Richard Rushton

2  Realism, reality and authenticity  3  Searching for reality: Chronique d’un été (Jean Rouch, Edgar Morin, 1961) I n terms of the distinction outlined in the previous chapter of this book, one might ordinarily think that André Bazin’s position in the history of film theory is set. He is a realist and that means, quite simply, that his understanding of cinema is predicated on a distinction between illusion and reality. Some films –  especially those with excessive editing, or with fanciful stage settings – will deliver illusion, while others – particularly

in The reality of film
Sophie Belot

In French cinema, representations of girls have often been associated with films made by women, as demonstrated by Carrie Tarr with Brigitte Rollet (2001). They claim that the young girl is the major cinematographic topic for a woman’s first film, and names, such as Céline Sciamma in the late 2000s, Diane Kurys and Catherine Breillat in the 1970s, substantiate this position. However, Breillat’s A Real Young Girl was different, as it attracted critics’ acerbic reception and was subsequently banned for its open depiction of a young girl’s sexual experiences. It is argued that Breillat’s images of the young girl’s sexual initiation in the 1970s brings to the fore the significance of the idea of authenticity in relation to sex and cinema. Examining the representation of the ‘real young girl’ highlights the ideas of reflexivity and creativity attached to the existentialist notion of authenticity. This article aims to show that the young girl stands as a metaphor for Breillat’s auteurist approach to challenging existing filmic conventions.

Film Studies
A paradox
Sarah Salih

Authenticity, agreed to be an impossible goal, still haunts discussion of films about the past. As Richard Burt argues, the critical consensus has decisively rejected the ‘fidelity model’. 1 In the wake of the linguistic turn it has become apparent that historical films are not academic histories, and that academic histories are not themselves the past, but representations

in Medieval film
A discursive history of French popular music
David Looseley

2 Authenticity and appropriation: a discursive history of French popular music David Looseley T Introduction his chapter is about the meanings of popular music in France.1 Music fans generally believe they know what they mean by ‘popular’ and ‘pop’; but not all of us can readily say what that is. Here, I shall use ‘popular’ to refer to what are, today, industrially produced forms of music directed at and appreciated by a very large, or ‘mass’, audience. Such forms do not usually require any conventional musical competence or erudition; and they are easily

in Imagining the popular in contemporary French culture
Tim Markham

3681 The Politics of war reporting.qxd:Layout 1 28/9/11 11:14 Page 74 4 Practical mastery of authority, authenticity and disposition As the preceding chapters have made clear, the purpose of this book is not to tell the personal stories of individual war reporters, but to describe the structured, structuring logics which determine how the field of war reporting is experienced. In fact the two are related, since individuation, along with professional identities and values, is among the common matrices by which individuals make sense of their professional

in The politics of war reporting
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Abstract only
David Hume, Horace Walpole and the Emergence of Gothic Fiction
Jonathan Dent

This article explores the complex, oft en antagonistic relationship between Horace Walpole‘s The Castle of Otranto (1764) and David Hume‘s The History of England (1754–62). Focusing on textuality and the interrelationship between literature and history, answers to a number of questions are sought. For example, why is Otranto so concerned with historical authenticity, what techniques does Walpole use to write the past and how do these compare with Humes methods? Walpole had read several volumes of Hume‘s history before writing his Gothic novel and this article proposes that Otranto can be read as a bold response to The History of England.

Gothic Studies

This book analyses the use of the past and the production of heritage through architectural design in the developmental context of Iran. It is the first of its kind to utilize a multidisciplinary approach in probing the complex relationship between architecture, development, and heritage. It uses established theoretical concepts including notions of globalism, nostalgia, tradition, and authenticity to show that development is a major cause of historical transformations in places such as Iran and its effects must be seen in relation to global political and historical exchanges as well as local specificities. Iran is a pertinent example as it has endured radical cultural and political shifts in the past five decades. Scholars of heritage and architecture will find the cross-disciplinary aspects of the book useful. The premise of the book is that transposed into other contexts, development, as a globalizing project originating in the West, instigates renewed forms of historical consciousness and imaginations of the past. This is particularly evident in architecture where, through design processes, the past produces forms of architectural heritage. But such historic consciousness cannot be reduced to political ideology, while politics is always in the background. The book shows this through chapters focusing on theoretical context, international exchanges made in architectural congresses in the 1970s, housing as the vehicle for everyday heritage, and symbolic public architecture intended to reflect monumental time. The book is written in accessible language to benefit academic researchers and graduate students in the fields of heritage, architecture, and Iranian and Middle Eastern studies.

Abstract only
Excess, Pleasure and Cloning
Monica Germanà

This essay examines the proliferation of visual representations of Robert Louis Stevenson‘s Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886), considering the question of what links contemporary (Scottish?) Gothic to its problematic origins. After a survey of cinematic and graphic adaptations, the essay focuses on Steven Moffatt‘s Jekyll (BBC, 2007), which combines the post-Darwinian anxieties surrounding Stevensons tale of human regression with a much more contemporary interrogation of the ‘human’ against the backdrop of complex globalised scientific conspiracies. Significantly, the production draws on the Scottish origin of the text, re-proposing the question of (national) identity and authenticity against the threat of globalisation.

Gothic Studies
Madness, Mimicry and Scottish Gothic
Scott Brewster

This essay draws on Julia Kristeva‘s concept of ‘borderline’ experience, a feature of psychotic discourse, to examine the representation of madness, split personality and sociopathic behaviour in James Hogg‘s The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner and the contemporary, muted Gothic of John Burnside‘s The Locust Room (2001). The main characteristics of borderline experience - a concern with authenticity and the proper name, with uncertain boundaries between inside and outside, truth and delusion - are central concerns in Hogg and Burnside, and the essay assesses the value of borderline discourse for a critical reading of madness in Gothic.

Gothic Studies