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Author: Mary Venner

The reconstruction of Kosovo after 1999 was one of the largest and most ambitious international interventions in a post conflict country. Kosovo was seen by many international actors as a ‘green fields’ site on which to construct the government institutions and practices they considered necessary for future peace and prosperity. For a while Kosovo was close to being a laboratory for the practice of institution building and capacity development. This book looks beyond the apparently united and generally self congratulatory statements of international organisations and donors to examine what actually happened when they tried to work together in Kosovo to construct a new public administration. It considers the interests and motivations and the strengths and weaknesses of each of the major players and how these affected what they did, how they did it, and how successful they were in achieving their goals. Although in general the international exercise in Kosovo can be seen as a success, the results have been uneven. Some public administration institutions perform well while others face ongoing challenges. The book argues that to a significant extent the current day performance of the Kosovo government can be traced to the steps taken, or sometimes not taken, by various international actors in the early years of the international intervention.

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Mary Venner

it generally received less attention than fiscal policies and institutions and most responsibility for achieving it was assigned to UNMIK’s civil administration component. This chapter describes the main activities of the Mission in establishing the Kosovo civil service beyond the realm of the public finance institutions. It is organised in more or less chronological order and describes developments

in Donors, technical assistance and public administration in Kosovo
William Thomas Worster

Administrations and those that do not. 4 This chapter is focused on whether governance of a territory by the United Nations produces effects in customary international law, so it will consider examples of that practice regardless of whether the particular nuances of the administration might fall under a strict definition of International Territorial Administration. Specifically, this chapter will survey citations to the practice of UNTAES (United Nations Transitional Authority in Eastern Slavonia, Baranja, Western Sirmium), UNMIK (United Nations Mission in Kosovo), and UNTAET

in International organisations, non-State actors, and the formation of customary international law
Mary Venner

judged to have been successful and has contributed to the creation of a relatively effective PFM function in Kosovo. PFM development in Kosovo Developing Kosovo’s revenue and expenditure management institutions was high on the list of reform and transformation initiatives planned by donors in the lead up to the post-conflict intervention. It was also an important issue for UNMIK

in Donors, technical assistance and public administration in Kosovo
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Mary Venner

reconstruction of damaged economic assets’, 13 and a paper presented to the conference by the EU official who would head up UNMIK’s ‘Pillar IV’, Joly Dixon, boldly stated that ‘UNMIK’s mission is to turn Kosovo into a multi-ethnic democracy with a well-functioning economy firmly based on market principles and the rule of law’. 14 In his remarks to the conference he added ‘the idea of just putting the thing

in Donors, technical assistance and public administration in Kosovo
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Mary Venner

Official reports on the UN Mission in Kosovo generally refer to UNMIK as the only significant actor in the territory during its post-conflict reconstruction. In the field of public administration development, however, several large and influential international organisations and bilateral donors in addition to the UN played leading roles. Although the majority of these actors

in Donors, technical assistance and public administration in Kosovo
Abstract only
Europeanisation in the making
Boyka Stefanova

The military intervention ended with UN Security Council (UNSC) Resolution 1244 separating the governance of Kosovo into a UN protectorate under the UN Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK). 9 UNSC Resolution 1244 and UNMIK marked an important stage in the conflict resolution process but did not constitute a durable settlement. The conflict remained in its overt expression as both parties pursued

in The Europeanisation of conflict resolution
Learning from the case of Kosovo
Jenny H. Peterson

(ICG,1999c; interview with international staff, 2006). The bombardment ended on 10 June after a negotiated withdrawal of Serbian forces from the territory. UN Security Council Resolution 1244 left a United Nations administration (the United Nations Mission in Kosovo – UNMIK) in control of Kosovo pending the resolution of final status. Over 42,000 NATO troops formed a peacekeeping force (KFOR). Serbia, de jure, retained its sovereignty over the territory and thus, technically, Kosovo remained part of the Serbian state. The growth of Kosovo’s war economy Beginning with

in Building a peace economy?
Nigel D. White

drawn from TCNs). The chapter concludes by examining issues of attribution in firstly the Behrami case before the ECtHR in 2007, a case that concerned the failure by KFOR/UNMIK to clear cluster munitions in Kosovo in 1999, and secondly various cases before Dutch courts following the failure by the Dutch battalion of UNPROFOR to protect civilians in Srebrenica in 1995. ARIO and the problem of attribution The purpose of this chapter is not to summarise all the Articles in ARIO 2011 but to highlight and analyse some of the key provisions. The Articles are abstract

in The law of international organisations (third edition)
Open Access (free)
Liberal reform and the creation of new conflict economies
Jenny H. Peterson

other former Yugoslav republics, Kosovo technically remained part of the Serbian state. Due to pressure from both domestic and international actors to privatise, UNMIK created the Kosovo Trust Agency (KTA) in 2002 (UNMIK, 2002c, 2003a, 2005a). As with law and security, privatisation was considered a reserved power; only the SRSG could grant authority to privatise SOEs in Kosovo. The KTA had two mandates: to supervise the management of publicly owned enterprises (POEs) and to privatise SOEs. POEs include the major public services including power, water, sewage and

in Building a peace economy?