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Serving the people in Fruit Chan’s Dumplings
Glennis Byron

Many Hong Kong horror films focused on the reworking of traditional Chinese stories and beliefs in order to revisit identity politics in the context of a post-Handover Hong Kong. Fruit Chan's Dumplings has been one of the most commercially successful of these films. By the time it was produced in 2004, the situation Ackbar Abbas described was no longer quite so clear. Administrative borders, as the opening scene of Dumplings makes clear with Mei moving her raw materials from Shenzhen to Hong Kong with such ease, were no longer a sign of division. This film challenges the familiar categories of East and West, tradition and modernity, around which Hong Kong identity politics centred, terms which the conditions of globalisation render meaningless. Simultaneously, through the trope of cannibalism, Dumplings critiques globalisation, showing Hong Kong and China merging together, equally driven by the prevailing imperative of the global economy: consumption.

in Globalgothic
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Editor: Glennis Byron

The late twentieth century saw growing number of articles and books appearing on new national gothic; however, the wider context for this had not really been addressed. This collection of essays explores an emerging globalgothic useful for all students and academics interested in the gothic, in international literature, cinema, and cyberspace, presenting examples of globalgothic in the 21st-century forms. It analyses a global dance practice first performed in Japan, Ankoku butoh, and surveys the ways in which Indigenous cultures have been appropriated for gothic screen fictions. To do this, it looks at the New Zealand television series on Maori mythologies, Mataku. The unlocated 'vagabonds' of Michel Faber's "The Fahrenheit Twins" are doubles (twins) of a gothic trajectory as well as globalgothic figures of environmental change. The book considers the degree to which the online vampire communities reveal cultural homogenisation and the imposition of Western forms. Global culture has created a signature phantasmagoric spatial experience which is uncanny. Funny Games U.S. (2008) reproduces this process on the material level of production, distribution and reception. The difference between the supposedly 'primitive' local associated with China and a progressive global city associated with Hong Kong is brought out through an analysis of cannibal culture. In contemporary Thai horror films, the figure of horror produced is neither local nor global but simultaneously both. The book also traces the development, rise and decline of American gothic, and looks at one of the central gothic figures of the twenty-first century: the zombie.

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Glennis Byron

ready-made language to describe whatever anxieties might arise in an increasingly globalised world. From Appadurai’s cannibal culture to Beck’s zombie concepts to Hardt and Negri’s golems and vampires, the discourses of globalisation repeatedly turn to gothic tropes in articulating the social, cultural and economic impacts of a new world order. This is a point more fully developed in the first chapter

in Globalgothic
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The vampire and neoliberal subjectivity
Aspasia Stephanou

, unlike humans who ‘get eaten alive by this cannibal culture’ she survives (23). She is ‘attached to … [her] job by an umbilical cord’ working at the studio ‘ten or twelve hours a day, teaching, selling courses, managing, squeezing pennies’ (24) in a ‘libidinous frenzy’ as she encourages everyone to ‘fill our time with these activities so we won’t ever need to think

in Neoliberal Gothic