Abstract only
Neoconservative Hunters and Terrorist Vampires in Joe Ahearne‘s Ultraviolet (1998)
David McWilliam

A consideration of the ways in which the discourse of monstrosity, once deployed against a political enemy, closes off open debate and undermine the values of those who argue that the ends needed to defeat them justify any means used. This article explores the parallels between the neoconservative rhetoric of the War on Terror with that of the vampire hunters in Joe Ahearnes television show Ultraviolet (1998), as both deny their enemies the status of political subjects. It offers a reading of the show in light of Slavoj Žižeks call to evaluate the arguments of both sides in such moralised conflicts.

Gothic Studies
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

, and state-of-the-art fused quartz mercury vapour bulb, the ‘Vi-tan’ lamp was an object at once homely and technologically sophisticated ( Fig. 4.1 ). Supplied with the lamp were brown-tinted, leather goggles ( Fig. 4.2 ), a requisite piece of apparel for exposure to a bulb that the manufacturer declared emitted a whopping (and, frankly, highly unlikely) 99 per cent of invisible ultraviolet light. According to contemporaneous textbooks, standard

in Soaking up the rays
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

), dermatitis solaris (dermatitis due to the sun), eczema solare (eczema due to the sun), as well as erythema solare (inflammation due to the sun). 4 Such confusion centred on understandings of inflammation (erythema) resulting from the sun’s light as distinct from its heat. As early as 1858, the famous French neurologist Dr Jean-Martin Charcot suggested that solar erythema was generated by the blue, violet, and ultraviolet end of

in Soaking up the rays
Open Access (free)
Light therapy and visual culture in Britain, c. 1890–1940

Soaking up the rays forges a new path for exploring Britain’s fickle love of the light by investigating the beginnings of light therapy in the country from c.1890-1940. Despite rapidly becoming a leading treatment for tuberculosis, rickets and other infections and skin diseases, light therapy was a contentious medical practice. Bodily exposure to light, whether for therapeutic or aesthetic ends, persists as a contested subject to this day: recommended to counter psoriasis and other skin conditions as well as Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and depression; closely linked to notions of beauty, happiness and well-being, fuelling tourism to sunny locales abroad and the tanning industry at home; and yet with repeated health warnings that it is a dangerous carcinogen. By analysing archival photographs, illustrated medical texts, advertisements, lamps, and goggles and their visual representation of how light acted upon the body, Woloshyn assesses their complicated contribution to the founding of light therapy. Soaking up the rays will appeal to those intrigued by medicine’s visual culture, especially academics and students of the histories of art and visual culture, material cultures, medicine, science and technology, and popular culture.

Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

Ultra-violet radiation puts up the general resistance of the body to disease, and promotes good health and sexual power of citizens who by sedentary indoor lives during the winter have become depressed and out of condition […] Marasmic and delicate children may be made better, and mothers who cannot nurse their babies may be made

in Soaking up the rays
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

Stern to illustrate the beneficent work of the institution for a 1935 fund-raising pamphlet. While Figure 3.2 was printed to be reproduced in the pamphlet and put on display at the hospital, Figure 3.1 mysteriously did not make the cut. 3 3.1  Edith Tudor-Hart, Ultraviolet Light Treatment, South London Hospital

in Soaking up the rays
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

patients in the gardens of the country branch of the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital at Brockley Hill, Stanmore, Middlesex.’ In ‘Light Treatment in Hospitals’, Times supplement, 22 May 1928, p. xxxi. 1.3  ‘A corner of the ultra-violet ray clinic at

in Soaking up the rays
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

-Hart, Dr Dora Colebrook, the all-female staff of the SLHWC, and even Queen Alexandra, these are important female agents who actively contributed to the therapy’s development and dissemination in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Britain. 7 Equally silent are the voices of patients, especially children, and of various members of the public who consumed home-use lamps and their emanating ultraviolet

in Soaking up the rays
Refugees and schools in the Manchester region
Bill Williams

application of electrical currents. He also designed and introduced an ultra-violet lamp without water cooling, the prototype of modern ultra-violet lamps. In 1911 he designed an apparatus to produce an electro-rhythmic current for electrical vibrations treatment. In 1912 he invented the neon lamp, originally for medical purposes. In 1933 he left Berlin for Britain, where he was immediately made an honorary consultant in physiotherapy at the London Jewish Hospital. In 1934 he was awarded the ‘Golden Key’ of the American Congress of Physical Therapy for ‘outstanding service

in ‘Jews and other foreigners’
The application of scientific techniques to diagnose the disease
Patricia Rutherford

exploits the reaction between antibodies and antigens, as antibodies raised by infecting laboratory animals with the disease of interest can easily be isolated and conjugated to a tag that can be visualised directly or under a certain ultraviolet wavelength (Burry 2009: 1–4). Previous research has applied immunocytochemistry to ancient tissues to reveal the presence of cellular components (Horton et al. 1983; Krypczyk and Tapp 1986; Fulcheri, Baracchini and Rabino Massa 1992; Nerlich et al. 1993) but not to demonstrate the disease. Studies have also embedded ancient

in Mummies, magic and medicine in ancient Egypt