, as well as the Department of Commerce and the Department of the Treasury. To grasp its importance, it is necessary to distinguish it from the eccentric and unpredictable character of Donald Trump. But it is also necessary to recognise that it would take a character like Trump to bring about such a break from the history and tradition of US foreign policy. From a strictly academic perspective, the new strategy document looks

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The inside history of the Treasury since 1976
Author:

The Treasury is one of Britain’s oldest, most powerful and secretive institutions. But all too frequently it has escaped public scrutiny when it comes to investigating the ups and downs of the UK economy. More often, it is depicted as a saviour, repeatedly rescuing the nation’s finances from the hands of posturing Prime Ministers, powerful special interests, and the combustions of world financial markets. It is a bedrock of government stability in times of crisis.

However, there is another side to the story. The Exchequer, more than any other institution, has shaped modern Britain’s economic system. In between the highs there have been many lows, from botched privatizations to dubious private finance initiatives, from failing to spot the great financial crisis to contributing to ever-growing regional imbalances and economic inequalities.

Davis’s book goes behind the scenes to offer an inside history of the Treasury, in the words of the chancellors, officials and civil servants themselves. It shows the failings as well as the successes, the personalities and the thinking which have shaped Britain’s economy since the 1970s. Based on interviews with over fifty key figures from the last five decades of Treasury life, it offers a fascinating, alternative insight on how and why the UK economy came to function as it does today, and why a paradigm shift and institutional rethink is long overdue.

Neapolitan baroque architecture and sanctity
Author:

In place of linear historicism, this book offers a new approach to architecture by examining the matter of the miracle in relation to baroque architecture through an interrogation of the relationship between architecture and the sacred in the economy of the relic. It considers the Treasury Chapel as the interaction of movement and sanctity in relation to matter and affect, particularly the transport of salvation. The rituals of the Treasury Chapel made visible the new cartographies and choreographies of spiritual authority that fed it and that it espoused and generated. The book focuses on the miracle of San Gennaro, the blood that courses through the chapel and its telling. It focuses on the Renaissance Succorpo chapel below the main altar of Naples Cathedral as the principal precursor to the Treasury Chapel. The book explores how the enclosed aristocratic convent of Santa Patrizia used its relics of St Patricia to vault its enclosure walls and to intervene in the Treasury Chapel, quite beyond its own confines, to secure and extend its own spiritual authority in Naples. It investigates the relationships between silver and salvation activated and opened by the Treasury Chapel's many splendid reliquaries. The book examines the implications of the wider politics of silver from its mining to its sustenance of Spanish monarchy and Spanish rule in Naples to its surfacing in those reliquaries. It addresses the question of how and why silver affords a peculiarly Neapolitan bridge between the brutality of the mines and the saints' whispers in heaven.

Abstract only
The miraculous chance
Helen Hills

coexistence of competition in a perpetual field of interaction that it consolidates identity, produces interiority and engagement. The chapel is part of the flow of blood, particles, processional bodies, and prayers. It does not represent, but engenders and traverses. This book departs from the established reading of the Treasury Chapel of San Gennaro as epitome of the Counter-Reformation chapel. In such accounts, the Chapel itself is missing, or is simply held up as the mirror of a process extraneous to it. The very idea of the ‘Counter-Reformation’ obscures far more

in The matter of miracles
Reckless opportunists gain control
Aeron Davis

Originally Brexit was going to be this book's punchline. It neatly marked the end of forty years of Treasury history, starting with one existential crisis for the institution and ending in another. It also seemed to mark forty years of the rise and fall of Britain's particular neoliberal experiment. The Exchequer had played a vital role in shaping that system, positioned as it had been at the centre of an intellectual and institutional nexus, connecting British elites from Whitehall to the City. But since the referendum, there have been

in Bankruptcy, bubbles and bailouts
Helen Hills

Everything joyful is mobile: music, toys, ice cream circulate through the street. (Walter Benjamin and Asia Lacis, ‘Naples’, 171) The choreography of sanctity A swarming of relics glorified San Gennaro, the Treasury Chapel, and the deputies ( Plates 5 & 7 ). That clustering of saints together with the export and processing of their relics ( Plate 24 , Figs 18, 60, 69) bound the chapel to institutions across the city and laced them in a net of subordination, aspiration, and hope. That mapping of different kinds of space made and remade, makes and

in The matter of miracles
Simon Bulmer
and
Martin Burch

Treasury and the DTI. • Other London-based ministries, which have varying degrees of involvement in EU business. These range from the Home Office, which has been significantly affected by the EU since the Maastricht Treaty, through the Ministry of Defence, whose involvement is more recent, to more peripheral ministries such as the Department for Culture Media and Sport (DCMS). • The ‘territorial’ ministries prior to devolution and subsequent arrangements in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland thereafter. The inner core is covered in this chapter; the other categories

in The Europeanisation of Whitehall
A microeconomists' story
Aeron Davis

The story of today's Treasury starts back in 1976. That was the year when the department suffered the humiliation of a forced IMF bailout. An institutional identity crisis followed. Shock treatment was doled out and changes begun. The arrival of the Thatcher government in 1979 then traumatized the department again and a system overhaul was pursued at several levels. A radically reconfigured Exchequer then played a big part in implementing the new ideas of the 1980s. As this chapter argues, behind the big personalities

in Bankruptcy, bubbles and bailouts