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Historiographical and research political reflections
Lene Koch

Being a historian of eugenics in Denmark, I have never been in want of an audience. 1 Writing in the 1990s, it seemed that the mere mention of the concept of eugenics was enough to create a strong interest in what I had to say about this – at the time – forgotten chapter of Danish history. German Rassenhygiene and its relationship to the Holocaust were well known, but it was a

in Communicating the history of medicine
Adaptation and reception of Andrea Newman’s A Bouquet of Barbed Wire (1969)
Frances Pheasant-Kelly

both attracted and scandalised audiences and reviewers alike – for instance, Penny Perrick of the Sun commented ‘Let’s hope that plastic people with horrible habits like the Mansons are banished from the screen forever’, 3 whereas Times reviewer, Michael Church, assigned the series ‘a curious magic’. 4 Also telling of the drama’s 1970s’ contexts was Times reviewer, Michael Ratcliffe’s comment that, ‘bright

in Incest in contemporary literature
David J. Appleby

Preaching, audience and authority Chapter 2 Preaching, audience and authority T he ‘matter of the ministry’, as Thomas Horton described it, exercised the minds both of preachers and the Restoration establishment.1 In 1661, Cavalier politicians framing the Treason Act had publicly laid the blame for the late rebellion ‘in very great measure’ upon seditious preaching.2 Perversely, instead of neutering the pulpits, the Act of Uniformity served to emphasise the continuing centrality of preaching in public debate. Most of the individuals the Cavalier

in Black Bartholomew’s Day
Alison Smith

she has to say includes a determination not to add padding in order to make up required length. As she said to interviewers at the Glasgow Film Festival in 1996: ‘If you feel you’re expressing something which is not worth more than ten minutes, why use more?’ Some of her films have met considerable public acclaim and gained an international audience, perhaps most strikingly Sans toit ni loi/Vagabonde ; some remain difficult to see even in France

in Agnès Varda
Tim Markham

3681 The Politics of war reporting.qxd:Layout 1 28/9/11 11:14 Page 115 6 How do audiences live journalism? I’ll say this about Tibetans, at least they’re not polar bears. (Comment posted on guardian.co.uk’s Comment is Free discussion forum) Much has been written in the past 20 years about the representation of ‘distant others’ in the news media. It was seen in the previous chapter that for Silverstone the issue of a ‘proper distance’ between audiences and mediated others is crucial because it involves the representation of humans to other humans. I have

in The politics of war reporting
Ludmilla Jordanova

Audiences, we can readily agree, are difficult both to conceptualize and to study. There can be hardly any areas of humanities and social science research where they are not an issue. Or, to put it another way, thinking about audiences can be stimulating and can bring a fresh perspective to forms of scholarship that tend to be dominated by a concern with production, whether of knowledge, artefacts, ideas or imagery

in Communicating the history of medicine
Representations, address and assumptions about influence
Elisabet Björklund

For sex educators, audiences are a central concern. This is obvious as the very purpose of sex education is to communicate knowledge about sexuality to people who, for various reasons, are considered in need of this knowledge. Through history, sex educators have striven to expand their audiences and increase the influence of their messages in different ways, not least by using mass media such as film, radio and television

in Communicating the history of medicine
Michael R. Lynn

3 The audience, economics, and geography of popular science Popular science gripped the imagination of people all over Europe in the eighteenth century and individuals peppered their conversations with facts, allusions, references, and analogies to current scientific discoveries and debates. When John Adams arrived in France to assume his new post as United States ambassador he immediately met scientifically literate people. Adams, who was a bit less versed in the ways of sociability than some of his predecessors, especially Benjamin Franklin, found himself in a

in Popular science and public opinion in eighteenth-century France
Tom Woodin

128 Working-class writing and publishing in the late twentieth century 7 Alternative publishing and audience participation Writers and publishers in the Fed responded to known communities. Previously working-class writers had been absorbed into traditional patterns of consumption and readership that reinforced hierarchies. Fed groups were aware that accounts of working-class life had not been read in significant numbers. For example, the growth of labour studies had not necessarily led to a more historically conscious labour movement.1 Mainstream cultural

in Working-class writing and publishing in the late twentieth century
Robert James

3 Trade attitudes towards audience taste The film trade: Kinematograph Weekly W hat were the attitudes of those working in the cinema trade towards working-class taste? To answer this question I shall turn to the cinema trade’s most important journal in the period, Kinematograph Weekly (hereafter Kineweekly).1 The value of this journal as a primary source cannot be overemphasised, for it provides unique access into the workings of the film industry. We gain intimate details of the role of those involved in the production, distribution, and exhibition of films

in Popular culture and working-class taste in Britain, 1930–39