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Pascale Drouet

banished man does not leave the territory, thus flouting the proclamation) – and not delayed transgression (the banished man leaves but later comes back with a vengeance). This signifies that the risk incurred is greater, since, in this case, the trespasser has no deterrent ‘war machine’; if discovered, he will be killed. Lear’s threat to Kent is absolutely clear: ‘If on the seventh day following / Thy banished trunk be

in Shakespeare and the denial of territory
From ‘effet de retour’ to unnaturalness
Pascale Drouet

Abuses of power that take the form of banishment can be interpreted as a direct consequence of parrhesia , insofar as parrhesia has been experienced by the interlocutor as speech abuse. Abusive banishment may thus be taken as an ‘ effet de retour ’ of abusive speech. 1 Naturally, this abuse is not presented as such, as ‘wrong or improper use’, 2 but is openly justified by (mis

in Shakespeare and the denial of territory
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Dethroning And Exiling Indigenous Monarchs Under British And French Colonial Rule, 1815– 1955
Author: Robert Aldrich

The overthrow and exile of Napoleon in 1815 is a familiar episode in modern history, but it is not well known that just a few months later, British colonisers toppled and banished the last king in Ceylon. This book explores confrontations and accommodations between European colonisers and indigenous monarchs. It discusses the displacement of a few among the three dozen 'potentates' by British and French authorities from 1815 until the 1950s. The complicated relationship between the crown of a colonising country and colonial monarchies has often lain in the background of historical research, but relatively seldom appeared in the forefront except in the case of the Indian princely states. The book further examines particular cases of the deposition and exile of rulers: King Sri Vikrama Rajasinha in Ceylon in 1815, Queen Ranavalona of Madagascar in 1897, and Emperors Ham Nghi, Thanh Thai and Duy Tan in Vietnam during 1885-1916. It also provides more composite accounts of Asia and Africa: the British ouster of Indian princes, the last Burmese king and a sultan in Malaya, and then British and French removal of a host of 'chieftains' in sub-Saharan Africa. Finally, the book looks at the French colonial removal of rulers in Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia - and the restoration of a Moroccan sultan on the eve of decolonisation. By the end of the colonial period, in many countries around the globe, monarchism - kingship, had lost its old potency, though it has not disappeared.

Banishment, abuse of power and strategies of resistance
Author: Pascale Drouet

This book analyses three Shakespearean plays that mainly deal with abusive forms of banishment: King Richard II, Coriolanus and King Lear. These plays present with particular clarity the mechanism of the banishment proclamation and its consequences, that is, the dynamic of exclusion and its repercussions. Those repercussions may entail breaking the ban to come back illegally and seek revenge; devising strategies of deviation, such as disguise and change of identity; or resorting to mental subterfuges as a means of refuge. They may also lead to entropy – exhaustion, letting go or heartbreak. Each in its own way, they invite us to reflect upon the complex articulation between banishment and abuse of power, upon the strategies of resistance and displacement employed to shun or endure the painful experience of ‘deterritorialisation’; they put into play the dialectics of allegiance and disobedience, of fearlessly speaking and silencing, of endurance and exhaustion; they question both the legitimacy of power and the limits of human resistance. This study draws on French scholars in Shakespearean studies, and also on contemporary French historians, theorists, anthropologists, psychoanalysts, essayists and philosophers, who can help us read Shakespeare’s plays in our time. It thus takes into account some of the works of Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, Gaston Bachelard, Marcel Detienne and Jean-Pierre Vernant, Boris Cyrulnik and Emmanuel Housset. The hope is that their respective intellectual approaches will shed specific kinds of light on Shakespeare’s plays and initiate a fruitful dialogue with Anglo-Saxon criticism.

Rethinking reception in Victorian literary culture

Dante Beyond Influence provides the first systematic inquiry into the formation of the British critical and scholarly discourse on Dante in the late nineteenth century (1865–1921). Overcoming the primacy of literary influence and intertextuality, it instead historicises and conceptualises the hermeneutic turn in British reception history as the product of major transformations in Victorian intellectual, social and publishing history.

The volume unpacks the phenomenology of Victorian dantismo through the analysis of five case studies and the material examination of a newly discovered body of manuscript and print sources. Extending over a sixty-year long period, the book retraces the sophistication of the Victorian modes of readerly and writerly engagement with Dantean textuality. It charts its outward expression as a public criticism circulating in prominent nineteenth-century periodicals and elucidates its wider popularisation (and commodification) through Victorian mass-publishing. It ultimately brings forth the mechanism that led to the specialisation of the scholarly discourse and the academisation of Dante studies in traditional and extramural universities. Drawing on the new disciplines of book history and history of reading, the author provides unprecedented insight into the private intellectual life and public work of Christina Rossetti, Matthew Arnold, William E. Gladstone, and introduces a significant cohort of Dante critics, scholars and learned societies hitherto passed unnoticed.

As it recaptures a long-neglected moment in Dante’s reception history, this path-breaking book illuminates the wider socio-cultural and economic impact that the Victorian hermeneutic turn had in advancing women’s access to literary and scholarly professions, educational reform and discipline formation.

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Pascale Drouet

The way banishment and abuse of power are articulated participates, both upstream and downstream , in a dialectics of deterritorialisation and reterritorialisation, a dynamic whose driving force remains a form of transgression: going ‘through’ or ‘beyond’, crossing and counter-crossing frontiers, hence undergoing a crisis in identity. The banished person is forced to follow a trajectory entailing various types of

in Shakespeare and the denial of territory
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Deterritorialisation for deterritorialisation
Pascale Drouet

Banishment is supposed to be a court decision; it is a decree of expulsion, on pain of death. The banished person is geographically excluded and deterritorialised. As François Zourabichvili observes, ‘the concept of territory certainly involves space, but does not consist in the objective delimitation of some geographical place. The value of territory is existential: it marks out for everyone the

in Shakespeare and the denial of territory
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Pascale Drouet

To ‘put to the ban’, to ‘condemn by public edict or sentence to leave the country’, to ‘exile’, to ‘expatriate’: these are the objective definitions of the verb ‘banish’. 1 Taking practice and subjective experience into account, Michel Foucault specifies that to banish is also to ‘destroy the home, erase the place of birth, confiscate goods and properties’, 2 that is, radically to uproot what

in Shakespeare and the denial of territory
Pascale Drouet

part will here shift to new dialectics: of passiveness and reactivity, and of speed and slowness. In both King Richard II and Coriolanus , the dynamic of riposte is a response to a denial of territory that results from (or is experienced as resulting from) injustice and abuse of power; it takes the specific form of illegal return from banishment and, whether motivated by restitution or retribution, it raises the issues of

in Shakespeare and the denial of territory
The St Vincent and the Grenadines context
Philip Nanton

Garden was sold to private buyers in lots of varying sizes. The city centre is dominated by a covered vegetable market and the House of Assembly. From off shore the backdrop of mountains and green hills is dotted with houses, but very few green areas soften the town centre’s poorly maintained and foot-buckling cobblestones, asphalt and concrete. Instead, there are signs of attempts to banish nature from

in Frontiers of the Caribbean