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Between garden and city
Alain Sinou

. An enduring, hostile image of nature The desire to make their colonial towns green required of the colonialists a ‘positive’ relationship with the natural environment, though until the beginning of the twentieth century this relationship was far from being achieved in sub-Saharan Africa. The relationship people have with the natural

in Garden cities and colonial planning
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Natural history, human cultures and colonial identities

Museums were an expression of the western conviction in the onward march of the rational. Local civilisations were also the prime focus in other Asian imperial museums. This is the first book that examines the origins and development of museums in six major regions if the British Empire in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It analyses museum histories in thirteen major centres in Canada, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, India and South-East Asia, setting them into the economic and social contexts of the cities and colonies in which they were located. Museums in Canada have a longer, though somewhat chequered, history than elsewhere in the British Empire. The Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) in Toronto and the Royal British Columbia museum in Victoria were two notable, yet very different, expressions of imperial expansiveness . The book then overviews two representative museums: the South African Museum (SAM) in Cape Town and the Albany Museum in Grahamstown. The origins and development of the National Museum of Victoria (NMV) in Melbourne, South Australian Museum (SAuM) and Australian Museum (AM) are then discussed. New Zealand/Aotearoa, with its Canterbury Museum and War Memorial Museum, has discrete origins as a colony in the nineteenth century. Imperial museums in Asia were unquestionably distinctive compared with those of the territories of white settlement. A number of key themes emerge: the development of elites within colonial towns; the emergence of the full range of cultural institutions associated with this; and the modification of the key scientific ideas of the age.

The Manchester School, colonial and postcolonial transformations
Author:

Anthropology after Gluckman places the intimate circle around Max Gluckman, his Manchester School, in the vanguard of modern social anthropology. The book discloses the School’s intense, argument-rich collaborations, developing beyond an original focus in south and central Africa. Where outsiders have seen dominating leadership by Gluckman, a common stock of problems, and much about conflict, Richard Werbner highlights how insiders were drawn to explore many new frontiers in fieldwork and in-depth, reflexive ethnography, because they themselves, in class and gender, ethnicity and national origins, were remarkably inclusive. Characteristically different anthropologists, their careers met the challenges of being a public intellectual, an international celebrity, an institutional good citizen, a social and political activist, an advocate of legal justice. Their living legacies are shown, for the first time, through interlinked social biography and intellectual history to reach broadly across politics, law, ritual, semiotics, development studies, comparative urbanism, social network analysis and mathematical sociology. Innovation – in research methods and techniques, in documenting people’s changing praxis and social relations, in comparative analysis and a destabilizing strategy of re-analysis within ethnography – became the School’s hallmark. Much of this exploration confronted troubling times in Africa, colonial and postcolonial, which put the anthropologists and their anthropological knowledge at risk. The resurgence of debate about decolonization makes the accounts of fierce, End of Empire argument and recent postcolonial anthropology all the more topical. The lessons, even in activism, for social scientists, teachers as well as graduate and undergraduate students are compelling for our own troubled times.

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Gordon Pirie

In the twilight of the British Empire, flying imperially was one last expression of the reach of British overseas ambition and style. The routes flown by the designated imperial airline connected London to major imperial cities, and to lesser colonial towns and even minor bush encampments. Like the several hundred private flyers who tracked

in Cultures and caricatures of British imperial aviation
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Lindsay J. Proudfoot
and
Dianne P. Hall

Irish and Scottish settlers, shared ethnic consciousness was no guarantee of uniformly essentialist narratives of place. This was also true of the performative spaces periodically created in colonial towns by annual ethno-national commemorations and associational events, such as St Patrick’s Day and the Loyal Orange Order’s celebrations of the Twelfth of July. Despite their reputation as celebrations of

in Imperial spaces
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Building the French empire
Benjamin Steiner

Other case studies on large colonial projects have been less focused on indigenous agency. For the planning and building of Dutch colonial towns overseas, Ron van Oers mostly sees Dutch traditions and schemes to apply the ‘mother concept’ of such architecture theorists as Simon Stevin at work. 23 Interestingly, van Oers follows a narrative similar to that of high modernization that gives precedence to the value of the Dutch urban heritage. This heritage eventually contributed to the diffusion of an ‘organizational

in Building the French empire, 1600–1800
An ‘ideal’ colonial city in Atlantic Canada
Benjamin Steiner

, Québec: A French Colonial Town in America, 1660 to 1690 (Ottawa: Minister of the Environment, 1991), p. 18; Marc Vallières, Quebec City: A Brief History (Quebec: Les Presses de l’Université Laval, 2011), p. 49. 18 Johnston, Endgame , p. 130. See also B. A. Balcom, ‘Defending Unama’ki: Mi’kmaw Resistance in Cape Breton, 1745’, Nashwaak Review 22–23 (2009), 447–92; for a general account of involvement of

in Building the French empire, 1600–1800
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Garden cities and colonial planning: transnationality and urban ideas in Africa and Palestine
Liora Bigon

residential segregation Proposing a model for colonial town planning activity under the British Empire, Robert Home portrayed the relations between the colonial status of a territory and its geographic location, the type of planning activity and the usual planning mechanism. 56 For instance, in places over which direct rule was exercised, usually the rapidly growing ports, severe housing and

in Garden cities and colonial planning
Pondichéry as an imperial city in the Mughal state system
Benjamin Steiner

the rooftops. The majority of buildings then were in local hands, and of 1,959 ‘Malabar’ houses, 122 were built of stone, twice the number of the 65 European stone houses. 36 Post-war Pondichéry thus must have looked more like a Creole city than the planner's ideal of a regular colonial town. All of these accomplishments of engineering, logistics, and budgeting came at the cost of the exploitation of a low-paid indentured Indian workforce and could not hide the fact that the imperial ambition

in Building the French empire, 1600–1800
Policing the empire, 1830–1940
David M. Anderson
and
David Killingray

the empire. 29 This colonial mentalité was most visibly evident towards the end of the nineteenth century in an urban context – in the towns of Australia and Canada, as well as in those of India and Africa – where we see the emergence of forms of policing that closely resemble those then prevalent in England. Constables in colonial towns walked a beat, or patrolled in twos and threes, covering the

in Policing the empire