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Jean R. Brink

as his’. 4 Hadfield concludes: ‘We are presented with a fundamental dilemma: either take what appears in the literary works as evidence of the poet's life or abandon any quest for that life and declare that it is unwritable’ (12). Like many who have patiently awaited an archival discovery, the veritable smoking gun that will make all clear about a sixteenth-century figure, I have grappled with the challenge

in The early Spenser, 1554–80
A challenge to the Festival
Florence March

ex machina in As You Like It . I constituted my research object by confronting sources as varied as video and tape recordings (whenever possible), photos, programmes, press packs and reviews, working notes, correspondence and interviews. Although Vilar's productions are the oldest performances in the corpus , they rank among the best documented projects for Vilar was already well aware of the importance of data archiving to build up a budding history of the Avignon Festival. 1

in Shakespeare and the supernatural
Abstract only
Josette Bushell-Mingo’s Cleopatra, Royal Exchange, Manchester, 2005; Tarell Alvin McCraney’s ‘radical edit’, Royal Shakespeare Company, The Public and GableStage, 2013
Carol Chillington Rutter

). 4 By then, the photo-call had been held and the production had been photographed. The archive, possessing only these images, does not record the stunning look of the Cleopatra whom Bushell-Mingo actually played. 5 See https://www.thestage.co.uk/features/interviews/2017/josette-bushell-mingo-id-love-to-come-back-and-lead-a-company-or-run-a-building/ (accessed 6 January 2020

in Antony and Cleopatra
Jean R. Brink

, the assumption seems to have been made that everything that could be known about Spenser's early life had been reported, but, now that we are computerizing our archives, there is every likelihood that new records will be discovered. There is no reason to salvage either an aristocratic or a middle-class Spenser. Some puzzles, such as Spenser's precise lineage, are best left unresolved until we are sure that we have sufficient evidence to draw

in The early Spenser, 1554–80
Jean R. Brink

. 2 Mark H. Curtis, Oxford and Cambridge in Transition, 1558–1642 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1959), 180–1. 3 Cambridge University manuscripts associated with Langherne (Langhorne) seemed to offer no information on Spenser, but Edmonton archives might prove more useful

in The early Spenser, 1554–80
Spenser’s Busirane and Donne’s ‘A Valediction of my name, in the window’
Yulia Ryzhik

(London: J.M. Dent &Sons, 1985), 70. Subsequent references are to this edition. 2 Donne’s signature is preserved in the ‘marriage letters’, the correspondence between the poet and his father-in-law, George More, in the Folger Shakespeare Library digital archive. The ‘ragged bony’ autograph evokes the skeletal image that Donne conjures in his poem: http://luna.folger.edu/luna/servlet/detail/FOLGERCM1~6~6~32007~102238:John-Donne-s-marriage-letters-inth?sort=call_number%2Cmpsortorder1%2Ccd_title%2Cimprint&qvq=q:donne’s%2Bmarriage%2Bletters

in Spenser and Donne
Shakespeare’s Globe, 1999
Carol Chillington Rutter

1 Screenplay by Tom Stoppard in collaboration with Marc Norman; directed by John Madden (Universal Pictures, 1998). 2 This, and other performance materials for the production including an archive video of a live performance, are held in Shakespeare's Globe Library & Archive, London. 3

in Antony and Cleopatra
Antony and Cleopatra, 1677–1931
Carol Chillington Rutter

only months before. Era reported as the new festival season opened that Bridges-Adams was looking ‘forward to several of the plays being produced with the freshness attaching to a new play’. New play? How revolutionary! ‘For example, in Antony and Cleopatra the Roman dressing will be subject to an admixture of costume contemporaneous with the poet’ (8 April 1931). Only a handful of studio portraits survives in the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust archives for this production. They show Gyles Isham's Antony in regulation Roman gear: peplum, toga

in Antony and Cleopatra
Abstract only
Spenser, Donne, and the trouble of periodization
Yulia Ryzhik

, especially in the heyday of deconstruction. 12 Donne studies have, of necessity, focused on manuscripts, archival research, and textual criticism, and the ongoing project of the Donne Variorum highlights the enormity and complexity of the task. 13 The Oxford Handbook devotes its entire first section to research tools and resources in Donne studies, approximately 11 per cent of the total page count excluding the frontmatter and index. Spenser studies, by contrast, have focused on publication history, which takes up 5.7 per cent of the page count in its respective

in Spenser and Donne
The poetics of the Epithalamia
Yulia Ryzhik

Veneris , trans. F.W. Cornish, J. Postgate, J.W. Mackail, rev. G.P. Goold (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1913), Poem LXI, lines 8, 165–6, 224–8. 10 Thomas M. Greene, ‘Spenser and the Epithalamic Convention’, Comparative Literature , 9.3 (1957 Summer), 215–28. 11 George Puttenham, The Arte of English Poesie ( London, 1569), 41. Electronic text available at http://web.archive.org/web/20081012044941/ http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/PutPoes.html . All references to Puttenham are to this

in Spenser and Donne