Alison Forrestal

chap 3 22/3/04 12:52 pm Page 74 3 Lower clergy versus bishops The church desperately needed men like Bérulle and Olier to formulate coherent theologies to underpin its reform initiatives. Yet not everyone agreed that the church should function according to a hierarchical arrangement that gave bishops absolute authority over the clergy below them in rank. Fundamental disagreements over the complicated questions of hierarchy and jurisdiction brought many tough challenges for French bishops, for they were pitted against members of the lower clergy and even

in Fathers, pastors and kings
Jinty Nelson

19 Charlemagne and the bishops Jinty Nelson When Mayke de Jong set about the subject of ‘Charlemagne’s Church’ in 2005, she began with a beautiful vignette of a bishop, Leidrad of Lyon.1 He could not be called typical – there was no such thing as a typical bishop – but he was one of those on whom Charlemagne relied most in the latter years of his reign to press ahead with the Church’s emendatio. Leidrad, appointed by the king himself in 797, drafted in to his see and province from Bavaria, promoted to archiepiscopal rank in 807, is atypically well documented

in Religious Franks
From self-representation to episcopal model. The case of the eloquent bishops Ambrose of Milan and Gregory the Great
Giorgia Vocino

18 Bishops in the mirror: from self-representation to episcopal model. The case of the eloquent bishops Ambrose of Milan and Gregory the Great Giorgia Vocino Around the year 877, the priest Andrew of Bergamo was busy abbreviating and updating his version of Paul the Deacon’s Historia Langobardorum. When dealing with the rebellion of the three elder sons of Emperor Louis the Pious (814–40) in 833, Andrew recalled how Lothar I tried to make excuses for himself by shifting the blame onto Angilbert II (824–59), the Frankish archbishop of Milan. Brought into the

in Religious Franks
The historical context of the ninth-century Cologne Codex Carolinus manuscript (Codex Vindobonensis 449)
Dorine van Espelo

24 Rulers, popes and bishops: the ­ historical context of the ninth-century Cologne Codex Carolinus manuscript (Codex Vindobonensis 449) Dorine van Espelo A unique source in many respects, the Codex epistolaris Carolinus comprises ninety-nine papal letters that were sent to the Carolingian court between 739 and 790.1 These are mostly addressed to the Frankish rulers Charles Martel, Pippin III, Carloman and Charlemagne, but there are also three letters grouped together in the collection about Adoptionism sent by Pope Hadrian I to the Spanish bishops. The letters

in Religious Franks
The legend of Frederic of Utrecht
Bram van den Hoven van Genderen

22 Incest, penance and a murdered bishop: the legend of Frederic of Utrecht Bram van den Hoven van Genderen The title of this contribution refers to the early-eleventh-century Passio Friderici.1 In this saint’s life bishop Frederic of Utrecht (fl. c. 822/26–34) is murdered by a couple of minions of Empress Judith, wife of Emperor Louis the Pious, out of revenge for the bishop’s accusations of incest and adultery against her. Moreover, incest was involved in a double sense. Judith’s presumed lover, Count Bernard of Septimania, was, according to the Passio, also

in Religious Franks
Patrick Collinson

Chapter 5 . Bishop Richard Bancroft and the succession Patrick Collinson T his is not quite a non-subject, but it comes pretty close. We have no means of knowing what Richard Bancroft, Bishop of London from 1597, may have thought, hoped or feared about the succession to the throne of England. If Bancroft ever chose to put pen to paper on this delicate subject, his views are no longer on record. There was, and in the nature of things could be, no episcopal ‘line’ on the succession. There was no legitimate forum in which the bishops could have formed a

in Doubtful and dangerous
Eucharistic controversy and the English origins of Irish Catholic identity, 1550–51
James Murray

5 The ‘absenting of the bishop of Armagh’: eucharistic controversy and the English origins of Irish Catholic identity, 1550–51 James Murray In the summer of 1551, before 28 July, Archbishop George Dowdall of Armagh made a fateful decision. After eight years of service as the crown’s appointee to Ireland’s primatial see, the archbishop elected to relinquish his office and to flee the kingdom. The ‘absenting of the bishop of Armagh’ – as Lord Deputy Croft euphemistically described Dowdall’s flight – was preceded, and immediately precipitated, by a meeting between

in Irish Catholic identities
C. E. Beneš

Part eleven describes the dates , names , and orders of all the bishops who are recorded as having existed in the city of Genoa. This part has as many chapters [nineteen] as the names of the bishops who are included here. Regarding the time in which the city of Genoa first received a bishopric, we expressed our opinion

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
Simon Barton and Richard Fletcher

Introduction to the Chronicon Regum Legionensium of Bishop Pelayo of Oviedo The Chronicon Regum Legionensium , or Chronicle of the Kings of León, attributed to Bishop Pelayo of Oviedo (1101–30 and 1142–3), is a brief history of the Leonese monarchy from the accession of Vermudo II in 982 to the death of Alfonso VI in 1109. 1 The Chronicon forms part

in The world of El Cid
Open Access (free)
Imitation of Spenserian satire
Rachel E. Hile

6 After the Bishops’ Ban: imitation of Spenserian satire Spenser’s death in 1599, the promulgation of the Bishops’ Ban in 1599, and the death of Queen Elizabeth in 1603—each of these could be expected to affect the writing of poetry in England, with Spenser’s influence becoming modified by nostalgia, authors trying to interpret the text of the Bishops’ Ban to determine how to respond to its directive “That noe Satyres or Epigramms be printed hereafter” (qtd. in McCabe, “Elizabethan satire,” 188), and everyone watching to see what degree of oversight of the

in Spenserian satire