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The performance of extremity in the 1970s

Unlimited action concerns the limits imposed upon art and life, and the means by which artists have exposed, refused or otherwise reshaped the horizon of aesthetics and of the practice of art, by way of performance art. It examines the ‘performance of extremity’ as practices at the limits of the histories of performance and art, in performance art’s most fertile and prescient decade, the 1970s. This book recounts and analyses game-changing performance events by six artists: Kerry Trengove, Ulay, Genesis P-Orridge, Anne Bean, the Kipper Kids and Stephen Cripps. Through close encounters with these six artists and their works, and a broader contextual milieu of artists and works, Johnson articulates a counter-history of actions in a new narrative of performance art in the 1970s, to rethink and rediscover the history of contemporary art and performance.

Community–university research partnerships in global perspectives

This book is based on a three-year international comparative study on poverty reduction and sustainability strategies . It provides evidence from twenty case studies around the world on the power and potential of community and higher education based scholars and activists working together in the co-creation of transformative knowledge. Opening with a theoretical overview of knowledge, democracy and action, the book is followed by analytical chapters providing lessons learned and capacity building, and on the theory and practice of community university research partnerships. It also includes lessons on models of evaluation, approaches to measuring the impact and an agenda for future research and policy recommendations. The book overviews the concept of engaged scholarship and then moves to focus on community-university research partnerships. It is based on a global empirical study of the role of community-university research partnerships within the context of poverty alleviation, the creation of sustainable societies and, broadly speaking, the Millennium Development Goals. The book frames the contribution of community-university research partnerships within a larger knowledge democracy framework, linking this practice to other spaces of knowledge democracy. These include the open access movement, new acceptance of the methods of community-based and participatory research and the call for cognitive justice or the need for epistemologies of the Global South. It takes a particular look at the variety of structures that have been created in the various universities and civil society research organizations to facilitate and enhance research partnerships.

An introduction

1 Knowledge, democracy and action: an introduction Budd L. Hall In the city where I live, Victoria, Canada, a wealthy city in a wealthy country, there are 1,500 women and men (in a population of 250,000) who do not have a place to sleep at night. In spite of the creation of a Coalition to End Homelessness, the numbers of people who suffer from poor health, violence, substance abuse as a result of poverty and homelessness continues at about the same level. In India, one of the fastest-growing economies in the world, 600 million people live without literacy

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, as well as an atavistic sensibility, inside his commitments to art. Ulay tells me, ‘I certainly carried out a criminal act. I was, at the very least, a thief. And it’s a strange thief who surrenders. I was put in prison’ (Johnson 2015: 22). The criminal act in question is the core of There is a Criminal Touch to Art (Da ist eine kriminelle Beruhrung in der Kunst), in which Ulay stole a nationally significant painting from the Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin in 1976. A performance action – and thus a work of art in its own right – his pilfering of Carl Spitzweg’s oil

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the law and the media, in the name of a spuriously defended public good, came down with prohibitive and punitive force upon COUM’s artistic activities in the 1970s demonstrates both the seeming obscenity of the group’s coercion and regulation and the firebrand novelty, surprise and importance of COUM’s actions. P-Orridge writes, ‘COUM is a search for temporary definitions. A series ov arbitrary statements fixing in more concrete terms thee eternal, non-existent paradox of time, for no reason’ (P-Orridge 2000: 65).3 As an ethos or sensibility, COUM remained

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high-quality participatory practices and processes globally through the work of students, alumni and a variety of partnerships with individuals and institutions worldwide. It is grounded in a process of critical reflection on experience and combines residential intensivestudy periods with a longer period of action research in a work-based placement. (2008, p. 366) The course turns on the concept of praxis. The basic premise is that experienced practitioners and activists come to IDS for one residential term (ten weeks), on a short leave of absence from work

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Santa Cruz. At a national level, activities were coordinated by the Vice-Ministry of Biodiversity, Forest Resources and Environment. The project established a management unit in the area to manage the project and coordinate technical assistance. Thus, collaborative research coordination for social action was established in this unit. The project involved a wide range of participants. To facilitate the adoption of a research–action approach, project coordination was undertaken by a CEBEM researcher. This facilitated the establishment of strategies for monitoring social

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achieving these goals. Each partner equitably contributes their expertise and shares responsibility and ownership to enhance understanding, integrate the knowledge gained, with action to improve the well-being of community members and foster sustainable development. Building linkages between research and community development Context This study was a collaboration between Mountain Development Research Centre (MDRC) of Hemwati Nandan Bahuguna Garhwal University (HNBGU), Srinagar, Uttarakhand; Himalayan Action Research Centre (HARC); and Participatory Research in Asia (PRIA

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Open Access (free)
A project on alcohol and older people in Brighton

20 Cheers!? A project on alcohol and older  people in Brighton Juliet Millican and Angie Hart Context The project originated from a partnership between Age Concern Brighton, Hove and Portslade; Brighton and Hove Drug and Alcohol Action Team; and Brighton and Hove City Council – Social Care, facilitated by CUPP at the University of Brighton. The concern was an increase in the number of older people using their services who may have problems with alcohol. Partners were aware of a lack of local evidence and also a lack of services specifically for older people with

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9 Student community engagement for employability and entrepreneurship in Senegal Lamine Kane, Aliou Guissé and Latyr Diouf History After connecting online, Lamine Kane of the sub-Saharan Africa Participatory Action Research Network (REPAS) and Juliet Millican from the University of Brighton used a travel grant from the British Council to meet for exploratory discussions in Dakar with members of REPAS, the Department of Applied Economics (ENEA) at Cheikh Diop University (UCAD), and nearby local communities. These discussions led to the joint preparation of a

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