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Author: Philip Gillett

This book examines how the working-class people are portrayed in the British cinema. One objective of this work is to take a modest step in redressing the balance by considering the popularity of the films discussed. A second objective is to demonstrate how film might be used by disciplines whose practitioners often display scant interest in its possibilities. The third objective is to consider what films can contribute to the debate on the consequences of war. A final objective is to test received opinion. The book discusses a five-dimensional model for examining images of the working class in films. These are: place in the authority structure; cohesion/fragmentation within the working-class community; internalised values; the built environment; and personal signifiers of class, notably speech, hairstyles and clothing. It deals with the war films that were made in the context working class community, and discusses The Way to the Stars, The Hasty Heart, and Wooden Horse. With the approach of war in the late 1930s, changes in censorship allowed industrial disputes to be portrayed on British screens for the first time. The working class community was portrayed in It Always Rains on Sunday to better effect as compared to Passport to Pímlíco. Three groups of criminals make regular appearances in postwar British films: spivs, who are black market traders; those have served in the forces; and career criminals. The book also deals with several British films in the postwar years focusing on dance hall, namely, Floodtide, Waterloo Road, and Dance Hall.

Across the early decades of the seventeenth century, Englishmen and women moved through a physical, social, and mental world organised into a carefully maintained balance of motion and pause. This book examines how seventeenth-century English architectural theorists and designers rethought the domestic built environment in terms of mobility, as motion became a dominant mode of articulating the world across discourses. These discourses encompassed philosophy, political theory, poetry, and geography. From mid-century, the house and estate that had evoked staccato rhythms became triggers for mental and physical motion-evoking travel beyond England's shores, displaying vistas, and showcasing changeable wall surfaces. The book sets in its cultural context a strand of historical analysis stretching back to the nineteenth century Heinrich Wolfflin. It brings together the art, architectural, and cultural historical strands of analysis by examining why seventeenth-century viewers expected to be put in motion and what the effects were of that motion. Vistas, potentially mobile wall surface, and changeable garden provided precisely the essential distraction that rearticulated social divisions and assured the ideal harmony. Alternately feared and praised early in the century for its unsettling unpredictability, motion became the most certain way of comprehending social interactions, language, time, and the buildings that filtered human experience. At the heart of this book is the malleable sensory viewer, tacitly assumed in early modern architectural theory and history whose inescapable responsiveness to surrounding stimuli guaranteed a dependable world from the seventeenth century.

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Contemporary art and post-Troubles Northern Ireland
Author: Declan Long

A vital issue in discussing distinctive group shows has been to explore how 'Northern Irish art' has emerged in dialogue with international art during the post-Troubles period. This book concentrates on the social and political developments pertinent to a study of post-Troubles art. It makes an effort to weave together fundamental background details on the peace process and the Good Friday Agreement with questions regarding the political and theoretical framing of this process of negotiation. Diverse local outcomes of the Agreement are nonetheless acknowledged: from ongoing political problems caused by the ambiguities and inconsistencies of the accord, to material manifestations of 'peace' in the built environment. The book presents thoughts on how 'Northern Irish art' of the post-Troubles era might be critically approached and appraised in light of broader contemporary conditions. It takes the 2005 exhibition of art from Northern Ireland at the Venice Biennale as the departure point for an extended examination of how the representation of 'local' concerns is shaped in relation to wider cultural and economic forces. Much of the book concentrates more directly on the manifold forms of 'ghost-hunting' undertaken by artists during the post-Troubles period. Several significant works by Willie Doherty are singled out for close-reading: photographic series and film narratives that are powerfully undecidable and uncanny in their oblique, unnerving evocations of the landscapes of Belfast and Derry. The book also discusses the haunted spaces of Doherty's practice by reflecting on artists' approaches to time and history.

