Author: Andy Kesson

This book discusses the extent of John Lyly's importance for early modern authorship in three parts: prose fiction, drama and reception. The first two parts study Lyly's impact on early modern culture, focusing on prose fiction and drama respectively. In each part, the first chapter assesses Lyly's originality and the second chapter assesses the impact of that authorship upon the print market for each of those literary forms. These two parts demonstrate how Lyly's work was innovative and was received and commodified by his contemporaries. The third part of the book examines Lyly's reception history up to the present day, focusing on nineteenth-century uses of the word euphuism as part of a debate over appropriate literary male style. The dynamic relationship between performance and text creates the market for two basic kinds of English literature: printed single-story fiction and printed drama. Lyly's dramaturgical stories are as elusive and protean as his prose fiction. At the same time that his character Euphues was being reworked and commodified by print writers and publishers, Lyly reworked and innovated ways to create fictional worlds and characters in the theatre.

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James Doelman

7 Authorship In his introduction to Kipling’s poetry, T. S. Eliot wrote that epigrams, like hymns, are ‘extremely objective types of verse: they can and should be charged with intense feeling, but it must be a feeling that can be completely shared’.1 Once again, they are ‘what all might say’, as Puttenham expressed it. Given such a perception, to whom does an epigram, satiric or otherwise, belong? As explored in Chapter 1, authorial detachment, if not anonymity, lies at the roots of the epigram tradition. Ancient epitaphs and monumentary distichs mark first of

in The epigram in England, 1590–1640
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Anish Kapoor as British/Asian/artist
Alpesh Kantilal Patel

Authorship: Anish Kapoor as British/Asian/artist I’m Indian. My sensibility is Indian. And I welcome that, rejoice in that, but the great battle nowadays is to occupy an aesthetic territory that isn’t linked to nationality. (Anish Kapoor)1 Being an artist is more than being an Indian artist. I feel supportive to that kind of endeavour … it needs to happen once; I hope it is never necessary again. (Anish Kapoor)2 Both the statements above are by India-born, England-based artist Anish Kapoor. The first was made during the opening ceremony of his first solo

in Productive failure
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Winterbottom and a body of work
Brian McFarlane and Deane Williams

articles written about Winterbottom, one detects an ongoing struggle to link Winterbottom with a particular style or approach to filmmaking; even the notion of an oeuvre is seen to be at odds with his eclectic use of genre and different modes of realism. In this chapter we will seek some methods to deal with the notion of authorship in relation to Michael Winterbottom, to understand his work better in relation to traditional

in Michael Winterbottom
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Sam Rohdie

Authorship Je fais … de Hawks, le plus grand cinéaste, Griffith excepté, naquit en Amérique, bien supérieur à mon goût à Ford, généralement plus estimé. Ce dernier m’ennuie (qu’y puis-je?) tandis que l’autre me ravit … … j’aime le cinéma, parce que je crois qu’il est le fruit non du hasard mais de l’art et du génie de hommes, parce que je pense qu’on ne peut aimer profondément aucun film si l’on n’aime ­profondément ceux de Howard Hawks. (I regard Hawks as the greatest filmmaker born in America with the exception of Griffith, far superior in my judgement to

in Film modernism
Jonathan Bignell

in literature, or later, beyond television in either radio or literature since radio inherited cultural cachet as television overtook it as the most popular medium, brought with it the desire to establish authorship as a marker of value. For Coward (1987: 79), ‘the higher the evaluation of the medium as an art , the more likely you are to find the quest to establish an author for a work.’ So once authorship attains cultural value and significance for a broadcasting institution, legitimating a medium’s claims, it becomes one of the forces contesting the means of

in Beckett on screen
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Imaginative stories in the book market (1566–78)
Andy Kesson

. Anatomies and storytelling There is much to recommend Hunter’s emphasis on the word anatomy. Lyly introduces himself in the Anatomy of Wit as ‘a fool [that] hath intruded himself to discourse of wit’ (29). If the last word of this phrase is an obvious reference to the book’s title, the representation of his authorship as a form of discursive

in John Lyly and Early Modern Authorship
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Lyly, Euphues and the market for single-story books (1578–94)
Andy Kesson

Despite Hunter’s insistence on the 1580s-bound nature of Lyly’s ‘success’, the majority of Lyly’s plays were published in the 1590s, not the 1580s, as a direct result of the cultural import and impact of his authorship. In 1601, long after Hunter claims Lyly’s name had lost its fame, the publisher William Wood expected to find customers for Love’s Metamorphosis, which

in John Lyly and Early Modern Authorship
Creating a market for printed plays (1584–94)
Andy Kesson

, does not agree. Bevington notes, ‘This was to be the only quarto of Endymion , in a clear sign of the dramatist’s declining fortunes during the early 1590s’. In his other editions of Lyly plays, Bevington is equally convinced that the Bromes’ publications were economic failures that demonstrate the increasing irrelevance of Lylian authorship to late Elizabethan

in John Lyly and Early Modern Authorship
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Our Lyly?
Andy Kesson

Enlightenment origins and interests’ lying behind Shakespeare’s current ubiquity, and we should be equally suspicious of the Enlightenment origins of Lyly’s current cultural invisibility. James Shapiro warns us that eighteenth-century ‘anachronisms underscore how irrevocably the nature of authorship had changed since Elizabethan times (though they have changed comparatively little since then, so that we stand

in John Lyly and Early Modern Authorship