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Vittorio Bufacchi

inescapably on my mind, and probably on the mind of many readers. The reason, needless to say, is COVID-19, caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus or more colloquially coronavirus; whatever its name, this highly infectious disease caused by a severe acute respiratory syndrome is the most devastating and lethal pandemic in living memory. At present, 47 million cases of the virus have been reported, causing the deaths of more than 1.2 million people worldwide. 2 By the time you read these pages these numbers will be even more frightening, and the pain and fear left in the virus

in Everything must change
Vittorio Bufacchi

deaths caused by the virus; the fact that infected hospital patients were allowed to return to care homes, even though they had tested positive for COVID-19, and the lack of access to testing and personal protective equipment in care homes, were two significant contributing factors. 8 In Ireland, the UK, and across Europe thousands of people lost their lives prematurely because care homes lacked the protective equipment and financial resources to cope with the coronavirus outbreak. Society’s relationship to people living in old age has never been under closer

in Everything must change
Open Access (free)
Fernando Espada

of coronavirus cases in real time were not long ago scanning Twitter feeds in dread of the moment when US President Donald Trump would make good on his promise to unleash ‘fire and fury like the world has never seen’. Fortunately for life on earth, two summits, a ‘very beautiful letter’ to Trump from Kim Jong Un and a brief encounter between the two leaders in the Korean Demilitarised Zone appear to have delayed the moment of truth. However, as Nazanin Zadeh-Cummings and Lauren Harris explain in ‘The Impact of Sanctions against North Korea on Humanitarian Aid’, the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanity and Solidarity
Tanja R. Müller and Róisín Read

Coronavirus Vaccines ’, Foreign Policy , 29 December , https://foreignpolicy.com/2020/12/29/its-time-to-use-eminent-domain-on-the-coronavirus-vaccines/ (accessed 1 June 2021 ). Chouliaraki , L. ( 2011 ), ‘ “Improper Distance”: Towards a Critical Account of Solidarity as Irony

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Lessons Learned from an Intervention by Médecins Sans Frontières
Maria Ximena Di Lollo, Elena Estrada Cocina, Francisco De Bartolome Gisbert, Raquel González Juarez, and Ana Garcia Mingo

Introduction The disease caused by a hitherto unknown coronavirus, and denoted coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was designated a pandemic on 11 March 2020 ( World Health Organization, 2020a ). The first case of COVID-19 was detected in Spain on 31 January 2020, and as of August 2021 there have been more than 4,500,000 cases and over 80,000 COVID-19 deaths in the country. Given the novelty of the virus, there was a lack of basic information about the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
A Belated but Welcome Theory of Change on Mental Health and Development
Laura Davidson

disability and vice versa. 7 Neglect of underlying social and economic determinants reduces all healthcare service impact. The interconnection has become painfully apparent during the current COVID-19 pandemic, with the novel coronavirus compounding and complicating the disease burden among the poor. For example, UK research revealed that people with hypertension, diabetes and obesity are at higher risk of poor virus outcomes ( The Health Foundation, 2020 ; Public Health England, 2020

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
The Politics of Infectious Disease
Duncan McLean and Michaël Neuman

). United Nations ( 2020 ), COVID-19 and Human Rights: We Are All in This Together , April , www.un.org/en/un-coronavirus-communications-team/we-are-all-together-human-rights-and-covid-19-response-and (accessed 10 November 2021 ). Watts , S. ( 1999 ), Epidemics and History: Disease

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Gender Equality and Culture in Humanitarian Action1
Ricardo Fal-Dutra Santos

). Ritholtz , S. ( 2020 ), ' LGBTQ+ People Left Out by Exclusionary COVID-19 Aid Practices ', The New Humanitarian , 24 June , www.thenewhumanitarian.org/news-feature/2020/06/24/LGBTQ-gender-coronavirus-discrimination-aid (accessed 30 August 2020 ). Roth , S. ( 2015 ), The

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Debates Surrounding Ebola Vaccine Trials in Eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo
Myfanwy James, Joseph Grace Kasereka, and Shelley Lees

. BBC ( 2020 ), ‘ Coronavirus: French Racism Row over Doctors’ Africa Testing Comments ’, 3 April , www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-52151722 (accessed 22 November 2021 ). Branswell , H. ( 2019 ), ‘ Debate over Whether

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Philosophical lessons from lockdown

French philosopher Michel de Montaigne (1533–92) famously said that facing our mortality is the only way to properly learn the ‘art of living’. He was right. This book is about what we can learn from COVID-19 about the art of living, as individuals but also collectively as a society: this crisis could potentially change our lives for the better, ushering in a more just society. The book will explore a number of key themes through philosophical lenses. Chapter 2 asks whether coronavirus is a misfortune, or an injustice. Chapter 3 focuses on the largest cohort of victims of coronavirus: people in old age. Chapter 4 asks whether life under coronavirus is comparable to life in the so-called ‘state of nature’. Chapter 5 explores the likely impact of coronavirus on the global phenomenon of populism. Chapter 6 investigates the relationship between post-truth and coronavirus. Chapter 7 focuses on the role of experts during this crisis. Chapter 8 looks at the spike of incidents of domestic violence during the lockdown via an analysis of Sally Rooney’s Normal People. Chapter 9 explores four key lessons that must be learned from the COVID-19 crisis: that politics matters; that central states are necessary; that taxation is important; and that radical reforms, including the introduction of a universal basic income, are crucial. Chapter 10 considers what philosophy can contribute to the debate on COVID-19, and why we have a moral duty not to become ill.