Munich and the making of metropolis, 1895–1930
Author: Leif Jerram

This book focuses on the ways in which German urban élites tried to mould German cities between the 'birth' of modern planning in the 1890s and the complete cessation of building caused by the economic collapse around 1930. It investigates the attributes which 'metropolis', was given by early twentieth-century Germans. The book takes Munich as its 'still point in the turning world' of German urban development in particular, but makes arguments relevant well beyond the southern capital's city limits. It presents a case study of the urban landscape of modernity and modernisation which was increasingly. The book commences with exploration of the balanced construction of 'the city' in planners' world views. It addresses contemporaries' 'action plans' as responses to the problems of modernity, and characterises these actions as themselves distinctly modern. The book also tries to restore an emphasis on contemporaries' nuanced views of modernity and modernisation, and explores the balanced construction of 'the city' in planners' world views. Discussing hospitals, old people's homes and social housing, the book discusses that space could be a highly coercive tool for the social reformer, and scholars need to address material effects. It also demonstrates how intellectual impasses in manipulating the technologies of space could have profound political consequences. The ways that the built environment is currently used as evidence in historical writing are problematic. The book treats modernity with little eye for Modernism.

A Military Tactic or Collateral Damage?
Abdulkarim Ekzayez and Ammar Sabouni

.usip.org/index.php/publications/2019/07/syria-timeline-uprising-against-assad?fbclid=IwAR3tvoUAmzwbTRW0mGfeBDgGD-lfvG-l_lfvRpFW_d4ZnPGZlZ_zhwPZxFg (accessed 30 January 2020 ). VDC / Violations Documentation Center / ‘ About Us ’. https://vdc-sy.net/about/ (accessed 30 January 2020 ). Vignal , L. ( 2014 ), ‘ Destruction-in-Progress: Revolution, Repression and War Planning in Syria (2011 Onwards) ’, Built Environment , 40 : 3 , 326 – 41 , doi: 10.2148/benv.40.3.326 . Voice of America ( 2018 ), ‘ WHO: Alarming Spike in Attacks against Health Workers, Facilities in Syria

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian Innovation
Gerard Finnigan and Otto Farkas

. R. , Guth , S. et al . ( 2017 ), ‘ Climate Change and Global Food Systems: Potential Impacts on Food Security and Undernutrition ’, Annual Review of Public Health , 38 , 259 – 77 ., doi: 10.1146/annurev-publhealth-031816-044356 . NAS ( 2018 ), Urbanization and Slums: Infectious Diseases in the Built Environment

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Society, economy and environment, c. 1300–1650

Tower houses are the ubiquitous building of pre-modern Ireland. A type of castle, the tower house was constructed c.1350–1650, and extant examples number in the thousands. This book examines the social role of the tower house in late medieval and early modern Ireland. It uses a multidisciplinary methodology to uncover the lived experience of a wide range of people. This enables exploration of the castle’s context, including how it was used as a social tool and in environmental exploitation for economic gain. By challenging traditional interpretations of the Middle Ages we find new evidence for the agency of previously overlooked individuals, and thus a new insight into the transition from medieval to modern. Each chapter in the book builds on the one preceding, to echo the movement of trade good from environmental exploitation to entry into global economic networks, keeping focus on the role of the tower house in facilitating each step. By progressively broadening the scope, the conclusion is reached that the tower house can be used as a medium for analysing the impact of global trends at the local level. It accomplishes this lofty goal by combining archival evidence with archaeological fieldwork and on-site survey to present a fresh perspective on one of the best-known manifestations of Irish archaeology.

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Jonathan Silver

of architecture to convey histories of places far beyond their location and, of course, the remarkable story of the survival of the Chortkov dynasty, and the sanctuary provided to new arrivals in areas such as Broughton. The violence visited upon the Jews of Chortkov, and their survival, has found a resonance in the built environment and prompts us to consider further the ways in which synagogues bear witness to violence against the Jewish population in the conurbation. The history of Manchester’s Jewry began in the 1770s with various visiting merchants, but the

in Manchester
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John M. MacKenzie

, both in the metropolis and in the colonies, even if such resurgence is characterised by significant aspects of cultural hybridity. One of the most important expressions of such alleged cultural superiority lies in the built environment. Yet, in the many conventional histories of the British 1 The British Empire through buildings 1  Lovedale Mission Hospital, Eastern Cape, South Africa Empire, buildings and the built environment have received relatively little attention. On the other hand, historians of architecture and planning have devoted much research and many

in The British Empire through buildings
A case study from central London
Ilaria Pulini

This chapter provides the genealogy of a street in the elite London neighbourhood of Kensington – in terms of its housing and residents – from the late nineteenth century to today. The study concentrates on the manner in which the original built environment has been used and transformed over more than a century, opening up the temporal scope of the investigation. The different types of period properties existing in the street are examined in detail, and their current use is compared and contrasted with past narratives, highlighting ruptures

in How the other half lives