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Frontier patterns old and new
Philip Nanton

the second boom in the price of sugar, the fear of increasing costs resulting from the abolition of slavery, and growing difficulties in obtaining property sales of plantations encumbered by high mortgages and with the abandonment of certain estates, a dramatic change occurred, in perceptions of both the fabulously wealthy West Indian and the value of a close colonial relationship. The change leads

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Avery Kolers

1993 , p. 50). Hence, although ‘none of these lines was absolute’, James had to choose one or the other of the two social groupings between which there was ‘a continual rivalry, distrust and ill-feeling, which, skilfully played upon by the European peoples, poisons the life of the community’ (James 1993 , p. 51). 2 This division was not, however, a rivalry of equals: ‘in a West Indian colony the surest sign of a man having arrived is the fact that he keeps company with people lighter in complexion than himself

in Solidarity – Nature, grounds, and value
Philip Nanton

middle-class West Indian children, he is indulged. He loves comic books – the large, brightly coloured American ones, and later the smaller, grittier black-and-white ones with British Second World War stories. This passion is one of the few he and his father share, and so the man funds and shares his son’s insatiable appetite for them. I cannot say that I knew my father well. Perhaps he did

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Open Access (free)
Andrea Sangiovanni

Indian cricket of the time is a central stage 1 in which everyday Trinidadian resistance to colonialism is played out (and, often, as in James's own more ambivalent case, only half- played out). The teams are the lived embodiment of both a spiritual and a physical resistance; in them, among other things, Black Trinidadians place their hopes for transcending the categories of racialism and colonialism. James writes: I do not know of any West Indians in

in Solidarity – Nature, grounds, and value