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seen as a pioneer equally of modern Scottish Nationalism, of British socialism and of Scots anti-colonialism. Not ‘only’ a politician, he was also a writer of some repute, and a traveller of infinite resource, whose interests and engagements embraced the whole British-imperial world and far beyond. Very few people – arguably, nobody in Britain up to that time – assailed the

in Scotland, empire and decolonisation in the twentieth century

Vietnamese anti-colonialism v 2 v Vietnamese anti-colonialism and the Personalist critique of capitalism and liberal democracy Personalism: Between capitalism and communism The stateless conception of communism espoused by the leaders of the early Republic was partly derived from the philosophy of Personalism, developed by the French philosopher, Emmanuel Mounier. This philosophy, which is commonly treated in a cursory manner in the historical scholarship on the war, was widely dismissed by US officials as “muddleheaded” and “vague,”1 a “mish-mash of ideas

in The unimagined community
Open Access (free)
An Excerpt from Bill V. Mullen’s New Biography, James Baldwin: Living in Fire, and an Interview with the Author

This excerpt from James Baldwin: Living in Fire details a key juncture in Baldwin’s life, 1957–59, when he was transformed by a visit to the South to write about the civil rights movement while grappling with the meaning of the Algerian Revolution. The excerpt shows Baldwin understanding black and Arab liberation struggles as simultaneous and parallel moments in the rise of Third World, anti-colonial and anti-racist U.S. politics. It also shows Baldwin’s emotional and psychological vulnerability to repressive state violence experienced by black and Arab citizens in the U.S., France, and Algiers.

James Baldwin Review

This paper questions the extent to which the (arguable) end of the liberal humanitarian order is something to be mourned. Suggesting that current laments for the decline of humanitarianism reflect a Eurocentric worldview, it calls for a fundamental revision of the assumptions informing humanitarian scholarship. Decoloniality and anti-colonialism should be taken seriously so as to not reproduce the same by a different name after the end of the liberal order.

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

The relationship between Scotland and the British Empire in the twentieth century was wide-ranging. This book represents ground-breaking research in the field of Scotland's complex and often-changing relationship with the British Empire in the period. The contours of Scottish intercontinental migration were significantly redrawn during the twentieth century as a consequence of two world wars. The book reveals the apparent means used to assess the complexities of linking places of birth to migration and to various modern attempts to appeal to ethnic diasporas. The strange case of jute brings out some paradoxical dimensions to Scotland's relationship with England and the empire in the twentieth century. The book argues that the Scottish immigrants' perceptions of class, race and gender were equally important for interpreting the range of their experiences in the British Columbia. The mainstay of organised anti-colonialist critique and mobilisation, in Scotland lay in socialist and social democratic groups. The book examines how the Scottish infantry regiments, and their popular and political constituencies, responded to rapidly reducing circumstances in the era of decolonisation. Newspapers such as The Scotsman, The Glasgow Herald, and the Daily Record brought Africa to the Scottish public with their coverage of Mau Mau insurgency and the Suez Crisis. The book looks into the Scottish cultural and political revival by examining the contributions of David Livingstone. It also discusses the period of the Hamilton by-election of 1967 and the three referenda of 1979, 1997 and 2014 on devolution and independence.

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The British far left from 1956
Editors: Evan Smith and Matthew Worley

This book explores the role of the far left in British history from the mid-1950s until the present. It highlights the impact made by the far left on British politics and society. The book first looks at particular strands of the far left in Britain since the 1950s. It then looks at various issues and social movements such as Trotskyism, anti-revisionism and anarchism, that the left engaged (or did not engage) with, such as women's liberation, gay liberation, anti-colonialism, anti-racism and anti-fascism. The book focuses on how the wider British left, in the Labour Party and amongst the intelligentsia, encountered Trotskyism between the 1930s and 1960s. The Socialist Party (SP) and the Socialist Workers Party (SWP) traditions have proven to be the most durable and high profile of all of Britain's competing Trotskyist tendencies. Their opponents in the International Marxist Group and the Socialist Labour League/Workers' Revolutionary Party (SLL/WRP) each met limited success and influence in the labour movement and wider social movements. The SWP and Militant/SP outlived the 'official' Communist Party of Great Britain and from the collapse of the Soviet Union to the present day have continued to influence labour movement and wider politics, albeit episodically. The book is concerned with providing an overview of their development, dating from the end of the Second World War to the onset of the 2009 economic crisis.

Internationalism, anti-militarism and war

Anti-militarism is today an unquestioned mainstay of anarchism. This book presents a systematic analysis of anarchist responses to the First World War. It examines the interventionist debate between Peter Kropotkin and Errico Malatesta which split the anarchist movement in 1914. The controversy revolved around conflicting interpretations of the shared ideas of internationalism and anti-militarism. The book analyses the debates conducted in European and American movements about class, nationalism, pacifism and cultural resistance. Just as Kropotkin's position was coherent with his anarchist beliefs, it was also a product of his rejection of the main assumptions of the peace politics of his day. Malatesta's dispute with Kropotkin provides a focus for the anti-interventionist campaigns he fought internationally. Contributions discuss the justness of war, non-violence and pacifism, anti-colonialism, pro-feminist perspectives on war and the potency of myths about the war and revolution for the reframing of radical politics in the 1920s and beyond. The collaboration between the Swiss-based anarchists and the Indian nationalists suggests that Bertoni's group was not impervious to collaboration with groups whose ideological tenets may have been in tension with the ideology of anarchism. During the First World War, American anarchists emphasised the positive, constructive aspects of revolutionary violence by aestheticising it as an outgrowth of individual creativity. Divisions about the war and the experience of being caught on the wrong side of the Bolshevik Revolution encouraged anarchists to reaffirm their deeply-held rejection of vanguard socialism and develop new strategies on anti-war activities.

Spencer, Krishnavarma, and The Indian Sociologist

on The Indian Sociologist (IS hereafter), a radical anti-​colonial journal created, edited and published by Krishnavarma from 1905–​ 14 and 1921–​22 that, for a time, was an important mouthpiece of the early (pre-​Gandhian) Indian nationalist movement’s extremist faction at the international level.2 I will argue that, in the pages of the IS, Krishnavarma developed an anti-​colonialism that was deeply critical of the quietism of Indian liberalism (espoused by early Congress moderates), avoided the nativism of his fellow extremists, and resisted the romanticized

in Colonial exchanges
Exile from French North Africa

articles critical of the sultan’s treatment. 25 Mohammed maintained contact, directly and through intermediaries, with the Istiqlal Party at home, where the situation was becoming dire. His banishment and the installation of Arafa, rather than quelling discontent, had aggravated unrest and stoked anti-colonialism. Armed attacks, explosions and arson took place with increasing

in Banished potentates
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The anti-colonial roots of American anarchist debates during the First World War

violating the Anarchist Exclusion Act, and jumped bail to escape to Europe. Land and Liberty was left in the hands of its editor, the Indian-born English anarchist William C. Owen. A veteran California radical, Owen was an ardent supporter of both Indian independence and Mexico’s anarchist Partido Liberal Mexicano (PLM), and edited the English-language page of the PLM’s paper, Regeneración.20 In Land and Liberty, he proclaimed an unambiguous commitment to anti-colonialism: ‘Wherever men or women battle for freedom they will find in us a champion, whether that battle is in

in Anarchism, 1914–18