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Author: Bryan Fanning

In the last decade Irish society has visibly changed with the emergence of new immigrant communities of black and ethnic minorities. This book draws upon a number of academic disciplines, focusing on the relationship between ideological forms of racism and its consequences upon black and ethnic minorities. Media and political debates on racism in Ireland during this period have tended to depict it as a new phenomenon and even as one imported by asylum seekers. Ireland was never immune from the racist ideologies that governed relationships between the west and the rest despite a history of colonial anti-Irish racism. Citizenship reproduced inequalities between nationals on the basis of gender and race and ethnicity. The book explores how the processes of nation-building which shaped contemporary Irish society and the Irish state were accompanied by a politics of national identity within which claims of social membership of various minority groups were discounted. It examines the exclusionary and assimilationist consequences of Irish nationbuilding for Protestant, Jewish and Traveller minority communities. The book also considers anti-Semitism in Irish society from independence in 1922 until the 1950s. It examines how contemporary responses to refugees and asylum seekers have been shaped by a legacy of exclusionary state practices. Finally, the book talks about anti-Traveller racism, the politics of Traveller exclusion, the work of SPIARSI, and the efforts to contest racism and discrimination faced by minorities in Ireland as expressions of multiculturalism.

Abstract only
Bryan Fanning

Social Change in the Republic of Ireland, locates racism in Irish society within a historical context. It is argued in Chapter 2 that Ireland was never immune from the racist ideologies that governed relationships between the west and the rest, despite a history of colonial anti-Irish racism. The title of the book also alludes to social change resulting from recent immigration. To some extent the politicisation of asylum issues in Ireland has mirrored responses throughout ‘Fortress Europe’ and in other western countries. Newspaper headlines during 1997 depicted Ireland

in Racism and social change in the Republic of Ireland
The representations of non-Irish immigrants in recent Irish crime fiction
David Clark

crime writing, writing about crime within a distinctively Irish context, moved away from the incidents pages of the national press and, via the increased popularity of ‘true crime’ narratives, reached the pages of domestic crime novels in a relatively short space of time. Woody Haut wrote that ‘to examine a culture one need only examine its crimes’ (Haut, 1999: 3). These novels, while demonstrating that Ireland was ‘never immune from the racist ideologies that governed relationships between the west and the rest, despite a history of colonial anti-Irish racism

in Literary visions of multicultural Ireland