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Introducing contingency and that which did not happen as necessary and revealing conditions both of Romanticism itself and of our critical relationship with it, Counterfactual Romanticism explores the affordances of counterfactualism as a heuristic and as an imaginative tool. Innovatively extending counterfactual thought experiments from history and the social sciences to literary historiography and literary criticism and theory, the volume reveals the ways in which the shapes of Romanticism are conditioned by that which did not come to pass. Exploring – and creatively performing – various modalities of counterfactual speculation and inquiry across a range of Romantic-period authors, genres and concerns, and identifying the Romantic credentials of counterfactual thought, the introduction and eleven chapters in this collection offer a radical new purchase on literary history, on the relationship between history and fiction, on our historicist methods to date – and thus on the Romanticisms we (think we) have inherited. Counterfactual Romanticism provides a ground-breaking method of re-reading literary pasts and our own reading presents; in the process, literary production, texts and reading practices are unfossilised and defamiliarised. To emancipate the counterfactual imagination and embrace the counterfactual turn and its provocations is to reveal the literary multiverse and quantum field within which our far-from-inevitable literary inheritance is located.

Damian Walford Davies

), provides a better pathway into The Recess – a text we should not read mimetically as the imitation of an action, but narratologically, as opening up the very logics of reading. My aim, then, is to use The Recess to reflect on the epistemology of the counterfactual as something more elusive and dynamic than simply a possible world on the model of romance. For unlike Valperga, where Euthanasia’s alternate history has a specific content defeated by real history, The Recess is about the form rather than the content of the counterfactual. Female history is too criss

in Counterfactual Romanticism
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Looking across the borderlands of art, media and visual culture
Author: Anna Dahlgren

Travelling images critically examines the migrations and transformations of images as they travel between different image communities. It consists of four case studies covering the period 1870–2010 and includes photocollages, window displays, fashion imagery and contemporary art projects. Through these four close-ups it seeks to reveal the mechanisms, nature and character of these migration processes, and the agents behind them, as well as the sites where they have taken place. The overall aim of this book is thus to understand the mechanisms of interfacing events in the borderlands of the art world. Two key arguments are developed in the book, reflected by its title Travelling images. First, the notion of travel and focus on movements and transformations signal an emphasis on the similarities between cultural artefacts and living beings. The book considers ‘the social biography’ and ‘ecology’ of images, but also, on a more profound level, the biography and ecology of the notion of art. In doing so, it merges perspectives from art history and image studies with media studies. Consequently, it combines a focus on the individual case, typical for art history and material culture studies with a focus on processes and systems, on continuities and ruptures, and alternate histories inspired by media archaeology and cultural historical media studies. Second, the central concept of image is in this book used to designate both visual conventions, patterns or contents and tangible visual images. Thus it simultaneously consider of content and materiality.

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Counterfactual Romanticism
Damian Walford Davies

. The latter range from seventeenth- and early-eighteenth-century anti-determinist philosophico-theological speculation to critical military history, legal theory and nineteenth- and twentieth-century n ­ arrative forms of ‘alternate history’ (to which numerous modes of speculative fiction belong) and to which, as Karen Hellekson reminds us, those other terms, ‘allohistory’ and ‘uchronia’, are related.9 ‘Counterfactual thought experiments in narrating history’ in a military context reveal knowledge that will be of service in ‘future planning’; today, Gallagher notes

in Counterfactual Romanticism
Scott, Banim, Galt and Mitford
Damian Walford Davies

this era and often stands in for what would later be termed counterfactual. ‘Speculation’ appears in the opening sentence of Isaac D’Israeli’s ‘Of a History of Events Which Have Not Happened’, an essay that could be considered the first explicit discussion of counterfactual historio­ graphy. It remains central to this sub-genre a century later, as shown by J. C. Squire’s introduction to If It Had Happened Otherwise: Lapses Into Imaginary History (1931), a now-classic collection of essays in alternate history, where he describes the contents of the volume as

in Counterfactual Romanticism
Counterfactual Romanticism and the aesthetics of contingency
Damian Walford Davies

?”: Reflections on the Function of Alternate History’, History and Theory, 41:4 (December 2002), 91.  9 Martin Bunzl, ‘Counterfactual History: A User’s Guide’, The American Historical Review, 109:3 (June 2004), 845. 10 Rosenfeld, ‘Why Do We Ask “What If?” ’, 93. 11 Niall Ferguson, ‘Introduction: Towards a “Chaotic” Theory of the Past’, in Niall Ferguson (ed.), Virtual History: Alternatives and Counterfactuals (New York: Basic Books, 1997), p. 86 (italics in the original). 12 Ibid., p. 89. 13 Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Touching Feeling: Affect, Pedagogy, Performance (Durham, NC

in Counterfactual Romanticism
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Laughing at Livingstone?
Justin D. Livingstone

knowledge of sexual protection, the effects would be far-reaching: the ‘contagion’ would spread from illicit union to the marriage bed, right ‘from the lowest Whitechapel doxy up to the throne itself’. 224 In this alternate history, the greatest manifestations of British power would instead become an Achilles heel. The technological advances of the industrial revolution and global imperial networks would

in Livingstone’s ‘Lives’
Sustainability in Kim Stanley Robinson’s Science in the Capital trilogy
Chris Pak

shadow of the future made all the difference’ 163 images of the past and future, as is attested by his alternate history about a world where the European population is eradicated by the Black Death, The Years of Rice and Salt (2003), and his recent prehistoric novel, Shaman: A Novel of the Ice Age (2013). The images of the past and of the future in these works of sf are historical constructs that tell us more about their contemporary moment than they do about either the past or the future. Robinson has long been concerned with sustainable and unsustainable futures

in Literature and sustainability
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The day the Government fell
Timothy Noël Peacock

development in light of the British tradition of minority government. Accepting the risks of considering alternate history or counterfactual outcomes, it is worth highlighting some of the choices that were faced by the Government when handling the no confidence issue, to evaluate the potential calculations that may have influenced contemporary strategy-makers. Initially we will consider the Government’s efforts to avoid the vote, the response of both the Government and Opposition, and the weighing up of formal approaches to other parties or individual initiatives to secure

in The British tradition of minority government
Mary Wollstonecraft’s Frankenstein
Damian Walford Davies

/full (accessed 25 May 2017). 3 See Gordon, Vindication, pp. 358–9. 4 Karen Hellekson, The Alternate History: Refiguring Historical Time (Kent, OH: The Kent State University Press, 2001), p. 5. 5 Gordon, Vindication, p. 361. 6 Richard Ned Lebow, ‘What’s So Different About A Counterfactual?’, 188 Counterfactual obstetrics World Politics, 52:4 (July 2000), 550, 566, 569; and see Philip E. Tetlock and Aaron Belkin, ‘Counterfactual Thought Experiments’, in Tetlock and Belkin (eds), Counterfactual Thought Experiments in World Politics: Logical, Methodological, and

in Counterfactual Romanticism