Search results

The Protestant Orphan Society became a social bridge that linked together throughout the Church of Ireland the humble poor and the wealthy and the great. This book examines the work of the Protestant Orphan Society in Dublin (DPOS) against the background of over a century of political, religious and social upheaval from Catholic emancipation, the Great Famine, social reforms to Independence. It first identifies the founders and supporters of the DPOS and their motivation for doing so. It asks why the Church of Ireland invested in the children of the church at this time. The book then analyses the Society's development, the grounds for support of private versus public poor relief for Protestant widows and children and stresses the crucial role that women played in the Societies' work. It examines the child welfare system implemented by the DPOS, and the extent to which its policies were forward thinking and child and family centred. The opposing views of the extensive social service carried out by PO Societies and the meaning of the charity for the Church of Ireland laity, particularly women, are explored. The book further examines applicant profiles, widows' reduced circumstances and health, attitudes to children's health, and bereavement and the attendant emotional effects. Using individual case histories the chapter examines applicant case histories which include Sean O'Casey's sister.

Abstract only

’s development, the grounds for support of private versus public poor relief for Protestant widows and children and stresses the crucial role that women played in the Societies’ work. Chapter 3 examines the child welfare system implemented by the DPOS, and the extent to which its policies were forward thinking and child and family centred. Chapter 4 highlights the opposing views of the extensive social service carried out by PO Societies and the meaning of the charity for the Church of Ireland laity, particularly women. Chapter 5 examines applicant profiles, widows’ reduced

in The Protestant Orphan Society and its social significance in Ireland, 1828–1940
Abstract only

the hands of the Brothers, and where he himself becomes an abuser of younger boys. Narrated in the raw language of Abdul’s increasingly disoriented consciousness, the novel challenges readers’ abilities to sympathize with an orphan character who, though initially represented as a victim of poverty and the US child welfare system, becomes a victimizer as well. Unlike Push, The Kid counters conventions of the bildungsroman, producing a narrative of reverse development, as Abdul’s sense of personhood is ravaged. These attacks are represented by repeated sexual assaults

in Making home
Abstract only
Family histories in the Caribbean

Ravinda Barn, ‘Caribbean families and the child welfare system in Britain’, in Harry Goulbourne and Mary Chamberlain (eds), Caribbean Families in Britain and the Atlantic World (London, 2001). 11 Sunday Express, 13 August 1995, p. 1. 12 http://riotspanel.independent.gov.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Riots-Panel-FinalReport1.pdf, accessed 1 September 2012. 13 Dionne Brand, ‘Photograph’, in Sans Souci and Other Stories (Toronto, 1989), p. 75. 14 Paget Henry, Caliban’s Reason. Introducing Afro-Caribbean Philosophy (London, 2000). 202 family histories in the caribbean

in Emancipation and the remaking of the British imperial world
Abstract only
Reformatory and industrial schools and twentieth-century Ireland

, but rather that diverse institutions of the state differed profoundly over the child welfare system (O’Sullivan, 2009). The Department of Health consistently advocated for family support services, and if a child needed alternative care, it argued that this should in the form of foster care rather than residential care. From the ­appointment of the first Inspector of Boarded out Children in 1902, this remained the ­ ­ Department’s consistent position. Only from 1970 onwards did this policy objective gradually translate into practice. The fact that all the ­Inspectors

in Defining events
Open Access (free)

back to the work of Karl Pearson, Francis Galton and Cyril Burt. However, historical contingencies impacted on the way in which children were organised and administrated within the school system, the juvenile justice system and the maternity and child welfare system in the early twentieth century that affected the model of psychology that was developed before the 1959 Mental Health Act was passed. The

in The metamorphosis of autism
Abstract only
State-supported agency

stigma that such surveillance attached to mothers and children of non-marital relationships’ (2002:16). Feminist opposition and changing norms surrounding cohabitation and births outside marriage, and the decline of marriage itself, led to the abolition of the child welfare system in 1973. This was just forty years after the introduction of blood testing for paternity recognition in 1933. At the same time there was a growth of commitment across the Nordic countries to encourage joint parental custody after divorce or separation and between lone mothers and non

in Between two worlds of father politics

rights movements and civil rights lawyers who by 1965 had ‘largely dismantled’ the harsh surveillance of people on welfare, which included midnight raids and home searches with ‘the explicit goal of limiting access’ to welfare and keeping costs down (Britto, 2000:68). In this sense there was a historical divergence from the Swedish regime, which dismantled its child welfare system in 1973 following feminist and social work opposition to the labelling and stigma attached to children and families from decades of oppressive surveillance of non-resident fathers (Bergman

in Between two worlds of father politics
Abstract only

anxieties of those in power and the political concerns of various authorities. 52 He offers the example of the ‘complex apparatus targeted upon the child’ that includes the child welfare system, schools, the education and surveillance of parents and the juvenile justice system. He has argued that the evolution of new professional groups to administer, regulate and manage such areas of everyday life thus created and propagated new forms of expertise. 53 That people accepted such expert intervention resulted from a dynamic driven by both economic expedience and the

in Feeling the strain

sanitising the country’s moral landscape. Utilising a governmentality framework they argue that a regulatory grid emerged between 1922 and 1937 which specifically targeted sexual conduct. Another aspect of the development of the system in Ireland that has been discussed is the ‘subsidiary’ attitude of government. Gilligan (2009 and 1989a) has highlighted the Irish government’s subsidiary attitude to policy development and its inadequate response to the needs of the ‘public child’. Looking at the history of the juvenile justice and child welfare systems one can see that

in Wild Arabs and savages