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James Coleman

10 The Scottish Covenanters James Coleman A bloody sword! A bloody sword! Forged and furbish’d by the Lord! For thee, O Scotland! ’tis unsheathed – From thy martyr’d saints bequeathed!1 T his verse, taken from ‘Renwick’s Visit to the Death-­Bed of Peden’, by the public lecturer and poet James Dodds (1817–74), is one of a multitude of nineteenth-­century texts articulating the debt Scotland owed to the seventeenth-­ century Covenanters. With a peculiarly Victorian combination of fiery rhetoric and tearful sentimentality, the poem depicts the moment when the

in Making and remaking saints in nineteenth-century Britain
Patrick Thornberry

Global instruments on HR 7 The Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights General The Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) does not contain a specific article on indigenous groups or – unlike the ICCPR1 – on minorities.2 None the less, concern about the conditions of indigenous life has exercised the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (the ESC Committee) on many occasions and will doubtless continue to do so. The Covenant is structured as a programmatic or promotional human rights treaty.3 The basic obligation for the

in Indigenous peoples and human rights
Patrick Thornberry

Global instruments on HR 5 The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights I The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR)1 was adopted by the UN General Assembly and entered into force on 23 March 1976.2 The Covenant has been ratified by 148 States,3 including many with significant indigenous populations. On the other hand, the non-parties also include many States with indigenous populations, including Bangladesh, Indonesia,4 Malaysia, Myanmar, Pakistan and Papua New Guinea. The Covenant is a complex statement of rights incorporating

in Indigenous peoples and human rights
Scriptural patterns and model piety in the early modern sickchamber
Robert W. Daniel

cordial; a most precious medicine to keep Gods people from perishing in time of affliction.’  7 What is striking, however, is the way specific scriptures were repeatedly used to enact specific activities in the sickchamber: from demonstrations of patience to covenanting, will-making, restorative prayers and thanksgiving praises after recovery. This essay, thus, demonstrates the ways in which similar devotional identities were distilled as much as disseminated in accounts of illness. Patience during

in People and piety
Daniel Anlezark

stone pillar and almost overwhelms the pagan cannibals of Mermedonia. Despite their differences, all the poems share an interest in two themes, which emerge from the biblical story of the Flood and its theological interpretation: covenant and apocalypse. Genesis A Scholars of Old English poetry generally agree that Genesis A is an early poem, perhaps written as early as the

in Water and fire
Article 27 and other global standards on minority rights
Patrick Thornberry

ICCPR II: Art. 27 and minority rights standards 6 The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights II: Article 27 and other global standards on minority rights The most regular examinations of indigenous issues by the HRC in the reporting procedure and under the Optional Protocol have taken place in connection with Article 27: In those States in which ethnic, religious or linguistic minorities exist, persons belonging to such minorities shall not be denied the right, in community with the other members of their group, to enjoy their own culture, to

in Indigenous peoples and human rights
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Andrew Holmes

This article examines Presbyterian interpretations in Scotland and Ireland of the Scottish Reformations of 1560 and 1638–43. It begins with a discussion of the work of two important Presbyterian historians of the early nineteenth century, the Scotsman, Thomas McCrie, and the Irishman, James Seaton Reid. In their various publications, both laid the template for the nineteenth-century Presbyterian understanding of the Scottish Reformations by emphasizing the historical links between the Scottish and Irish churches in the early-modern period and their common theology and commitment to civil and religious liberty against the ecclesiastical and political tyranny of the Stuarts. The article also examines the commemorations of the National Covenant in 1838, the Solemn League and Covenant in 1843, and the Scottish Reformation in 1860. By doing so, it uncovers important religious and ideological linkages across the North Channel, including Presbyterian evangelicalism, missionary activity, church–state relationships, religious reform and revival, and anti-Catholicism.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Lessons Learned from an Intervention by Médecins Sans Frontières
Maria Ximena Di Lollo, Elena Estrada Cocina, Francisco De Bartolome Gisbert, Raquel González Juarez, and Ana Garcia Mingo

Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights ’, 3 January , www.ohchr.org/en/professionalinterest/pages/cescr.aspx (accessed 10 July 2020) . United Nations Human Rights, Office of the High Commissioner ( 1976b ), ‘ International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights ’, 23 March

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Abstract only
The myth of the Flood in Anglo-Saxon England
Author: Daniel Anlezark

The story of the Flood, inherited by the Anglo-Saxons during their conversion to Christianity, was transformed by them into a vital myth through which they interpreted the whole of history and their place in it. The dual character of the myth, with the opposition between threatened destruction and hope of renewal, presented commentators with a potent historical metaphor, which they exploited in their own changing historical circumstance. This book explores the use of this metaphor in the writings of the Anglo-Saxons. It is the integration of a well-known biblical story into the historical and cultural self-definition of a group of people converted to Christianity and its worldview. The Flood in the Bible is clearly a punishment, though the sin is not so well defined. This forms part of a historical pattern of sin and punishment extending back to Eden, and progressed to the sin and exile of Cain. For Bede the historian, the Flood was a key event in the earlier history of the world; for Bede the theologian, the Flood was an event replete with mystical significance. In Exodus and Andreas all the poems share an interest in two themes, which emerge from the biblical story of the Flood and its theological interpretation: covenant and apocalypse. Noah is the 'one father' not only of Israel, but of the whole human race, and his introduction widens the concept of 'inheritance' in the Exodus. The book concludes with a detailed discussion of the significance of the Flood myth in Beowulf.