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The development and design of the city 1660–1720

This book is about the making of London in the period 1660-1720. This period saw the beginnings of a new understanding of built form and a transitional stage in the transmission and articulation of that form in design procedures. The book discusses the processes and methods by which the development of the city was financed and organized. It considers the leading developers and questions to what extent the traditional model which attributes responsibility for the development of London to aristocratic landlords is a viable one. The book looks at the structure of the building industry and assesses how it was adapted to meet the demands of the production of speculative housing on a scale and at a pace never previously experienced. It outlines how concepts concerning the form of the new terraces were communicated and transmitted through the building chain and finally realized in the built product. The book focuses on the discipline of architectural history and is primarily concerned with architectural and urban design issues. It talks about drawings as the sum of an architect's oeuvre, rather than the buildings, or the drawings and the buildings together. The book provides information on the style and layout of the new developments and explores the extent to which they can be categorized as a 'modernizing' phenomenon.

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Constructing Classicism: architecture in an age of commerce
Elizabeth McKellar

city was financed and organized. It considers the leading developers and questions to what extent the traditional model which attributes responsibility for the development of London to aristocratic landlords is a viable one. It looks at the structure of the building industry and assesses how this was adapted to meet the demands of the production of speculative housing on a scale and at a pace never

in The birth of modern London
Food and wine as cultural signifiers
Brian Murphy

. Many of these restaurants were often considered as being out of the reach of the majority of Irish people and as the preserve of the well-­to-­do, perhaps a throwback to much earlier decades when a servile attitude prevailed among Ireland’s working classes when it came to their aristocratic landlords of the past. Dishes and food items now common in the modern middle-­ class lexicon were absent. For the majority, it was a time when coffee came from a jar or, if you were lucky, from a cafetière pot. Plates of food were considered satisfactory if piled high. Service was

in From prosperity to austerity
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Economic matters
Carey Fleiner

afield, for example in Greece against the Macedonians. As these wars dragged on and were so far away, soldiers were away from home for much longer periods of time. They left their families behind to maintain their land, but oftentimes they returned home to discover that their farms had been lost due to a financial crisis. Invariably, these little farms were purchased by wealthy aristocratic landlords and consolidated into the great latifundia , landed estates sometimes dedicated to one or another major type of crop (see Chapter 2 on the Mediterranean triad

in A writer’s guide to Ancient Rome
Jeffrey Richards

loving, sentimentalised evocation of Old Ireland, a land drenched in tradition and noblesse oblige. It is an idealised land of penurious but good-hearted aristocratic landlords, innocent young lovers, faithful retainers and loyal tenants. Community feeling is encapsulated in the bustling details of market day in the little country town. The picture is one of a peaceful

in ‘An Irish Empire’?
Simon James Morgan

between aristocratic landlords on one hand and labourers and tenant farmers on the other. Arriving in Devon in April 1839, Acland published a bullish address, declaring ‘that the South-western counties constitute the strongholds of ignorance – and believing for myself that, as rich soil in bad hands, they are prolific in the rank weeds of misconception only because of the blindness of their aristocratic mis leaders, I venture to unfold the banner of Free Trade in this capital of Devon, in the hope that I shall be enabled to eradicate some of the many roots of error

in Celebrities, heroes and champions
Matthew Schultz

maintains far-reaching influence over contemporary science fiction, fantasy, and horror narratives. But despite its popular success, its fantastic supernatural elements (the shape-shifting count), and its sensationalism (a trio of sexually aggressive vampireses), Dracula also articulates serious sociopolitical agendas. As Raphael Ingelbien points out,17 the Count has been read by Irish Studies scholars such as Terry Eagleton and Seamus Deane as an aristocratic landlord of the failing Protestant Ascendancy, incapable of transitioning into modernity (1089); conversely

in Haunted historiographies
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The role of popular culture between the wars
Christine Grandy

films offered all ranges of the middle classes the opportunity to read about and gaze upon themselves, and the working classes the potential to look ever upward. Largely absent from popular film and fiction were representations of the contemporary aristocracy. They rarely appeared, particularly in American films, signalling that the era of aristocratic landlords was not to be idealised in popular culture. When the landed gentry did appear in British products they were treated with a reverence that the nineteenth century did not afford them. With the exception of the

in Heroes and happy endings