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Sean Nixon

1 The advertising industry in the age of affluence W hen London Life, the fashionable magazine edited by Mark Boxer, the founding editor of the Sunday Times colour section, threw a party to mark the opening of the GPO tower in central London in May 1966, it invited a number of advertising people among a guest list that included the fashion photographer Terence Donovan, the designer Ossie Clarke, the pop artists Peter Blake and David Hockney, the model/actress Una Stubbs and the musician Georgie Fame.1 The inclusion of advertising people in this gathering of the

in Hard sell
The work of Ishioka Eiko and Suzuki Hachirō
Ory Bartal

2 The 1968 social uprising and subversive advertising design in Japan: the work of Ishioka Eiko and Suzuki Hachirō The economic miracle of the 1960s gave a boost to the commercial advertising and graphic design industry, leading to what can be considered the first golden age of graphic design and advertising in postwar Japan.1 At the beginning of the decade, advertisements were heavily influenced by the International Style of the 1950s. However, the atmosphere changed after the 1965 exhibition of Belle Époque posters curated by the collector Katsumie Masaru

in Critical design in Japan
Anandi Ramamurthy

-historical context’ and ‘criticises forms of culture that foster subordination’. 1 The choice of advertising has not been accidental. Advertising is a form of cultural production that permeates every aspect of our lives. Advertising bombards us from every direction, on the streets, in our homes and in the magazines we buy and read. Although the level of bombardment has increased throughout the twentieth century

in Imperial persuaders
Katy Layton-Jones

B4B Advertising the town Distant prospects, panoramas, and guidebook illustrations continued to be produced throughout the nineteenth century. However, by the 1840s, perhaps the most ubiquitous and accessible form of urban imagery was that produced to advertise and promote the interests of individual manufactories, warehouses, and merchants. Bills of trade, trade cards, newspaper advertisements, and even free gifts were produced and circulated in ever greater numbers. Accordingly, a full appreciation of how the ‘new’ values of large-scale manufacturing and

in Beyond the metropolis
Anandi Ramamurthy

In the period prior to 1914, images of black people and Empire in commodity advertising represent the conflicting ideological interests of companies. They highlight the different attitudes and approaches of companies to colonial policy and imperialised labour relations. During this period, it appears to have been private enterprise, rather than the government, that was powerful

in Imperial persuaders
Anandi Ramamurthy

for its emphasis on labour – a rare feature in advertising, where labour is usually denied. This emphasis on labour was only possible because of the contemporary belief in racial hierarchy. Just like soap and cocoa, tea was branded and packaged for the first time during the 1880s. Unlike the other two products, however, it retains aspects of its colonial identity even today. The advertising of tea

in Imperial persuaders
Anandi Ramamurthy

This chapter will explore the effect of the specific material interests of soap manufacturers, their consumers, and the general political climate of the period on the representation of black people. While soap was by no means the only product which represented Empire and black people in late nineteenth-century advertising, soap companies made the most extensive use of

in Imperial persuaders
Anandi Ramamurthy

For cocoa manufacturers the period of pacification and consolidation was marked by support for what became known as indirect rule in West Africa. This support is apparent both from the kind of images of Africans depicted in cocoa advertising during the first decade of the twentieth century and from the frequency with which such images were used. As we have seen, soap firms repeatedly used

in Imperial persuaders
Anandi Ramamurthy

directed from the outside. 12 The representation of neo-colonialism through the espousing of modernisation theory is apparent in all the images produced by corporate firms during the 1950s and early 1960s. Dominant representations Four particular types of imagery dominate corporate advertising during this period. The first could

in Imperial persuaders
Abstract only
Advertising, affluence and transatlantic relations, c. 1951–69
Author: Sean Nixon

Advertising agencies were important conduits through which the norms of American consumption travelled eastwards across the Atlantic. This book explores the institutional developments in British advertising and the wider shape of the market for advertising services in the 1950s and 1960s. It details the growing internationalism of the advertising industry in Britain, including the increased presence of US-owned agencies in London and deals with the concern with the apparent 'Americanization'of British commerce. Considering its relationship with its parent company, the book explores the dynamics of Anglo-American advertising relations within the J Walter Thompson (JWT) company. It looks at the uses and development of market research within JWT London and allied companies, and examines the techniques that were used to generate ways of understanding the 'mass housewife'. It was the legacy of British documentary film making which helped to give a distinctive British character and feel to many of the early TV commercials produced in the 1950s and 1960s. The book explores the ways in which TV advertising focused on commercials which promoted washing powders, washing machines and convenience foods. It considers the reception of advertising by cultural critics and by those concerned with the broader governance of commercial life and consumption. The advertising people offered a positive and spirited defence of the role they performed and the pleasures of mass consumption in the age of affluence. For critics, advertising was seen as a harbinger of American 'hard sell' techniques of salesmanship within British business.