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The Urban Gothic of Fin-de-Siècle London and Gotham City
Erica McCrystal

Gothic literature set in fin-de-siècle London has often been argued to highlight duality. However, the urban Gothic truly flourishes through its liminality, which allows chaos and order to coexist. Texts such as Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde and Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray offer versions of a Gothic London that have the appearance of structure but are difficult to navigate. Likewise, the Batman franchise has embraced Gotham City as a setting that provides tensions between order and chaos. In Gotham, as in fin-de-siècle London, liminality puts pressures on apparent boundaries. While the urban Gothic initially developed through nineteenth century British texts, modern-day comics and films within the Batman franchise have allowed us to see how a multiverse normalises liminality and embraces multiple works to speak collectively about Gothic tensions. This article analyses the liminal nature of the urban Gothic in both cities side by side to argue that the urban Gothic’s liminal nature allows instability to reign.

Gothic Studies
Chris Louttit

Since 2005 Tim Burton’s imagination has frequently turned to Victorian-related subjects. Focusing primarily on Corpse Bride (2005), Sweeney Todd (2007) and Alice in Wonderland (2010), this article argues that Burton’s response to (neo-) Victorian culture is a distinctly Gothic one. Unlike other more literary and canonical types of neo-Victorianism it engages with the popular and strongly Gothicised conceptions of the Victorian that emerged through the horror cinema of the twentieth century. It is also Gothic in the way that it self-consciously blends the Victorian with other cultural trends. As a result, rather than offering a strongly theorised, academic view of the Victorians, Burton remediates them for his own aesthetic purposes.

Gothic Studies
Theorizing the Nineteenth-Century Gothic Pharmography
Carol Margaret Davison

Liberty, a term dear to the Enlightenments emancipatory project, has long been a key concept in the Gothic. No branch of the Gothic more powerfully or creatively examines the complexities of the liberty question than the Gothic pharmography – a narrative chronicling drug/alcohol seduction and addiction. Drawing on three novelistic sub-genres – the Oriental tale, the imperial Gothic, and the Urban Gothic – the Gothic pharmography coalesces several distinct nineteenth-century debates – the nature of the will and liberal individualism; social oppression and conformity; urban and national degeneration; and British imperialist expansion, which involved the perceived anxiety-inducing sense of Britains growing economic dependence on the non-Western world. This essay offers an overview of the Gothic pharmography from the late eighteenth century through to the fin de siècle in Marie Corelli‘s Wormwood.

Gothic Studies
French fiction and Djuna Barnes’s Nightwood
Avril Horner

urban Gothic space in the sense defined by Alexandra Warwick:‘The city is seen as uncanny, constructed by people yet unknowable by the individual’ (Mulvey-Roberts 1998 , 288-289). Paris, Vienna, Berlin and New York as we see them in Nightwood are ‘unknowable’ in this sense; they are labyrinthine spaces where freedom exists more as an intellectual

in European Gothic
Doris Lessing’s late-twentieth-century fiction
Susan Watkins

; Lessing deploys what might be termed the ‘minor’ genres of urban gothic, picaresque and disaster narrative in her late-twentieth-century work in unfamiliar and disturbing ways. Certainly, genre and ‘race’ are connected issues in Lessing’s work, and it is only when those connections are understood that we can make an assessment of this fiction and understand Lessing’s attack on dominant cultural and ideological formations in the late twentieth century. This attack is a clear response to the cultural climate of the period in which the novels were written, a climate in

in Doris Lessing
Nordic Gothic and transcultural adaptation
Maria Holmgren Troy

This chapter investigates the two most influential examples of contemporary Nordic Gothic, Lars von Trier’s TV series Riget and John Ajvide Lindqvist’s novel Låt den rätte komma in and its Swedish film adaptation together with the American adaptations of these Nordic works: Stephen King’s Kingdom Hospital (ABC 2004) and Matt Reeves’ Let Me In (2010). The chapter first briefly discusses Gothic TV and TV horror and outlines how von Trier, King and Lindqvist have moved between different media. It then goes on to examine some differences between the Nordic and American productions that are related to Gothic humour. In terms of setting, the American adaptations are placed in small American towns rather than the central locations constituted by the Danish capital in Riget and the Stockholm suburb in Låt den rätte komma in. Whereas the American adaptations thus pertain to King’s brand of small-town American Gothic, the Nordic works can be seen as a kind of urban Gothic. The settings, the chapter suggests, also make visible ideological differences between the Nordic Gothic works and the American adaptations.

in Nordic Gothic
Abstract only
Jonathan Rayner

and national icon. The films, despite their distinction from the contemporaneity and spareness of social commentaries like Shame, are the epitome of the Gothic in their generic hybridisation, their parodic and black comedic approach, and their subversion of authority and heroism. The series’ development from its low-budget, B-picture origins to its big-budget finale is the final irony, as the subversive and exploitative prototype evolves (as does its star) into mainstream Hollywood product. The urban Gothic

in Contemporary Australian cinema
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Maria Holmgren Troy, Johan Höglund, Yvonne Leffler, and Sofia Wijkmark

American productions that are related to what Troy calls ‘Gothic humour’. In terms of setting, the American adaptations are placed in small American towns rather than the central locations constituted by the Danish capital in Riget and the Stockholm suburb in Låt den rätte komma in . Whereas the American adaptations thus pertain to King's brand of small-town American Gothic, the Nordic works can be seen as a kind of urban Gothic. The settings, Troy suggests, also make visible ideological differences between the Nordic Gothic works and the American adaptations

in Nordic Gothic
Sherlock Holmes, Count Dracula and London
Andrew Smith

their sexuality, investing it with a dark and magical quality which is beyond the reach of scientific knowledge.’ 6 In both De Quincey and the Holmes tales, the mysteries of women become the mysteries of London. It is an issue that Dickens developed in Bleak House and Collins in The Woman in White. Urban Gothic: Dickens and Collins Robert Mighall in A Geography of

in Victorian demons
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Fear, the law and liquid modernity
Avril Horner

-millennial urban gothic texts it is the very sophistication of the city, rather than its dark labyrinths, that produces the nightmare: this is a world we know all too well, a world of underground car parks and bleak purpose-built high-rise office blocks housing identical corporate rooms. It is perhaps significant that we see almost nothing of the interior of Commissioner Gordon’s family home and nothing at all of

in Globalgothic