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Kieran Keohane and Carmen Kuhling

3 Foundations of Europe’s collective household There is no document of civilization which is not at the same time a document of barbarism’. (Benjamin, 1992: 248) Of the many dream-houses of the world’s civilizations the Pantheon in Rome is possibly the most beautiful: a perfectly proportioned hemisphere within a cylinder, an apotheosis of architecture expressing the harmonization of religious and civic ideals. Hadrian had this beautiful house erected, though he had it accredited to an earlier consul, Agrippa, because Hadrian’s accession to power after the

in The domestic, moral and political economies of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland
What rough beast?
Series: Irish Society

This book explores the issue of a collective representation of Ireland after the sudden death of the 'Celtic Tiger' and introduces the aesthetic idea that runs throughout. The focus is on the idea articulated by W. B. Yeats in his famous poem 'The Second Coming'. The book also explores the symbolic order and imaginative structure, the meanings and values associated with house and home, the haunted houses of Ireland's 'ghost estates' and the fiscal and moral foundations of the collective household. It examines the sophisticated financial instruments derived from mortgage-backed securities that were a lynchpin of global financialization and the epicentre of the crash, the question of the fiscal and moral foundations of the collective household of Europe. A story about fundamental values and principles of fairness and justice is discussed, in particular, the contemporary conflict that reiterates the ancient Irish mythic story of the Tain. The book suggests correspondences between Plato's Republic and the Irish republic in the deformations and devolution of democracy into tyranny. It traces a red thread from the predicament of the ancient Athenians to contemporary Ireland in terms of the need to govern pleonexia, appetites without limits. The political and economic policies and practices of Irish development, the designation of Ireland's 'tax free zones', are also discussed. Finally, the ideal type of person who has been emerging under the auspices of the neoliberal revolution is imagined.

Celia Hughes

political life. She thought, ‘what, am I supposed to give up my bourgeois solutions and have collective households?’ Mica felt torn between Sheli’s ideas and her own instincts about how to reconcile middle-class mothering with the new socialism. She felt Sheli’s comments acutely because of how strongly she admired her as a professional woman and radical. Within the narrative of each Tufnell Park and Belsize Lane interviewee was the trope of the divided female and activist self. The mystifying conflicts young activist women had felt whilst trying to negotiate contradictory

in Young lives on the Left
Kieran Keohane and Carmen Kuhling

departed, with their household gods broken and thrown down, represents cultural trauma and tragedy; the destruction of the collective household of Irish society. Religious icons, furniture and décor, family memorabilia and household bric a brac, elements from real and imagined scenes, appear as images from dreams – the dreams which these houses’ former residents had assembled around themselves, as well as the dream images and memories of home that we ourselves project into these scenes. They are ‘phantasmagorias of the interior’, shifting scenes of real and imagined

in The domestic, moral and political economies of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland
Abstract only
Celia Hughes

stories of ‘non-aligned’ activism as it developed over the course of the 1970s and 1980s; men’s and women’s political experiences and relations in local community campaigns; Women’s Liberation childcare projects, tenants’ disputes, trade union and council struggles and private relations inside collective households. Efforts to understand the impact of Women’s Liberation as a new female political authority call for historians to read male and female experiences of public activism and private life against each other. Chapter 5 revealed the crisis in masculine left

in Young lives on the Left
Open Access (free)
Simon Smith, Jackie Watson, and Amy Kenny

context portrayed. Notably, the woodcut illustration appears to place clear emphasis on a particular set of sensory experiences that articulate the domestic intimacy of a family gathered around a psalm book or books. Through the senses of touch and sight, domestic psalm singing is represented in the image as private familial interaction, and these sensory exchanges are perhaps even more significant to the participants than musical performance itself. The family members communicate with one another in this collective household activity through physical contact, and

in The senses in early modern England, 1558–1660
Kieran Keohane and Carmen Kuhling

sustainable living is round.5 Vesta’s temple in Rome was round, like the huts of the aboriginal inhabitants of the Tiber valley and surrounding hills. The geometric principle of Vesta’s temple’s circular structure, that every point on the circumference is equidistant from the centre, represents the formal abstract principle of equality: all members contained within the circle, gathered around the fire of the collective household, the family, the tribe, the community, the city, are recognized by others as being due their fair share of common resources for their contributing

in The domestic, moral and political economies of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland
Kieran Keohane and Carmen Kuhling

Pluto, comes at a high price to be extracted in due course by the Dark Lord. ‘No taxes’ means that there is no mundus: no collective commonwealth, no store to appease the demons of the underworld – hunger, scarcity, sickness and ignorance. The commonwealth of the collective household, Central Revenue, though it benefits in the beginning, in the long run is systematically impoverished: schools, hospitals, housing, pensions are chronically underdeveloped and under-resourced. The Tax Free Zone was an Irish invention. The world’s first. But the idea quickly grew legs

in The domestic, moral and political economies of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland
Celia Hughes

committed to pre-figurative politics; she and her husband eagerly joined the collective household at Bramshill Gardens with Ellen Hammerschlagg, Sue Crockford and Tony Wickert. At a time when the early Women’s Liberation groups were struggling to find ways of drawing in more members, Alicia’s apprehension reveals some of the misperceptions and internal fears precluding involvement.89 Unknowingly, she shared much in common with Tufnell Park members: she was committed to improving women’s role in society; in Bramshill Gardens she was waging her own struggle against the

in Young lives on the Left