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The First Aid Nursing Yeomanry in the First World War
Author: Janet Lee

Total war tends to create a situation that falls back on established social and cultural discourses and institutional arrangements at the same time that it provides the opportunity for a shifting and renegotiation of these arrangements. This book explores how the First Aid Nursing Yeomanry (FANY) drew upon, and/or subverted cultural mythologies to make sense of their wartime service. It focuses on this renegotiation of gender and examines seven key themes implicit in this process. The first theme concerns the ways women's military organizations utilized traditional notions of genteel femininity and its accompanying nurturance, cheerfulness and devotion in their promise of service, yet went beyond the parameters of such cultural mythologies. The second focuses on the gendering of military heroism. The third theme addresses the context of female military service in terms of the preparation women received, the opportunities they were given and the risks they took, and focuses on their coping behaviours. Theme four focuses specifically on women's transgression into the masculine terrain of driving and mechanics and shares the ways they developed skills and competencies previously off-limits for women. Such transgressions almost invariably led to women having to negotiate masculine authority and develop skills in autonomy, independence and assertiveness - the focus of theme five. The last two themes discussed in the book address the integration and consolidation of women's organizations as the war progressed and their service became indispensable.

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Janet Lee

military heroism. It explores women’s participation in the dangers of war and the creation of feminine stories of personal heroism that aligned women alongside male combatants, thus marking their place as participants in the war. The third theme addresses the context of female military service in terms of the preparation women received, the opportunities they were given and the risks they took, and focuses on their coping behaviours. Although such coping behaviour was grounded in traditional femininity, it allowed women opportunities to push against the boundaries of

in War girls
Alun Withey

female sickness between simply having an illness, and physically withdrawing to the bedchamber. Moreover, pressure on domestic life could also be increased when women fell ill, since men were forced into caring roles, for which they had few models or frames of reference. This, again, reminds us that we need to be more careful in inferring a unity of sickness coping behaviours that may not be justified. As this chapter will argue, there were, in reality, multiple ‘sick roles’, contingent on a number of different factors from age to sex, social status to religious belief

in Physick and the family
Coping with separation during the Napoleonic Wars (the Fremantle papers, 1800–14)
Elaine Chalus

E. Dimiceli, Mary A. Steinhardt and Shanna E. Smith, ‘Stressful Experiences, Coping Strategies and Predictors of Health-Related Outcomes among Wives of Deployed Military Servicemen’, Armed Forces & Society, 36:2 (2010), 352–73 (accessed 20 July 2016); Cherie Blank et al., ‘Coping Behaviours used by Army Wives during Deployment Separation and their Perceived Effectiveness’, Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, 24 (2012), 661 (accessed 20 July 2016).   8 Cecil Aspinall-Oglander (ed.), Admiral’s Wife: Being the Life and Letters of the Hon. Mrs

in A new naval history