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Olga Vassilieva

9 Conflict management in the Caucasus via development of regional identity Olga Vassilieva Introduction    the preconditions for and possibilities of Caucasian integration as a way of conflict management in the region. The 1990s has revealed that a common Caucasian identity might be used for ‘constructing’ a regional security community. To testify to this thesis, a significant part of the chapter addresses the question of how different identities have influenced the development of nationalism and cooperation, conflict escalation and conflict

in Potentials of disorder
Kathryn Nash

Srebrenica echoed the failures of the UN in Rwanda. A UN force was on the ground, but it was prevented from halting large-scale atrocities against civilians either because of a lack of political will, a lack of resources, or both. Evolution of UN policy in the 1990s The UN, like Africa, tried to reassess its approach to conflict management and peacekeeping in the early 1990s. In early 1992, the Secretary Council asked Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali to prepare an analysis and a set of recommendations to improve preventative diplomacy, peacemaking, and

in African peace
The Other side
Author:

Conducting an analysis of some of the most candid interview materials ever gathered from former Irish Republican Army (IRA) members and loyalists in Northern Ireland, this book demonstrates through a psychoanalysis of slips of the tongue, jokes, rationalisations and contradictions that it is the unconscious dynamics of the conflict — that is, the pleasure to be found in suffering, failure, domination, submission and ignorance, and in rivalry over jouissance — that lead to the reproduction of polarisation between the Catholic and Protestant communities. As a result, it contends that traditional approaches to conflict resolution which overlook the unconscious are doomed and argues that a Lacanian psychoanalytic understanding of socio-ideological fantasy has great potential for informing the way we understand and study all inter-religious and ethnic conflicts and, as such, deserves to be further developed in conflict-management processes. Whether readers find themselves agreeing with the arguments in the book or not, they are sure to find it a change from both traditional approaches to conflict resolution and the existing mainly conservative analyses of the Northern Ireland conflict.

This is a start-of-the-art consideration of the European Union’s crisis response mechanisms. It brings together scholars from a range of disciplinary backgrounds to examine how and why the EU responds to crises on its borders and further afield. The work is based on extensive fieldwork in among another places, Afghanistan, Libya, Mali and Iraq.

The book considers the construction of crises and how some issues are deemed crises and others not. A major finding from this comparative study is that EU crisis response interventions have been placing increasing emphasis on security and stabilisation and less emphasis on human rights and democratisation. This changes – quite fundamentally – the EU’s stance as an international actor and leads to questions about the nature of the EU and how it perceives itself and is perceived by others.

The volume is able to bring together scholars from EU Studies and Peace and Conflict Studies. The result showcases concept and theory-building alongside case study research.

Kathryn Nash

The OAU’s priorities were illustrated not only by the Charter but also by the institutions that were established and more importantly adequately funded and supported. Similarly, the OAU’s response to conflicts was a further reflection of the norms chosen by the OAU and the priorities of the organization. The non-interference conflict management policy became firmly established, and the focus of the OAU’s work to address conflict on the continent was appealing to the parties of the conflict to find a peaceful solution and to keep major powers out of African

in African peace
A framework for understanding EU crisis response
Oliver P. Richmond
,
Sandra Pogodda
, and
Roger Mac Ginty

and Conflict, the work was particularly interested in the extent to which a commonly accepted framework for understanding responses to conflict could be applied to how the EU responds to crises. The conflict response framework stretches from conflict management to conflict resolution and to conflict transformation, with conflict management the most conservative and conflict transformation the most

in The EU and crisis response
Abstract only
Kathryn Nash

to our understanding of norm creation within the specific spaces of regional organizations. As such, it has implications both for the role that regional organizations play in shaping norms in their own spheres and also the role they play in shaping and promoting international norms. Specifically, I ask why the OAU chose norms in 1963 that underpinned a non-interference conflict management policy and why the AU chose very different norms in the early 2000s that led to a non-indifference conflict management policy. I argue that African regional organizations

in African peace
Sandra Buchanan

here, loosely pertaining to a peace and conflict impact assessment. Accordingly, this chapter examines the place of conflict transformation within the conflict management discourse and conflict cycle and explores a number of existing definitions, all serving to highlight its distinctiveness. The wider but related areas of citizen empowerment, development aid and economic development are

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development
Abstract only
Sandra Buchanan

transformation in action and presenting post-ceasefire Northern Ireland and the Border Counties as a case ripe for lesson sharing. Conflict transformation and socioeconomic development Conflict transformation is a relatively unexplored and largely misunderstood concept within the broadly defined field of conflict management. It is also generally misunderstood

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development
Abstract only
Sophie A. Whiting

7 Spoiling the peace? Northern Ireland is often presented as a model of conflict management in terms of its DDR (Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration) processes and its political progress, a rare example of a functioning consociation.1 Yet dissent over the terms and conditions of a peace agreement is a common feature within any peace settlement. As Darby explains: Disaffection within paramilitary organisations is perhaps the most obvious threat to peace processes. Such organisations are rarely monoliths presented by their opponents; rather they are

in Spoiling the peace?