Interactions and influences, 1650–1830
Editor: H. V. Bowen

Written by leading specialists in the field, this book is a collection of essays that explore economic, social, cultural, political, and religious interactions between Wales and the empire. It discusses the many relationships that developed between Wales and the British overseas empire between 1650 and 1830. The book looks at Welsh influences on the emergence of 'British' imperialism, as well as the impact that the empire had upon the development of Wales itself. Using the West Indian and East Indian connection, the book quantifies different interactions that occurred between Wales and the overseas empire. It highlights how expansion in Asia served to draw Wales and the Welsh into the domestic and overseas worlds of the London-based East India Company. The book also explores the aspects of the impact that expansion had upon the development of the Welsh economy. The focus then turns to the Atlantic-facing parts of the Welsh economy. How British expansion in the Atlantic basin opened up opportunities for people from Wales to take a prominent place in international communities of religious thought and belief is shown. Participation in an expanding spiritual empire brought like-minded individuals together in transoceanic networks and this engagement helped to shape the emergence of Welsh evangelical identities. Finally, Welsh interactions with the nascent British empire in India are analysed. Much work remains to be done if Wales is to be fully integrated into the British imperial historiography and the empire is to be afforded a central role in the writing of Welsh history.

Rhetoric, fragments – and beyond?
Neil Evans

. Canadian historians, for instance, have also faced the issue of whether their people were colonisers or colonised – and coming to terms with the fact that they have been both. 3 But in Wales the discussion has been remarkably one-sided: there has been little sustained interest in the place of Welsh people in the empire. Imperialism has entered Welsh discussion mainly as internal colonialism, in the now rather tired debates initiated by Michael Hechter. More usefully, it has been reprised, with cultural variations, in the recent

in Wales and the British overseas empire
Contrasting articulations with the Atlantic world
Chris Evans

attention is given to the Atlantic borderland of the British archipelago, of which Wales was part. Although historians are increasingly interested in the impact that imperial endeavour had on the British Isles themselves, the focus of attention is very often metropolitan – on London as the organising centre of a ‘gentlemanly capitalism’, for example. The cultural turn taken by the ‘new imperial history’, with its professed concern for the marginal and the subaltern, promises something different, but here too a metropolitan bias

in Wales and the British overseas empire
Abstract only
H. V. Bowen

Without much fear of contradiction it can be stated that Wales and the Welsh have always been located at the very outer margins of British imperial historiography; and similarly it can be said that the British Empire has never loomed very large in writing on the domestic history of Wales. Several landmark publications on the broad sweep of British imperial history published in the last decade or so barely mention Welsh involvement in the overseas empire, 1 and recent examinations of the impact of empire on

in Wales and the British overseas empire
Abstract only
H. V. Bowen

Taken together, the essays in this volume point to Welsh relationships with the British overseas empire that were complex, multilayered and at times contradictory; and by bringing together a very wide range of evidence they significantly advance our understanding of the different ways in which Wales interacted with the wider world. The authors have measured participation in imperial activity, mapped overseas connections, marked out similarities and differences by comparing Wales with other parts of the British and

in Wales and the British overseas empire
David Ceri Jones

community that had grown up in the wake of the dramatic religious revivals that had occurred in parts of Germany, Switzerland, Austria, France, England, Wales, Scotland and the American colonies spanning a twenty-year period from the later 1720s to the closing years of the 1740s. 2 Benefiting from population increases and enhanced demographic mobility, the opening up of new trade routes and markets, the growth of consumer demand and the extension of the reach of the tentacles of empire, these religious awakenings brought like

in Wales and the British overseas empire
The Welsh in Asia, c.1700–1815
Andrew Mackillop

In the introduction to a volume of essays on the ‘New British History’ and its relationship to Irish and Scottish historical studies, the editors allude to Wales in a way that might equally be applied to the Principality’s place within British imperial history. Explaining how ‘four-nation’ approaches have developed strongly in certain chronological and geographic areas and not in others, they note that ‘Wales, notwithstanding distinguished work on its history, seems to be the dog that seldom barks within the New

in Wales and the British overseas empire
Abstract only
History, politics, society
Alistair Cole

3 Wales and Brittany: history, politics, society The choice of Wales and Brittany to form the core of a comparative case study presents two historic regions with complex but strong identities. Insofar as their quality as regions is concerned, the mix of similarity and difference makes the Wales-Brittany pair a good one for comparative analysis, fulfilling the criteria of comparability in terms of spatial location, population size, economic activity, linguistic specificity and common historical ties. The WalesBrittany comparison was designed to elucidate similar

in Beyond devolution and decentralisation
The Pennants’ Jamaican plantations and industrialisation in North Wales, 1771–1812
Trevor Burnard

Little work has been done about Wales and the Americas before 1776 and virtually none on Wales and the Caribbean. 1 The reason is pretty clear. Welsh migration to British America was relatively insignificant and Welsh impact on its culture was insignificant, except in limited cases such as in areas of Pennsylvania where the Welsh presence is marked by a series of Welsh place names, the most famous being the town of Bryn Mawr, home to a leading private women’s college. Perhaps 2,000 Welsh Quakers left for America between

in Wales and the British overseas empire
India, the East India Company and the Welsh economy, c.1750–1830
H. V. Bowen

In the previous essay Andrew Mackillop explained why only comparatively small numbers of Welsh men and women found their way to Asia during the long eighteenth century. In view of this, it is quite reasonable to assume that any interactions that occurred between Wales and Britain’s growing empire in the east were somewhat limited. Indeed, logic would appear to dictate that the process of British territorial and commercial expansion in Asia which gathered pace after the East India Company’s conquest of Bengal

in Wales and the British overseas empire