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This book sets the scene for the reinterpretations and explorations of the ways William Shakespeare and his contemporaries worked mythological material on their looms. In Ovid, each text leaves a trace in the others, introducing an enriching leaven that expands the text. Reading Holinshed's efforts to place Samothes or Brutus on England's family tree, one feels sorry for those chroniclers who had to reconcile a variety of founding tales and defend mutable causes. Founding myths need a renowned ancestor; warlike feats; identification with a territory, continuity, purity of blood; and someone to tell the story: fame must be recorded by pen if it is to survive marble monuments. The book discusses the Trojan matter of King John, which powerfully structures and textures the scenes of the siege of Angiers and, more specifically, the tragic fates of Constance and Arthur. It also considers some metamorphoses of Shakespeare and Ovid. The book reiterates imaginative association, influence, historically diachronic descent study, as evidenced in that kind of critical work that finds in a keyword an attractive pretext for projecting an author's particular interest or, a critic's. Yves Peyré's work opens perspectives on post-Shakespeare reworkings and Shakespearian myths that were also explored during the ESRA conference and inspired a separate collection of essays, Mythologising Shakespeare: A European Perspective.

Janice Valls- Russell

‘tragical-historical-mythological’, a genre overlooked by Polonius ( Hamlet , II.ii.396–402). I wish to discuss what does not seem to be there: I mean the Trojan matter of the play, which powerfully structures and textures the scenes of the siege of Angiers and, more specifically, the tragic fates of Constance and Arthur. Besides a close textual reading in the light of the Trojan material that was available

in Interweaving myths in Shakespeare and his contemporaries
Reading historically and intertextually
Judith Anderson

forty-sixth sonnet to strengthen its reminiscence of the Troilus , his forty-fourth sonnet begins, ‘When those renoumed noble Peres of Greece, / thrugh stubborn pride amongst themselves did jar’ (1–2). Aware of Spenser’s recurrent engagement of Trojan matter, I fully expect to hear next about the siege of Troy, only to discover that the quarrelsome peers are the Argonauts, ‘forgetfull of the famous golden fleece’ (3). This correction fails to cancel my momentary recollection of the Trojan war, however: simply put, it has

in Rereading Chaucer and Spenser