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A guide to dark visibilities

Gothic as a genre has become more amorphous and difficult to contain. This book brings together for the first time many of the multifarious visual motifs and media associated with Gothic together with areas that have never received serious study or mention in this regard before. It draws attention to an array of dark artefacts such as Goth and Gothic jewellery, dolls, posters and food, which, though part of popular mass marketing, have often been marginalised and largely omitted from the mainstream of Gothic Studies publishing. The book moves from the earliest Gothic architecture to décor and visual aspects of theatrical design, masquerade and dance. It focuses on paintings in two historical spans from Jan Van Eyck to Henry Fuseli and from Goya to H. R. Giger to consider Clovis Trouille's works influenced by horror films and Vincent Castiglia's paintings in blood. Gothic engravings, motifs of spectral portraits, posters and signs are covered. The book then uses early visual devices like Eidophusikon and the long-lived entertainment of peepshows to introduce a discussion of projection technologies like magic lanterns and, subsequently, film and TV. Gothic photography from Daguerreotypes onwards; and Gothic font, scripts and calligraphy are then discussed. Finally, the book presents a survey of the development of newer Gothic media, such as video gaming, virtual reality (VR) games and survival horror apps.

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David Annwn Jones

spans (1434–1790) from Jan Van Eyck to Henry Fuseli (1819–2008) from Goya to H. R. Giger, moving on to consider Clovis Trouille’s works influenced by horror films and Vincent Castiglia’s paintings in blood. I then cover Gothic engravings, motifs of spectral portraits, posters and signs. My book’s title engages with the Biblical injunction against the making of ‘graven images’, and the creation of

in Gothic effigy
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David Annwn Jones

Vincent Castiglia’s nightmarish scenes painted in blood, John Coulthart’s Lovecraftian illustrations, Anne Sudworth’s gleaming pastel landscapes and Raphael Lacoste’s panoramic visions of looming fortresses and abbeys. Victoria Reynold’s detailed paintings of internal organs as in Reindeer Voluptuary (2008) and Jasmine Becket-Griffith’s baskets of plush fruit have given a new and dark edge to nature

in Gothic effigy