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Medical culture and identity in provincial England, c.1760–1850
Author: Michael Brown

This book talks about late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century English medical culture, a study of what it meant to be a doctor and how this changed over time. It presents a brief overview of the social, economic and cultural landscape of late eighteenth-century York. Medical culture and identity in late eighteenth-century York took shape within a social landscape shaped by the values of gentility, polite sociability and civic belonging. The book examines the role of intellectual liberality, demonstrating how public displays of polite and 'ornamental' learning were central to the performance of medico-gentility. It explores the incipient demise of this culture. Through a close reading of a scandal which enveloped the York Lunatic Asylum, it also explores the ways in which medical identities founded upon gentility and politeness were critically undermined by the political and social factionalism. The book looks at medical involvement in the provincial scientific movement, examining how local medical men positioned themselves relative to the so-called 'march of intellect', the cultural and ideological alignment between science and social reform. It continues this analysis in relation to the cholera epidemic of 1832 and other medico-political activities. The book considers how the professional dominion over healthcare was forged by the dual processes of inclusion and exclusion. It discusses the foundation of the Medical School in 1834 against the trial, in the same year, of a local salesman for James Morison's 'Universal Vegetable Medicine'.

Politics, reform and the demise of medico-gentility
Michael Brown

unprofessional-like’ manner, Mather had, by his own admission, seized a poker, exclaiming, ‘If you repeat those expressions, I’ll break your head!’3 Mather had good reason to be worried. History seemed to be repeating itself. Just over five years before, a similar scandal had enveloped the York Lunatic Asylum and had resulted in the public disgrace of its principal medical officers. Between 1813 and 1815 the York Lunatic Asylum became the target of a vocal group of men who sought to reform the conditions in which the patients were held and the treatment to which they were

in Performing medicine
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Lunacy and the asylum
Alannah Tomkins

; these could offer fee bursaries or exemptions. In this way, the variety of settings ranged from the domestic through to the large-scale asylums.14 204 Medical misadventure Table 5.1  Medical patients in institutions for the insane in 1881 Institution Number of medical patients York Lunatic Asylum St Andrew’s Hospital Northampton West Riding of Yorkshire Asylum, Ecclesfield Carmarthen, Cardigan and Pembrokeshire Joint Counties Asylum Broadmoor Criminal Lunatic Asylum Middlesex County Asylum, Hanwell St Luke’s Hospital Middlesex Bethlem Hospital County or borough

in Medical misadventure in an age of professionalisation, 1780–1890
Author: Alannah Tomkins

Victorian medical men could suffer numerous setbacks on their individual paths to professionalisation, and Thomas Elkanah Hoyle's career offers a telling exemplar. This book addresses a range of the financial, professional, and personal challenges that faced and sometimes defeated the aspiring medical men of England and Wales. Spanning the decades 1780-1890, from the publication of the first medical directory to the second Medical Registration Act, it considers their careers in England and Wales, and in the Indian Medical Service. The book questions the existing picture of broad and rising medical prosperity across the nineteenth century to consider the men who did not keep up with professionalising trends. Financial difficulty was widespread in medical practice, and while there are only a few who underwent bankruptcy or insolvency identified among medical suicides, the fear of financial failure could prove a powerful motive for self-destruction. The book unpicks the life stories of men such as Henry Edwards, who could not sustain a professional persona of disinterested expertise. In doing so it uncovers the trials of the medical marketplace and the pressures of medical masculinity. The book also considers charges against practitioners that entailed their neglect, incompetence or questionable practice which occasioned a threat to patients' lives. The occurrence and reporting of violent crime by medical men, specifically serious sexual assault and murder is also discussed. A tiny proportion of medical practitioners also experienced life as a patient in an asylum.

Abstract only
Michael Brown

a scandal which enveloped the York Lunatic Asylum between 1813 and 1815 it explores the ways in which medical identities founded upon gentility and politeness were critically undermined by the political and social factionalism of the early nineteenth century. The last three chapters cover the period from 1815 until around the middle of the nineteenth century and chart the elaboration of a new culture of medicine in which practitioners shaped identities based upon expertise, professional self-identification and a political engagement with the care of the social

in Performing medicine
Medicine and the world of letters
Michael Brown

knowledge 75 death, the model of the gentleman practitioner, the medical man of letters, which he had inherited from his father and brother, had itself passed away. In the next chapter our study moves into the early nineteenth century to examine the beginnings of the demise of medico-gentility as the hegemonic model of medical identity and practice by considering the controversy which engulfed the York Lunatic Asylum between 1813 and 1815. The Asylum scandal may have been a local event, but it had national ramifications and was constitutive of a much wider historical

in Performing medicine
Social progressivism and the transformation of provincial medicine
Michael Brown

trail of his eye, to recognise whether he be of Athens or Sparta; which, being interpreted, is whether he be a Whig or a Tory? Politics are said to have estranged the once warmest of friends. This is sad and foolish work.5 Atkinson’s wistful nostalgia was understandable, for during the early nineteenth century the city of his youth and young manhood had been transformed almost beyond recognition. In 1814 he had seen his own brother’s career destroyed as the ancien régime of the York Lunatic Asylum collapsed in bitter acrimony. However, the Asylum scandal merely

in Performing medicine