Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 18 items for :

  • "contemporary British films" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Comedy-drama in 1990s British cinema
Author: Nigel Mather

This book explores the interactions of comedy and drama within a group of significant and influential films released during the decade of the 1990s. It examines a group of British films from this period which engage with economic and social issues in unusual and compelling ways. Brassed Off and The Full Monty are two films invoking very different cultural traditions as possible activities for unemployed males and troubled communities in modern British society. The book then discusses a number of contemporary British films focusing upon the experiences of British-Asian and African-Caribbean characters and their efforts to feel 'at home' in Western and British society. It features an extensive analysis of East is East, a comedy-drama about the cultural and ideological tensions surfacing between members of a British-Asian family living in Salford, circa 1971. Next, the book includes case studies of Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill, and Love Actually. It investigates the ways in which humour is deployed for dramatic and emotional effect in the context of scenarios dealing with such seemingly non-comic subjects as mass unemployment, failed or uneasy relationships, bitter family disputes, or instances of racial tension and conflict in British society. The book demonstrates that the interaction of comic and dramatic modes of narration within the films discussed proved to be a dynamic creative mechanism in 1990s British cinema, facilitating and enabling the construction of innovative and genuinely exploratory narratives about characters who are striving to realise particular aspirations and hopes within a complex culture.

Abstract only
‘Tears of laughter': comedy-drama in 1990s British cinema
Nigel Mather

. The chapter concludes with case studies of Brassed Off (Mark Herman, 1996) and The Full Monty (Peter Cattaneo, 1997), two films invoking very different cultural traditions as possible activities for unemployed males and troubled communities in modern British society. Chapter 2 discusses a number of contemporary British films focusing upon the experiences of British-Asian and African

in Tears of laughter
Open Access (free)
Sequence and the rise of auteurism in 1950s Britain
Erik Hedling

date. In a 1947 article called ‘Angles of Approach’ Anderson delivered a fierce attack on contemporary British film culture, outlining a model for a devoted politics of creation, well in line with what we would later understand as auteurism and art cinema aesthetics. 11 On the role of film criticism, Anderson wrote: ‘It is the critic’s first duty (and in this sense we are all critics) to perceive the object of a film

in British cinema of the 1950s
A celebration

This book offers a startling re-evaluation of what has until now been seen as the most critically lacklustre period of the British film history. It includes fresh assessment of maverick directors; Pat Jackson, Robert Hamer and Joseph Losey, and even of a maverick critic Raymond Durgnat. The book features personal insights from those inidividually implicated in 1950s cinema; Corin Redgrave on Michael Redgrave, Isabel Quigly on film reviewing, and Bryony Dixon of the BFI on archiving and preservation. A classic image from 1950s British cinema would be Jack Hawkins in The Cruel Sea, the epitome of quiet English integrity. Raymond Durgnat's A Mirror for England: British Movies from Austerity to Affluence, which deals extensively with British films of the 1950s, was written in the mid-1960s and was published in 1970. In a 1947 article called 'Angles of Approach' Lindsay Anderson delivered a fierce attack on contemporary British film culture, outlining a model for a devoted politics of creation, well in line with what we would later understand as auteurism and art cinema aesthetics . The war films of the 1950s together constitute the assented-to record of the emotions and moral judgments called upon to set in order those disorderly events. The book also talks about the Festival of Britain, White Corridors, and four Hamer's post-Ealing films: The Spider and the Fly, The Long Memory, Father Brown and The Scapegoat. A number of factors have contributed to the relative neglect of the 1950s as a decade in British cinema history.

Abstract only
Peter Marks

and film comedy, registers his contribution, as does Take Ten: Contemporary British Film Directors (1991). There, Peter Greenaway speaks of admiring Gilliam and fellow Python Terry Jones for their anarchy and irreverence, 4 while Derek Jarman puts ‘glorious Terry Gilliam’s Brazil ’ on a very short list of British 1970s and 1980s films he would keep. 5 By

in Terry Gilliam
Abstract only
Nigel Mather

ethnic comedy-dramas with their work on Bhaji on the Beach (1994), and therefore it was fitting that the new century saw them produce belated follow-up films: Bend It Like Beckham (directed by Chadha) and Anita and Me (scripted by Syal). The near ten-year gap between their first and second British films tended to suggest, however, that the place of the ethnic comedy-drama within contemporary British film culture was by no

in Tears of laughter
Alfred Hitchcock and Anthony Asquith
Tom Ryall

of high culture including prominent figures such as H. G. Wells and George Bernard Shaw from the literary world; Roger Fry and Augustus John from the fine arts; alongside John Maynard Keynes, Julian Huxley, and J. B. S. Haldane from the intellectual and scientific community. 14 The major animating principle of the Society was a keen interest in films coming from France, Germany and the Soviet Union which were radically different especially in terms of film style and technique from contemporary British films, and, perhaps a more important

in British art cinema
Jonathan Rayner

conventions of the naval war film, The Enemy Below (Dick Powell, 1957) might appear as an obvious nominee. Its reduction of naval combat to a personalised struggle between a U-boat commander (Curt Jurgens) and the captain of an American destroyer escort (Robert Mitchum) produces an even-handed, unsentimental but still idealised representation of the war at sea. Like contemporary British films and international coproductions such as The Battle of the River Plate (Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1956) and Under Ten Flags (Duilio Coletti, 1960), its contrasts in

in The naval war film
Abstract only
Not to be crossed
Andrew Roberts

studios in the UK (Murphy 1992 : 265) resulted in further international fame in a series of Miss Marple films in which, as with many of the Carry On series, the settings are a bizarre anagram of the ancient and the contemporary. British films of the previous decade had seen the rise of the middle-class senior police detective of Jack Hawkins and John Mills and the decline of the traditional gentleman detective; in Rank’s adaptation of Margery Allingham’s Tiger in the Smoke (Roy Baker 1956), Albert Campion is dispensed with altogether. In 1961, Murder She Said

in Idols of the Odeons
Early life and short films
Rowland Wymer

. ‘What I found in film was community. I discovered my world in film.’ 50 It was paradise regained. Notes 1 Take Ten: Contemporary British Film Directors , eds Jonathan Hacker and David Price (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1991), p. 231. 2 Jarman, Kicking the

in Derek Jarman