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Ireland in a global world
Series: Irish Society

Migration to and from Ireland is often the subject of definitive claims. During the 1980s, migration from Ireland was most commonly described as a brain drain. Despite the constant flows and counterflows, academic studies tend to focus on just one direction of movement, reflecting dominant concerns at particular points in time. The 1950s and the 1980s are characterized as decades of emigration, the Celtic Tiger era as a period of immigration, and the current recession is manifest as a return to mass emigration. This book addresses the three key themes from a variety of spatial, temporal and theoretical perspectives. The theme of networks is addressed. Transnational loyalist networks acted both to facilitate the speaking tours of loyalist speakers and to re-translate the political meanings and messages being communicated by the speakers. The Irish Catholic Church and specifically its re-working of its traditional pastoral, lobbying and development role within Irish emigrant communities, is discussed. By highlighting three key areas such as motives, institutions and strategies, and support infrastructures, the book suggests that the Irish experience offers a nuanced understanding of the different forms of networks that exist between a state and its diaspora, and shows the importance of working to support the self-organization of the diaspora. Perceptions of belonging both pre- and postmigration encouraged ethnographic research in six Direct Provision asylum accommodation centres across Ireland. Finally, the book provides insights into the intersections between 'migrancy' and other social categories including gender, nationality and class/position in the labour hierarchy.

Negotiating identity and place in asylum seeker direct provision accommodation centres

3995 Migrations.qxd:text 5/8/13 11:39 Page 164 9 Betwixt, between and belonging: negotiating identity and place in asylum seeker direct provision accommodation centres Angèle Smith When speaking with Ilissa1 about life in Ireland in the asylum seeker direct provision accommodation centre, she explained that, ‘It will never be your real home – nothing you can do will make it your real home. But you need to make this time and place some kind of home for you, like you belong to something, otherwise you will just go mad.’ (Excerpt from field notes, A. Smith, 24

in Migrations
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Irish people still remember visits to Butlins or receiving postcards from holidaymakers with colourful images of the swimming pool, the boating lake or the American Bar. In 1982, however, the Butlins camp was sold and became Mosney Holiday Centre. Eighteen years later the camp was bought by the state and turned into an accommodation centre for asylum seekers. The odd-looking buildings that are visible from the train are now the temporary homes of an astonishing variety of people who, in many ways, do not exist. During the 1990s the numbers of people claiming asylum in

in Integration in Ireland
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Ireland and its relationship with migration

. Angèle Smith 3995 Migrations.qxd:text 10 5/8/13 11:38 Page 10 I NTRODUCTION highlights the dilemmas of belonging for asylum seekers in Ireland. Her chapter is based on ethnographic research in six Direct Provision asylum accommodation centres across Ireland. The legal, social and spatial limbo of asylum seekers forced to live in these Direct Provision centres means they constantly experience a world betwixt and between. Transnational life is frequently a life marked by experiences of simultaneously belonging and non-belonging, belonging to more than one place

in Migrations

International Theatre Project, which aimed to offer ‘legally resident migrants an opportunity to be involved in the planning and delivery of a community-based drama project’ and ‘[p]rovide a platform for Irish citizens and new migrants to participate handson in an imaginative and creative arts process within their local area’ (Hayes, 2008: 3). This project built on Upstate’s 2002 collaboration with Droichead Youth Theatre and a group of youths seeking asylum in Ireland and housed at the nearby Mosney Accommodation Centre, which is run by the Department of Justice, Equality

in Literary visions of multicultural Ireland
Exploring the experiences of migrant children in Irelandc

across the Republic of Ireland, including cities, suburbs, small towns and rural areas. A majority lived in the southwest region and in the Dublin region, while a number also lived in a range of locations in the west and north-west. They had moved from a wide range of international locations, including over twenty different countries. The 3995 Migrations.qxd:text 5/8/13 122 11:39 Page 122 B ELONGING research was conducted in children’s homes, schools, youth clubs, cafes and an asylum accommodation centre. Adults – parents, teachers and playworkers – were also

in Migrations
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freedom of movement without consequences, as local authorities regulate access to social housing. Equally, asylum seekers must live where they are housed, which could require them to move between direct provision accommodation centres at short notice. Work permits or student visas may be tied to specific employers or education institutions, and this also places a de facto restriction on internal mobility. This could have broader consequences – it could limit job opportunities or access to services, for example – but these are not formal legal restrictions. However

in Ireland and migration in the twenty-first century

of ‘dispersal’, preventing the risky concentration of racialised populations in any one urban centre, so consequently asylum seekers are warehoused in a network of privately run accommodation centres around the country. Socially excluded, spatially and physically distanced, asylum seekers are also regarded as lying beyond the scope of integration and integratibility in the absence of refugee status or some form of subsidiary protection. This system has been subject to repeated international criticism. In 2011 Thomas Hammerberg, the Human Rights Commissioner of the

in Ireland under austerity

took the microphone once again and blessed her campaign. He touched her on the head as he prayed for her success. She kept her head bowed, and a small group of women standing to one side began to sing and sway gently. Shortly after the launch ended Yinka was back canvassing on the streets with a few volunteers. She pressed flyers into the hands of passing townspeople and tried her best to bring environmental issues into the interactions as quickly as possible. A member of the catering staff from the Mosney asylum accommodation centre stopped for a while and spoke a

in Integration in Ireland

, and as a consequence new immigrant children were being excluded and forced to seek emergency school provision.6 The end result was that when Scoil Choilm Emergency Primary School opened its door that same week in Dublin 15 the overwhelming majority of its pupils were from immigrant families – and, yet, the patron was the Catholic Archdiocese of Dublin.7 Later that month, a multidenominational Educate Together school opened in Balbriggan, County Dublin, a town near to Mosney asylum seeker accommodation centre, and admitted, according to the Sunday Times, ‘80 black

in Integration in Ireland