Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 338 items for :

  • "World Health Organization" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Nitsan Chorev

. Theodore ( 2002 ) ‘ Cities and the Geographies of “Actually Existing Neoliberalism ’, Antipode 34 ( 3 ), 356–386 . Brown , T. M. , M. Cueto , and E. Fee ( 2006 ) ‘ The World Health Organization and the Transition from “International” to “Global” Public Health ’, American

in Global health and the new world order
Author:

International organisations are a central component of modern international society. This book provides a concise account of the principles and norms of international law applicable to the intergovernmental organisation (IGO). It defines and explains inter-governmentalism and the role of law in its regulation. The book presents case studies that show how the law works within an institutional order dominated by politics. After a note on the key relationship between the IGO and its member states, it examines the basic relationship between the UN and states in terms of membership through admissions, withdrawal, expulsion, suspension, and representation. The debate about the extent of the doctrine of legal powers is addressed through case studies. Institutional lawmaking in the modern era is discussed with particular focus on at the impact of General Assembly Resolutions on outer space and the Health Regulations of the World Health Organization. Non-forcible measures adopted by the UN and similar IGOs in terms of their legality (constitutionality and conformity to international law), legitimacy and effectiveness, is covered next. The different military responses undertaken by IGOs, ranging from observation and peacekeeping, to peace enforcement and war-fighting, are discussed in terms of legality and practice. The book also considers the idea of a Responsibility to Protect and the development of secondary rules of international law to cover the wrongful acts and omissions of IGOs. It ends with a note on how the primary and secondary rules of international law are upheld in different forms and mechanisms of accountability, including courts.

Open Access (free)
Lachlan McIver
,
Maria Guevara
, and
Gabriel Alcoba

burden of illness and deaths as a consequence of the policies and political decisions made in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic. In our view, these should be considered epidemics or, more accurately, syndemics – the clustering and interactions of two or more diseases or health conditions and socio-environmental factors – of neglect ( Fronteira et al. , 2021 ). The first category is infectious diseases that were already considered ‘neglected’ before SARS-CoV-2 appeared. The World Health Organization

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Lucy Bassett
and
J. Charles Bradley

), ‘Early Childhood Development and Early Learning for Children in Crisis and Conflict’ , Background paper prepared for the 2019 Global Education Monitoring Report : Migration, Displacement and Education: Building Bridges, Not Walls , https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000266072.locale=en (accessed 1 August 2021 ). WHO (World Health Organization), UNICEF, World Bank Group ( 2018 ), Nurturing Care Framework for Early Childhood Development: A Framework for Helping Children Survive and Thrive to Transform Health and Human Potential ( Geneva

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
A Belated but Welcome Theory of Change on Mental Health and Development
Laura Davidson

need to extend the World Health Organization’s Comprehensive Mental Health Action Plan 2013–2020 by another decade ( WHO, 2013 ). Can DfID’s document – An Approach and Theory of Change to Mental Health and Psychosocial Support – actually change anything? DfID’s Five Pathways to Change The ToC provides a conceptual framework for improving mental health globally. Its overarching vision is a world where those with

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Lessons Learned from an Intervention by Médecins Sans Frontières
Maria Ximena Di Lollo
,
Elena Estrada Cocina
,
Francisco De Bartolome Gisbert
,
Raquel González Juarez
, and
Ana Garcia Mingo

Introduction The disease caused by a hitherto unknown coronavirus, and denoted coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was designated a pandemic on 11 March 2020 ( World Health Organization, 2020a ). The first case of COVID-19 was detected in Spain on 31 January 2020, and as of August 2021 there have been more than 4,500,000 cases and over 80,000 COVID-19 deaths in the country. Given the novelty of the virus, there was a lack of basic information about the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
What Lessons Can Be Drawn from Case Studies in France, the United States and Madagascar?
Hugo Carnell

then bites a human ( World Health Organization, 2017 ). Once infection has taken place, the bacteria colonise the closest lymph gland, leading to the two key symptoms: painful round gland swellings known as buboes and dark-coloured bruises on the skin caused by internal haemorrhaging ( Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2020b ). Bubonic plague is fatal when untreated in about 50–70 per cent of cases, but this rate drops to 10–15 per cent with treatment

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Dispelling Misconceptions about Sexual Violence against Men and Boys in Conflict and Displacement
Heleen Touquet
,
Sarah Chynoweth
,
Sarah Martin
,
Chen Reis
,
Henri Myrttinen
,
Philipp Schulz
,
Lewis Turner
, and
David Duriesmith

violence against men and boys is often understood as anal rape ( Carlson, 2006 ; Chynoweth, 2018 ). The World Health Organization’s 2003 Guidelines for Medico-Legal Care for Victims of Sexual Violence state that the most common forms of conflict-related sexual violence against men are anal and oral rape and forced masturbation ( WHO, 2003 : 13). More recent publications have asserted that the most common types are forced sex acts and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
The Politics of Infectious Disease
Duncan McLean
and
Michaël Neuman

intervention in West Africa ‘had been an overwhelming success’, she is harshly critical of the results achieved in North Kivu. Much like the previous article, she points to ‘political, social and economic grievances’ that crystallised around a response where the population suffered from ‘long-standing health needs, the cancellation of the elections, and coercive practices of the armed forces and police’. However, this is hardly helped by MSF’s own contradictions in adopting the World Health Organization’s

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
What the COVID-19 Pandemic Has Shown Us about the Humanitarian Sphere’s Approach to Local Faith Engagement
Ellen Goodwin

. This lead many to experience food insecurity, protection challenges and mental health and psychosocial crises during the pandemic. In response to the varied primary and secondary impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, humanitarian organisations enacted multi-sectoral responses. For many of the international faith-inspired organisations (IFIOs) engaged with for this research, and for several international humanitarian organisations such as the World Health Organization (WHO), this

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs