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The influence of Trotskyism in Britain
John Callaghan

1 Engaging with Trotsky The influence of Trotskyism in Britain John Callaghan Part I Movements Trotsky became known in Britain after the Bolshevik Revolution in association with Lenin, as he did across the globe. But as early as 1920 Bertrand Russell, who noted the ‘lightening intelligence’, vanity and charisma of the man while visiting Moscow, warned that Trotsky was ‘not by any means’ regarded as Lenin’s equal by his Bolshevik comrades.1 By January 1925, the Communist Party of Great Britain (CPGB) was depicting Trotsky, who had ‘resigned’ his government posts

in Against the grain
The Spanish Civil War in Ken Loach’s Land and Freedom
Alan Munton

derives from Lenin’s success in the Russian revolution of 1917, and it is essentially authoritarian. Where the Bolshevik-Leninist parties lead, others must follow. The fact that this analysis has not led to success anywhere in Europe or elsewhere is the consequence of a betrayal of the working class by other parties on the left. Trotsky’s belief that betrayal was inherent in all reformist movements

in Gender and warfare in the twentieth century
Celia Hughes

6 Trotskyism and the revolutionary self Trotskyist men and women faced greater continuation of political culture between student and adult life than did their counterparts on the ‘non-aligned’ Left. In IS and the IMG the upsurge of union militancy and industrial strife that flourished during 1969 –72 confirmed the leadership in its ambitions for building the revolutionary party. Politics focused on external sites of struggle, and the masculine militant culture that had characterised the VSC continued to prevail. However, activists remained emotional, gendered

in Young lives on the Left
1980–2000
Dominique Marshall

/04/federal-budget-2021-foreign-aid/ (accessed 6 June 2021 ). Brushett , K. ( 2019 ), ‘ “Trotsky in Pinstripes”: Lewis Perinbam, CIDA, and the Non-Governmental Organizations Program, 1968–1991 ’, in Donaghy , G. and Webster , D. (eds), A Samaritan State Revisited: Historical Perspectives on Canadian Foreign Aid ( Calgary : University of Calgary Press ), pp. 163 – 85 . Campbell-Miller , J. ( 2014 ) ‘ “Leveraging the Synergies” or a Return to the past?: The Decision to Do away with CIDA ’, Active History , http

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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The British far left from 1956
Editors: Evan Smith and Matthew Worley

This book explores the role of the far left in British history from the mid-1950s until the present. It highlights the impact made by the far left on British politics and society. The book first looks at particular strands of the far left in Britain since the 1950s. It then looks at various issues and social movements such as Trotskyism, anti-revisionism and anarchism, that the left engaged (or did not engage) with, such as women's liberation, gay liberation, anti-colonialism, anti-racism and anti-fascism. The book focuses on how the wider British left, in the Labour Party and amongst the intelligentsia, encountered Trotskyism between the 1930s and 1960s. The Socialist Party (SP) and the Socialist Workers Party (SWP) traditions have proven to be the most durable and high profile of all of Britain's competing Trotskyist tendencies. Their opponents in the International Marxist Group and the Socialist Labour League/Workers' Revolutionary Party (SLL/WRP) each met limited success and influence in the labour movement and wider social movements. The SWP and Militant/SP outlived the 'official' Communist Party of Great Britain and from the collapse of the Soviet Union to the present day have continued to influence labour movement and wider politics, albeit episodically. The book is concerned with providing an overview of their development, dating from the end of the Second World War to the onset of the 2009 economic crisis.

How the personal got political
Author: Lucy Robinson

This book demonstrates how the personal became political in post-war Britain, and argues that attention to gay activism can help us to rethink fundamentally the nature of post-war politics. While the Left were fighting among themselves and the reformists were struggling with the limits of law reform, gay men started organising for themselves, first individually within existing organisations and later rejecting formal political structures altogether. Gay activists intersected with Trotskyism, Stalinism, the New Left, feminism and youth movements. As the slogan of the Gay Liberation Front proclaimed, ‘Come out, come together and change the world’. Culture, performance and identity took over from economics and class struggle, as gay men worked to change the world through the politics of sexuality. Throughout the post-war years, the new cult of the teenager in the 1950s, CND and the counter-culture of the 1960s, gay liberation, feminism, the Punk movement and the miners' strike of 1984 all helped to build a politics of identity. When AIDS and Thatcherism impacted on gay men's lives in the 1980s, gay politics came into its own. There is an assumption among many of today's politicians that young people are apathetic and disengaged. This book argues that these politicians are looking in the wrong place. People now feel that they can impact the world through the way in which they live, shop, have sex and organise their private lives. The book shows that gay men and their politics have been central to this change in the post-war world.

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Losey in Europe
Colin Gardner

on a distinguished twenty-one-year career in British cinema dating back to the The Sleeping Tiger , his first propitious collaboration with Dirk Bogarde and long-time production designer, Richard Macdonald. In fact, of Losey’s last nine features, six films – The Assassination of Trotsky (1972), A Doll’s House (1973), Mr. Klein (1976), Les Routes du Sud (1978), Don Giovanni (1979) and La Truite

in Joseph Losey
Ben Cohen and Eve Garrard

(This essay was first published in New Left Review , No. 224, July/August 1997) I shall begin here from an astonishing fact. In December 1938, in an appeal to American Jews, Leon Trotsky in a certain manner predicted the impending Jewish catastrophe. Here is what he wrote: It is possible to imagine without difficulty what awaits the Jews at the mere outbreak of the future world war. But even without war the next development of world reaction signifies with certainty the physical extermination of the Jews. 1 This was just a few weeks after

in The Norman Geras Reader
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The embodiment of the Red/Black Atlantic in theory and practice
Chris Gilligan and Nigel Niles

host of other topics that she wrote about during her lifetime. We have only touched on these topics in so far as they illuminate her Red/Black theory and practice. The chapter is organised around two key moments in her own political development and provides (in the footnotes) a selective introduction to the online Raya Dunayevskaya archives. 2 The first section provides an introduction to her ‘early’ life, including the period when she worked with Trotsky. The second section outlines her break with Trotsky and her cofounding

in Revolutionary lives of the Red and Black Atlantic since 1917
The political history of two principal trends in British Trotskyism, 1945–2009
Phil Burton-Cartledge

4 Marching separately, seldom together The political history of two principal trends in British Trotskyism, 1945–2009 Phil Burton-Cartledge Marching separately, seldom together The Socialist Party (SP) (formerly the Militant Tendency) and the Socialist Workers Party (SWP) traditions have proven to be the most durable and high profile of all of Britain’s competing Trotskyist tendencies. Their opponents in the International Marxist Group and the Socialist Labour League/Workers’ Revolutionary Party (SLL/WRP) each met limited success and influence in the labour

in Against the grain