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Architecture, memes and minds
Author: Chris Abel

While there is widespread agreement across disciplines that the identities of individuals, groups and places are significantly interrelated, there are equally divergent views as to the nature and origins of those relationships. The first part of the book highlights that the prime importance of the human body in spatial cognition and human perception generally. In stressing the fundamental role of the body as the medium of all personal experience, the concept of the self that emerges thus far retains a strong unitary core. An alternative theory of extended minds which retains the integrity of individual human agents while embracing the extension of personal powers by external devices is also discussed. The second part looks at the scope of inquiry to take in the wider impact of technology on human evolution and the extended self. Selected writings from some of Stiegler's prominent followers and critics were also examined for what they contribute to our understanding of Stiegler's ideas and their possible further applications. He and his followers continue to fall back upon neo-Darwinian concepts and terminologies in elaborating their ideas. Theories of emergence and self-production, or autopoiesis, are investigated as promising alternatives to orthodox evolutionary theory. The subject of design, function of memes, impacts of the coevolution of humankind and technology on the human mind and the self are some other concepts discussed. The third part of the book focuses talk about cognitive roots of classification and combinativity, the relations between form and content, and vernacular architecture.

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Chris Abel

chapter follows the new thinking and discoveries of leading researchers in the field, some of whom have been motivated by the belief that a full understanding of the self and consciousness will come about only from a broadening of the cognitive and neurosciences to encompass the phenomenology of human experience. From an exploration of current concepts of the self and embodied minds, the discussion then moves on to some of the more specific and important discoveries in the latter field, many of which lend empirical support to Merleau-Ponty and Polanyi’s speculations

in The extended self
Chris Abel

his concluding chapter, Mingers also helpfully clarifies Varela’s concept of the self and embodied cognition as related aspects of what he describes as the ‘enactive paradigm’ to which autopoietic systems belong. As opposed to conventional theories of cognition, which assume that individuals are constantly striving to match their own representations of the world to an objective world that is somehow already ‘out Rethinking evolution EXSELF.indb 89 89 30/07/2014 13:39:13 5.4  Diagram of relations between an organism, its world, and the observer’s environment

in The extended self
Essays on theatre, imagery, books and selves in early modern England>
Author: Stephen Orgel

This book focuses on performance construed in the largest sense, as the deployment of a personal style, as imagery of various kinds, and even as books, which in the early modern era often include strongly performative elements. The chapters in the book fall logically into four groups: on personal style and the construction of the self, on drama, on books, and on the visual arts. Personal style is performative in the simple sense that it is expressive and in the more complex sense that it thereby implies that there is something to express. The book takes a broad view of the question of performance through disguise. Disguises in Elizabethan drama are nearly always presumed to be impenetrable, effectively concealing the self, whereas costume is designed to adorn the self, to make the self more strikingly recognizable. The book considers the changing effects of disguise and costume both on concepts of the self and on assumptions about the kind of reality represented by theater. As a practice that makes performance visible as such, theater is characterized by an ongoing reflection on the very norms that make dramatic performance legible and indeed possible. Images are never more performative in and for a culture than when they offer a view onto the differences through which culture is made.

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Chris Abel

springboard enabling one person to empathize with another, thus opening the way for the sharing of minds and cultures beyond individual perceptions – possibly even preceding the use of common languages. In stressing the fundamental role of the body as the medium of all personal experience, the concept of the self that emerges thus far retains a strong unitary core. Taking a radically different turn, Chapter 3 opens with Thomas Metzinger’s claim that there is no such thing as a self, only a collection of representations of the self that can be easily manipulated to reveal

in The extended self
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Stephen Orgel

of almost any social role, is also essential to the functioning of every human culture. The permanence and impenetrability of the self beneath the costume, and therefore the essential superficiality of the costume, however, has not always been taken for granted. The essay considers the changing effects of disguise and costume both on concepts of the self and on assumptions about the kind of reality represented by theater

in Spectacular Performances
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Chris Abel

flounder on, apparently incapable of confronting the harsh realities of a way of life that can lead only to disaster. This book takes a fresh look at the root causes of that dependency and their origins from the joint perspectives of embodied minds and extended cognition. It traces those roots to the coevolution of Homo sapiens and technology, from the first use of tools as extensions of the human body to the motorized urban culture sweeping the globe, the environmental effects of which are fast changing the planet itself.3 Refuting popular concepts of the self and free

in The extended self
Angelika Zirker

). See also Haekel: ‘No matter at which point in history we choose to determine the beginning of the modern individual self, it is inextricably linked with the history of the soul’ (179); Fietz 18; and Reiss 256. 3 Shurtleff locates the emergence of a concept of theself’ in the twelfth century and links this to the ‘renewed interest in the Delphic injunction “Know

in William Shakespeare and John Donne
Community engagement and lifelong learning
Author: Peter Mayo

In this broad sweep, Mayo explores dominant European discourses of higher education, in the contexts of different globalisations and neoliberalism, and examines its extension to a specific region. It explores alternatives in thinking and practice including those at the grassroots, also providing a situationally grounded project of university–community engagement. Signposts for further directions for higher education lifelong learning, with a social justice purpose, are provided.

Karl Polanyi (1886–1964) returned to public discourse in the 1990s, when the Soviet Union imploded and globalization erupted. Best known for The Great Transformation, Polanyi’s wide-ranging thought anticipated twenty-first-century civilizational challenges of ecological collapse, social disintegration and international conflict, and warned that the unbridled domination of market capitalism would engender nationalist protective counter-movements. In Karl Polanyi and Twenty-First-Century Capitalism, Radhika Desai and Kari Polanyi Levitt bring together prominent and new thinkers in the field to extend the boundaries of our understanding of Polanyi's life and work. Kari Polanyi Levitt's opening essay situates Polanyi in the past century shaped by Keynes and Hayek, and explores how and why his ideas may shape the twenty-first century. Her analysis of his Bennington Lectures, which pre-dated and anticipated The Great Transformation, demonstrates how Central European his thought and chief concerns were. The next several contributions clarify, for the first time in Polanyi scholarship, the meaning of money as a fictitious commodity. Other contributions resolve difficulties in understanding the building blocks of Polanyi's thought: fictitious commodities, the double movement, the United States' exceptional development, the reality of society and socialism as freedom in a complex society. The volume culminates in explorations of how Polanyi has influenced, and can be used to develop, ideas in a number of fields, whether income inequality, world-systems theory or comparative political economy. Contributors: Fred Block, Michael Brie, Radhika Desai, Michael Hudson, Hannes Lacher, Kari Polanyi Levitt, Chikako Nakayama, Jamie Peck, Abraham Rotstein, Margaret Somers, Claus Thomasberger, Oscar Ugarteche Galarza.