Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 534 items for :

  • "colonial contexts" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Nicholas Canny

4 • 1641 in a colonial context nicholas canny When, for the purposes of this chapter, I was commissioned to consider the Irish Insurrection of 1641 in a colonial context it brought to mind D. B. Quinn’s excellent but now seldom-cited 1966 book, The Elizabethans and the Irish, and particularly its ninth chapter ‘Ireland and America intertwined’.1 This chapter was devoted principally to two issues. The first focused on how negative depictions of Native Americans constructed by Elizabethan adventurers were sometimes evocative of, or even influenced by, what

in Ireland, 1641
John Derricke versus Edmund Spenser
Brian C. Lockey

can also be found in Derricke’s tract. Indeed, it is worth noting that one encounters this overlap in the writings of theologians like Francisco de Vitoria, even when it is clear that Vitoria’s primary purpose is to offer commentary on the colonial context of the New World. In Vitoria’s conclusions on his writings on unnatural sins such as cannibalism and human sacrifice, for example, he makes clear that both Christian princes and non-Christian princes hold the power to reform their own subjects and ‘make them

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Results of the Charité Human Remains Project
Holger Stoecker
and
Andreas Winkelmann

From 2010 to 2013 the Charité Human Remains Project researched the provenance of the remains of fifty-seven men and women from the then colony of German South West Africa. They were collected during German colonial rule, especially but not only during the colonial war 1904–8. The remains were identified in anthropological collections of academic institutions in Berlin. The article describes the history of these collections, the aims, methods and interdisciplinary format of provenance research as well as its results and finally the restitutions of the remains to Namibia in 2011 and 2014.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
An interview with Vernelda Grant
Bridget Conley
and
Vernelda Grant

This edited transcript of conversations between an Apache cultural heritage professional, Vernelda Grant, and researcher Bridget Conley explores the knowledge that should guide the repatriation of human remains in the colonial context of repatriating Apache sacred, cultural and patrimonial items – including human remains – from museum collections in the United States. Grant provides a historical overview of the how Apache elders first grappled with this problem, following the passage of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (1990) in the US Congress. She explains how and why community leaders made decisions about what items they would prioritise for repatriation. Central to her discussion is an Apache knowledge ecology grounded in recognition that the meaning of discrete items cannot be divorced from the larger religious and cultural context from which they come.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
From Karokynká/Tierra del Fuego to Austria
Fernanda Olivares
,
Constanze Schattke
,
Hema’ny Molina
,
Margit Berner
, and
Sabine Eggers

Museums are places characterised by collecting objects, displaying them for public education and also subjecting their collections to research. Yet knowledge can not only be created by using the collection for research. The history of a collection can also be reconstructed, albeit mostly in a fragmentary way. This is important when there is evidence that the collection was acquired in a colonial context, when the collection contains human remains and more so if these were taken from Indigenous peoples. Reconstructing the history of a collection can assist source communities in strengthening their identities and help to regain lost knowledge about their ancestors. This study analyses the provenance of fourteen crania and calvaria of the Selk’nam people from Tierra del Fuego, stored at the Department of Anthropology, Natural History Museum Vienna. Additionally, the significance of these results and their meaning for today’s Selk’nam community Covadonga Ona will be contextualised within the framework of colonial history and museum systems.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Marie-Luce Desgrandchamps
,
Lasse Heerten
,
Arua Oko Omaka
,
Kevin O'Sullivan
, and
Bertrand Taithe

individuals who had long experience of working in Nigeria, or from those who operated in other colonial contexts and transferred to the aid sector. Thinking about the crisis in this way is important because it allows us to understand Biafra both as something new, but also as a continuation of the language and practices used to describe humanitarian intervention in the past. The paternalism that characterised earlier interventions did not just disappear with political

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Sara Mills

was entirely absent. Exploration was men’s business: the frontier was a man’s space. (Cathcart, 1999: 7) Many of the nineteenth-century explorers talked about Nature as ‘she’ and in that sense they could be seen to be feminising the landscape, but it is unclear from their use of this metaphor whether the writers did see the land as feminine or were simply using a conventional rhetorical device. What this type of critical work on the feminised land within the colonial context often neglects is the sort of writing

in Gender and colonial space
Abstract only
Sara Mills

Imperial space … with its ideal neutral observer and its unified placeless Euclidean passivity, was a means of foundation, a metaphorical way of transforming the present exile into a future enclosure, a visible stage, an orderly cause and effect pageant. (Carter,1987: 304) I have been arguing in this book that in order to analyse the relationship between gender and spatial relations within the colonial context, we need to see space as much more than simply, in Massey’s terms, ‘social relations stretched out

in Gender and colonial space
Sara Mills

political context which determines certain types of subjectivity, I shall be drawing on discourse theory as a way of describing the discursive parameters within which British people within the imperial and colonial context defined themselves as colonial subjects. Rather than examining the psychic constitution of the British communities, which necessitates assuming that these communities were homogeneous, I will focus on the way that individuals defined themselves and were constituted in relation to their communities, their home country and indigenous communities. All of

in Gender and colonial space
History, theory, practice
Jared Holley

designed to apply trans-contextually – that is, to be capable of clarifying practices and theories of solidarity that emerge from any given geographical space at any given time in (modern) history. My aim in this response is to test the limits of Sangiovanni's account by placing it in dialogue with the history and present of anticolonial solidarity. I raise two main points. First, Sangiovanni's conceptual history of solidarity is limited by a neglect of the colonial context in which the concept of solidarity first emerged. I suggest that

in Solidarity – Nature, grounds, and value