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The affective politics of the early Frankfurt School
Author: Simon Mussell

This book offers a unique and timely reading of the early Frankfurt School in response to the recent 'affective turn' within the arts and humanities. It revisits some of the founding tenets of critical theory in the context of the establishment of the Institute for Social Research in the early twentieth century. The book focuses on the work of Walter Benjamin, whose varied engagements with the subject of melancholia prove to be far more mobile and complex than traditional accounts. It also looks at how an affective politics underpins critical theory's engagement with the world of objects, exploring the affective politics of hope. Situating the affective turn and the new materialisms within a wider context of the 'post-critical', it explains how critical theory, in its originary form, is primarily associated with the work of the Frankfurt School. The book presents an analysis of Theodor Adorno's form of social critique and 'conscious unhappiness', that is, a wilful rejection of any privatized or individualized notion of happiness in favour of a militant and political discontent. A note on the timely reconstruction of early critical theory's own engagements with the object world via aesthetics and mimesis follows. The post-Cold War triumphalism of many on the right, accompanied by claims of the 'end of history', created a sense of fearlessness, righteousness, and unfettered optimism. The book notes how political realism has become the dominant paradigm, banishing utopian impulses and diminishing political hopes to the most myopic of visions.

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Melancholic dispositions and conscious unhappiness
Simon Mussell

2 Feeling blue: melancholic dispositions and conscious unhappiness Nothing that has ever happened should be regarded as lost for history.1 Ahead of the 2015 International Day of Happiness, the United Nations announced its plans to create ‘the world’s happiest playlist’. Employing the musical compilation skills of a few pop musicians and Peace and Goodwill Ambassadors, the UN hoped to utilize ‘the universal language of music to show solidarity with the millions of people around the world suffering from poverty, human rights abuses, humanitarian crises and the

in Critical theory and feeling
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Once more, with feeling
Simon Mussell

stifling, passive, and anti-​social. Developing this theme further, the chapter closes with a section on what I  term ‘conscious unhappiness’. Drawing on the critical theory of Theodor Adorno, this section affirms the importance and connectedness of affective Introduction 9 and political refusal. Rather than seeking to avoid or relieve dysphoric feelings by way of psychic adjustment, conscious unhappiness amplifies the unmet needs, giving voice to the suffering that arises from a social world in need of wholesale transformation. As part of its revolutionary critique

in Critical theory and feeling