Frutolf of Michelsberg and his continuators

This book is the first English translation of one of the most significant chronicles of the middle ages. Written in Bamberg at the end of the eleventh century, Frutolf of Michelsberg's Chronicle offers a lively and vivid account of the great struggle between the German emperors and the papacy known today as the Investiture Contest. Frutolf's Chronicle has numerous continuations written in the first quarter of the twelfth century. Together with that, Frutolf's Chronicle offers an engaging and accessible snapshot of how medieval people reacted to a conflict that led to civil war in Germany and Italy, and fundamentally altered the relationship of church and state in Western society.

T. J. H. McCarthy

The Devil. 16 Bishop Bruno of Augsburg, 1006–29. For contemporary accounts of Bruno’s quarrels with his brother see Thietmar, Chronicle 5.32, 5.38, 6.2–3, pp. 257, 263, 277–8; trans. Warner (2001) , pp. 226, 230, 238–9. 17 Sulpicius Severus, Vita

in Chronicles of the Investiture Contest
T. J. H. McCarthy

HERE BEGINS THE PROLOGUE TO THE FOLLOWING CHRONICLE How happy that state, attests Cicero, which is ruled by the wise or whose rulers strive for wisdom, without which, it is plain, courage degenerates into mere foolhardiness. 1 We, therefore, ought more zealously to render thanks to God than other peoples, since the storms that hitherto shook us have

in Chronicles of the Investiture Contest
T. J. H. McCarthy

various chroniclers from the beginning of the world and supplied with our own pen the deeds of our times, hoping – albeit not without danger to our own reputation – that the wish of your command be satisfied. Consequently, to remedy boredom this work is divided into five books. The first finishes with the founding of the city of Rome, the second with the birth of Christ, the third with the emperorship of

in Chronicles of the Investiture Contest
T. J. H. McCarthy

bishop] of Chur from Burgundy, 350 as well as even noble laymen from the side of the king. Among other things they received the command that should it be possible, that they should secure the presence of the lord pope from across the Alps. 1 Frutolf, Chronicle 1096, above, pp. 130

in Chronicles of the Investiture Contest
The reign of Richard II

This book covers one of the most controversial and shocking episodes in medieval English history, the 'tyranny' and deposition of Richard II and the usurpation of the throne by his cousin, Henry Bolingbroke, who became King Henry IV. Richard's deposition was arguably the most portentous event in the political history of late medieval England. The book represents all the principal contemporary chronicles from the violently partisan Thomas Walsingham, chronicler of St Alban's Abbey, who saw Richard as a tyrant and murderer, to the indignant Dieulacres chronicler, who claimed that the 'innocent king' was tricked into surrender by his perjured barons. Of the three most substantial contemporary chronicles which cover the earlier part of Richard's reign, two cease before 1397: namely the Westminster Chronicle, which ends in 1394, and the Chronicon Henrici Knighton, which peters out in 1395. Fortunately, the third, the Chronica Maiora of Thomas Walsingham, continues through the revolution of 1399 and well beyond, right up to 1420. The Lancastrian, French and Cistercian chronicles are the principal narrative accounts of the years 1397-1400, though they are not the only ones. The book focuses on the course of the Bolingbroke-Mowbray dispute, or his description of the early events of the 'Epiphany Rising'.

T. J. H. McCarthy

.8. 7 Also recorded in other sources: Anselm of Gembloux, Chronicle 1117, p. 376 (a continuation of the chronicle of Sigebert of Gembloux); Actuarium Laudunense 1118, p. 445 (which gives the date as 9 January 1118). 8 St Lambert (d. c . 701). 9

in Chronicles of the Investiture Contest
Abstract only
John H. Arnold and Peter Biller

Part II: Chronicles Introduction to Part II A large proportion of evidence for heresy in the eleventh and twelfth centuries comes from chronicles, 1 but by the thirteenth century they do not loom quite so large in comparison to other genres (most obviously inquisitorial evidence). Nonetheless, and particularly for the earlier part of the thirteenth century, they provide evidence of events which are otherwise not visible to us. This is particularly the case with the prosecution of heresy in northern France, which has

in Heresy and inquisition in France, 1200-1300
Editor: C. E. Beneš

This book provides the first English translation of the Chronicle of the city of Genoa by the thirteenth-century Dominican Jacopo da Varagine (also known as Jacobus de Voragine). While Jacopo is better known for his monumental compilation of saints’ lives, the Golden legend, his lesser known Chronicle of Genoa exemplifies the important medieval genre of the civic chronicle. The work mixes scholarly research about the city’s origins with narrative accounts based on Genoese archival sources, more didactic and moral reflections on the proper conduct of public and private life, and personal accounts of Jacopo’s own experience as archbishop of Genoa from 1292 until his death in 1298. Divided into twelve parts, the work covers the history of Genoa from its ancient origins up to Jacopo’s own day. Jacopo’s first-hand accounts of events in which he himself participated—such as the great civic reconciliation of 1295, over which he himself presided—provide a valuable contrast to the more scholarly and didactic sections of the work. Together they form an integrated, coherent approach to urban history, which illustrates some of the most important styles of historiography in the Middle Ages.

I. S. Robinson

, son of Count Otto-William of Burgundy, whose daughter Agnes was the queen’s mother. 174 Louis, count of Montbéliard. Cf. Bernold, Chronicle 1092, below p. 309. 175 John, cardinal bishop of Sabina; Pope Silvester

in Eleventh-century Germany