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Expanding geopolitical imaginations
Jen Bagelman

representations of ‘the’ refugee. Collectively, I suggest, these practices might be understood and theorised as diverse forms of ‘sanctuary artivism’. Drawing on writings by Hannah Arendt, bell hooks, Audrey Lorde and M. K. Asante, I argue that although this artivism may speak to, influence, and shape sanctuary initiatives and government policies, it is a form of politics that – importantly – exceeds these fields. In this chapter I am particularly concerned with the political affect of these forms of sanctuary artivism. When

in Sanctuary cities and urban struggles
Fashion, textiles, and gender in Asia in the long twentieth century

Threads of globalization: fashion, textiles, and gender in Asia in the long twentieth century represents the first collection of its kind devoted to imbrications of gender, textiles/fashion, labor, and heritage across Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, the Philippines, China, Taiwan, Japan, the diaspora) during the long twentieth century. This richly illustrated interdisciplinary volume situates the production of fashion (specific garments, motifs, materials, and methods of production) at the nexus between modernity, tradition, and identity, bringing these factors into Pan-Asian dialogue. Exploring the impact of textiles and garments on both national and local cultural identity, as well as gender identity and personal expression, Threads of globalization also investigates how garment and textile production has influenced the creative agency of women. The final section examines examples of ‘artivism’ (art + activism) that critique the often-gendered structural violence and environmental impacts of the global fashion industry. Threads of Globalization’s uniquely interdisciplinary contributors – scholars of art history, history, fashion, anthropology, and curators working across Asia – provide a fresh and timely inquiry into these intersectional topics from the late nineteenth century to today.

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Stitching together gender, textile and garment labor, and heritage in Asia
Melia Belli Bose

the final section, ‘Creative Voices for Change: Textiles, Gender, and Artivism,’ present works of visual art from South Asia (or its diaspora) referencing textiles or actual fibers as synecdoches of the global textile/fashion industry and its devastating impacts on local economies, the working conditions of its producers, the environment, and systemic racism. ‘“Artivism” is a hybrid neologism that signifies work created by individuals who see an organic relationship between art and activism’, notes scholar of Chicana Studies

in Threads of globalization
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An interview with David Antonio Cruz
Bénédicte Miyamoto
and
Marie Ruiz

I’ll Turn the Corner and I’ll Be Ready For It  (2019) at Monique Meloche’s gallery in Chicago.  At the time of the interview, David Antonio Cruz was working on his extended series of paintings  wegivesomuchandgivenothingatall, paintings for Richard , an homage to trans people murdered since 2017, which would become the basis for his 2019 show at Monique Meloche’s gallery. He explained to us that his artivism was first expressed in the  Chocolate Series  he painted in 2015, a reaction to the intense backlash against immigration in America.  The  Chocolate

in Art and migration
Power dynamics disclosed in Tania Bruguera’s Endgame
Luz María Sánchez Cardona

gestures In order to help us understand her art practice while trying to avoid confusion and reduction, Bruguera developed ‘theoretical terms’ such as ‘Arte de Conducta [Behavior Art], Political Timing Specific Art, Arte Útil [Useful Art], Est-Ética [Aest-ethics]’ and the ‘borrowed’ term ‘Artivism’ (Bishop, 2020 ). It constitutes an attempt to discuss her artwork outside of genres and mediums. For Patricia Phelps de Cisneros, these terms invoke an art that

in Beckett’s afterlives
An interview with Marina Galvani
Bénédicte Miyamoto
and
Marie Ruiz

towards artworks with a social content from emerging countries. We are increasingly lending to other UN institutions, and now some museums, and our mission is better understood now as being the face of development. Editors: Would you see the Art Program as participating in artivism? Marina Galvani: We still have to be supported by the institution. One of the first exhibitions that I curated at the Art Program was on theatre activism in Eastern Europe, but was a mixed success – although I still think it should have been a great event. We invited theoreticians from

in Art and migration
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The topos of/for a post-politics of images?
Anne-Laure Amilhat Szary

prove that a performative dynamic of artistic activism or “artivism”’ (Holmes, 2009 )? Does it really answer a ‘real need to break with the existing order’ (Helias and Jouffroy, 1990 , quoted by Jimenez, 2005 : 276)? At the border, might art no longer speak out by representing a socio-political situation of domination, but by highlighting the aesthetic forces of geopolitical mechanisms and, in so doing, subverting them? In this chapter, I will first present how contemporary works at borders have increased in number and, in so doing, demonstrate

in Border images, border narratives
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Dilara Begum Jolly’s garment factory-themed art
Melia Belli Bose

and Bangladeshi artivists are creating textile-based work that highlights the similarities between these two disasters (‘Uncomfortable Quilts: Textile-Based Artivism in Response to Bangladeshi Garment Factory Disasters,’ South Asian History and Culture , forthcoming). 8 ‘Empathy’ is an imprecise word in English and there is widespread disagreement regarding its exact definition. Here, I refer to the term’s affective capacity: the visceral sharing of another’s psychological and

in Threads of globalization
Rescaling migration, citizenship, and rights
Jonathan Darling
and
Harald Bauder

. Here Hudson highlights the tensions of governmentality and regulation that have shaped the limits of what sanctuary can mean, and Atak examines the experiences of those tasked with enacting sanctuary through policy, illustrating the tensions and possibilities in the gap between political aspiration and reality. In the final chapter of Part I, Jen Bagelman examines sanctuary through a more intimate lens, and considers how a variety of creative and cultural practices of ‘artivism’ convey claims to sanctuary below and beyond the horizon of urban policy making

in Sanctuary cities and urban struggles
Urban citizenship struggles and the racialised outsider
Ben Rogaly

geographies of citizenship’, Progress in human geography, 36:5 (2012), 628. 29 Darling, ‘Acts, ambiguities and the labour of contesting citizenship’, p. 728. 30 Patricia Ehrkamp, ‘Geographies of migration II: the racial-spatial politics of immigration’, Progress in human geography, 43:2 (2019), 363–375. 31 Darling, ‘Acts, ambiguities and the labour of contesting citizenship’, pp. 730–731; see also Jen Bagelman, ‘Sanctuary artivism: expanding geopolitical imaginations’, in Jonathan Darling and Harald Bauder (eds), Sanctuary Cities and Urban Struggles: Rescaling

in Stories from a migrant city