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Abstract only
Author: Lez Cooke

This book provides a full-length study of the screenwriter Troy Kennedy Martin, whose work for film and television includes Z Cars, The Italian Job, Kelly's Heroes, The Sweeney, Reilly—Ace of Spies and Edge of Darkness. With a career spanning six decades, Kennedy Martin has seen the rise and fall of the television dramatist, making his debut in the era of studio-based television drama in the late 1950s. This was prior to the transition to filmed drama (for which he argued in a famous manifesto), as the television play was gradually replaced by popular series and serials, for which Kennedy Martin, of course, created some of his best work.

Abstract only
Lez Cooke

Biographical sketch 1 Francis Troy Kennedy Martin was born on Bute, an island on the Clyde, on the west coast of Scotland, on 15 February 1932. His father named him Troy after a Glasgow priest, Father Troy, who had helped the young Frank Martin to rehabilitate following his return from the First World War, where he had been wounded. Kennedy was added to the name by Frank Martin in memory of his commanding officer in the war, Colonel Kennedy. They went through the Battle of the Somme together and later the Battle of Cambrae where Kennedy was killed at Bourlon Wood

in Troy Kennedy Martin
Abstract only
Lez Cooke

Introduction Z Cars, Diary of a Young Man, The Italian Job, Kelly’s Heroes, The Sweeney, Reilly – Ace of Spies and Edge of Darkness – whenever the name of Troy Kennedy Martin is mentioned it is invariably accompanied by a list of these titles, the films and television dramas with which he is most often associated as a screenwriter. These seven productions are in themselves testimony to the diversity of projects with which Kennedy Martin has been involved in a career spanning six decades. They suggest an interest in popular forms of film and television drama and an

in Troy Kennedy Martin
Lez Cooke

The hostile waters of British television in a deregulated age 6 Since Edge of Darkness Troy Kennedy Martin has had relatively little work produced. In the twenty years since that award-winning serial he has been credited for just four screenplays, two of which were scripts where he helped out with re-writing or made a minor contribution, and one was an adaptation. Yet in this period he has worked on at least fifteen other projects, some screenplays, some television drama serials and single dramas. The ratio of work written to work produced in this period reveals

in Troy Kennedy Martin
Abstract only
Lez Cooke

-part Casanova (BBC2, 1971). Multi-part dramatisations of novels had been present on British television since the early 1950s but, apart from Nigle Kneale’s trailblazing 1950s Quatermass serials, the original drama serial was less evident until writers such as Potter, John Finch, Trevor Griffiths, Alan Plater, Trevor Preston and Troy Kennedy Martin began producing long-form drama in the 1970s and 1980s. Such serials usually comprised six episodes but could be longer, with John Finch’s Sam (Granada, 1973–5) extending to an exceptional thirty-nine episodes. Fear of God (1980

in Troy Kennedy Martin
Lez Cooke

which can re-create the direction, the fire, and the ideas which TV used to have. Something which can provide, for the first time, an area of theory, experiment and development which TV drama has never had and which it needs so badly. (Kennedy Martin, 1964: 21) Troy Kennedy Martin’s famous polemic, ‘Nats Go Home’, subtitled ‘First Statement of a New Drama for Television’, was published in the theatre magazine Encore in March 1964. Its opening paragraph set the tone for an article which was to stir up a hornet’s nest in television drama circles at the time and which has

in Troy Kennedy Martin
Abstract only
Lez Cooke

Liverpool police detective Bill Prendergast. However Troy Kennedy Martin started work on Z Cars in April 1961, several months before Jacks and Knaves was broadcast, even before the Storyboard plays were produced. He described the genesis of Z Cars in an article written in 1978: I was lying, annoyingly ill, in 1961 monitoring police messages to pass the time and occasionally coming across incidents where it was obvious that the police were not coping. They seemed confused, lost and apparently young and inexperienced. The world that filtered through these fragmented calls

in Troy Kennedy Martin
Abstract only
Lez Cooke

which they have to carry out their work. The author, Troy Kennedy Martin is a twenty-six year-old Scotsman with a University training in history and political science who went into the British Army on a short-service commission from Ireland. He spent nine months in Cyprus as an Infantry Officer in the Troodos Mountains, holding a short-service commission in the Gordon Highlanders.1 Cooke_01_All.indd 17 11/12/06 12:38:43 18 Troy Kennedy Martin Incident at Echo Six (1958) Troy Kennedy Martin’s first television play, Incident at Echo Six (BBC, 9 December 1958), marked

in Troy Kennedy Martin
Editor: Laura Mulvey
Author: Jamie Sexton

This book addresses the aesthetics of British television programmes, charting some key examples of experiment and formal or stylistic innovation, drawing mostly on arts documentaries and drama productions. It turns to the work of the little known Langham Group. In contrast to the populism of Armchair Theatre, the group emerged from a British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) initiative to consider 'the problem of experimental television programmes'. The book discusses very varied examples of experimental television that flourished during the 1960s. It also introduces Channel 4 with an insider's account of a world of utopian hopes and the snares of the schedule. The book then looks at two series that attempted to experiment with the presentation of art to British television viewers: New Tempo and Who Is?. It explores the relationship between the series and Troy Kennedy Martin's 'Nats Go Home' manifesto, a polemic against naturalism in television drama which provided a theoretical rationale for the experimentalism of Diary of a Young Man. The book further examines the product of that experiment, placing it in the context of John McGrath's other work and his own 1979 'manifesto' for progressive television. It argues that Dennis Potter's drama, and particularly The Singing Detective, contributes to experimental television through systematic comment on, and elaboration of, the medium's inherent polysemic nature. Finally, the book focuses on the presentation of pop music on television, specifically the pop promo, rather than the dedicated music television programme.

Diary of a Young Man
John Hill

3049 Experimental British Tele 16/5/07 08:02 Page 48 3 A ‘new drama for television’?: Diary of a Young Man1 John Hill Diary of a Young Man was a six-part series broadcast on BBC1 in August and September 1964. Billed in the Radio Times as an example of ‘a new kind of writing for television’, it was a self-consciously ‘experimental’ work, intended to extend the boundaries of television drama through the employment of new techniques.2 Written by Troy Kennedy Martin and John McGrath, produced by James MacTaggart and directed by Ken Loach and Peter Duguid, it

in Experimental British television