Edward Perry Warren and Lewes House
John Potvin

attempted to recreate and deploy classical Greek notions of pederastic love and same-sex desire as a model for sexual and civic virtue. 2 To date very little scholarship exists on queer experiences of the domestic and even less on the spatialized dimension of askesis and the domesticated aesthetic programme of ideal Greek love. Askesis refers to an ascetic lifestyle maintained at a distance from worldly and material pleasures in favour of actions leading toward a moral or spiritual code of conduct. Inspired by classical Greece, and unlike a Christian understanding of

in Bachelors of a different sort
Author: John Potvin

This book carefully considers the myriad and complex relationships between queer male masculinity and interior design, material culture and aesthetics in Britain between 1885 and 1957 - that is bachelors of a different sort - through rich, well-chosen case studies. It pays close attention to particular homes and domestic interiors of Lord Ronald Gower, Alfred Taylor, Oscar Wilde, Charles Shannon and Charles Ricketts, Edward Perry Warren and John Marshall, Sir Cedric Morris and Arthur Lett-Haines, Noel Coward and Cecil Beaton. The book underscores the discursive history and conceptual parameters of the bachelor as these collided with queer sexualities through social and cultural perceptions. It focuses on the seven deadly sins of the modern bachelor: queerness, idolatry, decadence, askesis, decoration, glamour, and finally, artifice. The seven deadly sins of the modern bachelor comprise a contested site freighted with contradiction, vacillating between and revealing the fraught and distinctly queer twining of shame and resistance. Together the furniture and collections that filled Gower's Windsor home compel us to search out the narratives that bric-a-brac at once enliven and expose well beyond the shadows of the endless and meaningless accumulation that late Victorians were said to been have afflicted by.

Joel M. Dodson

profession of faith, that is, as a form of life. In his lectures at the Collège de France, Michel Foucault described this form of life as a precursor to the technology of the modern confession. As he surveys it in ancient Stoic and Christian thought, the ‘care of the self ’ constitutes a kind of pre-​history to the hermeneutics of the subject, a continuum in the Western construction of the self as a source for reflection or work (askesis).49 Marcus Aurelius and Epictetus here offer exemplary versions of the self for Foucault, in ways not dissimilar to the Christian  207

in Forms of faith
Abstract only
E.A. Jones

religion of the Empire in 380). Now that the martyr’s crown was no longer readily available, devout Christians could aspire instead to seek so-called ‘white’ martyrdom (white as opposed to red, because it was achieved without the shedding of blood), by denying and overcoming the body and its desires and appetites. For this programme of disciplining and defining the self early Christian writers borrowed the Greek term askesis

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
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Cary Howie

askesis, this exercise of discipline, involves a necessary incompletion, a refusal to hold still, to capture itself or its beloved once and for all. And what is God if not a particularly rich and risk-laden name for the beloved? The embodied soul refuses to predetermine its own future. It’s all it can do to hold on. In fact, Isaac has already emphasized the importance of perseverance in prayer, and he has done this in a way that confirms both the erotics and the interestingly convoluted movement of Germanus’s request. The stubborn soul, the soul who just keeps at it

in Transfiguring medievalism
King Lear and the King’s Men
Richard Wilson

Shakespeare learned from the ‘curious tale’ [ 1,4,28 ] of Cinderella , and wove into his own negative dialectic of investiture and divestment, sight and blindness, which is the irony that the askesis of sackcloth and ashes is always a form of exhibitionism and deliberate aesthetic choice. For other critics have noted an affinity between Cordelia’s Trappism, Lear’s disrobing, Edgar’s dishevelment and

in Free Will
The seven deadly sins of the modern bachelor
John Potvin

the modern interior itself. The seven deadly sins of the bachelor are: queerness (sexual and socio-spatial aberration); idolatry (the unhealthy worship of a female diva, which today has intensified into celebrity culture); decadence (the excessive drive of luxury and sensory stimulation); askesis (the unnatural training of the self); decoration (feminine propensity toward the ornamental and non-functional); glamour (the over-stimulated attraction toward one’s self, body or environment); and finally, artifice (superficial indulgence in the realm of unnatural

in Bachelors of a different sort
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Shakespeare’s voyage to Greece
Richard Wilson

alive to the askesis by which abdication, abjection, and apology define the subtractive power of weakness. 108 So, when at the very end the master tells us that his ‘charms are all o’erthrown’, and ‘what strength’ he has is his own, ‘Which is most faint’ [ Epi.1–3 ], we recognise in that professed weakness not only the striptease scenario of modern art, but a final Shakespearean assertion of

in Free Will
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Richard Wilson

stage of fools’, through which askesis rehearses the negative aesthetic of later modernist artworks, as the anorectic expression of a passive aggression towards reality. As in other versions of the self-harming folktale recycled in absolutist states, the depersonalizing body politics of Shakespeare’s ‘Cinderella’ tragedy encode the aesthetic repulsion from a court society in which ‘tattered clothes

in Free Will