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What can culture, and its manifestations in artistic and creative forms, ‘do’? Creativity and resistance draws on original collaborative research that brings together a range of stories and perspectives on the role of creativity and resistance in a hostile environment. In times of racial nationalism across the world, it seeks to connect, in a grounded way, how creative acts have agitated for social change. The book suggests that creative actions themselves, and acting together creatively, can at the same time offer vital sources of hope.

Drawing on a series of case studies, Creativity and resistance focuses on the past and emergent grassroots arts work that has responded to migration, racism and social exclusion across several contexts and locations, including England, Northern Ireland and India. The book makes a timely intervention, foregrounding the value of creativity for those who are commonly marginalised from centres of power, including from the mainstream cultural industries. Bringing together academic research with individual and group experiences, the authors also consider the possibilities and limitations of collaborative research projects.

Chris Duke, Michael Osborne, and Bruce Wilson

8 Culture and creativity In January 2012, it was announced that the UK’s Heritage Lottery Fund had given its support to a project that would ‘breathe new life into Glasgow’s vast ­Victorian Kelvin Hall’ (University of Glasgow 2012). The plans, if they come to fruition, would involve the University of Glasgow and Glasgow Life working collaboratively to develop the building as a shared museum collections facility. Not only would this permit greater public access to the many exhibits in the various museums of the city, many currently now in store, but the aim is

in A new imperative
Cultural production in a provincial city
Ben Rogaly

5 ‘And then we just let our creativity take over’: cultural production in a provincial city Introduction it’s funny because it was writing to [my old friend] that I realised the experience that changed my mindset about multiculturalism. I went to Cuba when I was twenty-two and I’d not felt relaxed with black, brown people, whatever … Because they always seemed to have a chip on their shoulder, and it became my chip on my shoulder I suppose. But I went there and I was with people who were just totally relaxed, whoever they were, whatever colour they were and when

in Stories from a migrant city
Dorothy Porter

agonist treatments in particular have led to clinical caution regarding their use. 9 This chapter investigates questions about balance in Parkinson's Disease by analysing historical shifts in debates about a predetermined behavioural model of a Parkinson's Disease personality, its relationship to artistic creativity and implications for therapeutic equilibrium in clinical management. The aim of the chapter is to demonstrate that focusing on balance merely in terms of therapeutic

in Balancing the self
Shulamith Behr

2 The dynamics of gendered artistic identity and creativity in Der Blaue Reiter Shulamith Behr I n my study ‘Künstlergruppe Brücke and the Public Sphere: Bridging the Gender Divide’, it was argued that, while the Brücke group was comprised exclusively of male practitioners, women participated in its promotion as spectators, patrons and supporters of contemporary art.1 Urbanization and modernity, the concomitant rise of the middle classes and the struggle for emancipation, albeit far short of political equality, were guarantors of women’s engagement in the

in German Expressionism
Sodomy, Abjection and Gothic Fiction in the Early Nineteenth Century
George Haggerty

The essay looks at the public vilification of the sodomites exposed in the Vere Street scandal in the early nineteenth‐century and suggests a connection between these acts of violence and the violence that occurs in Gothic fiction of the same period.

Gothic Studies
A literary history
Author: Andrew Smith

The focus in this book is on how the dead and dying were represented in Gothic texts between 1740 and 1914 - between Graveyard poetry and the mass death occasioned by the First World War. The corpse might seem to have an obvious place in the Gothic imaginary but, as we shall see, the corpse so often refuses to function as a formal Gothic prop and in order to understand why this occurs we need to explore what the corpse figuratively represented in the Gothic during the long nineteenth century. Representations of death often provide a vehicle for other contemplations than just death. A central aim of this study is to explore how images of death and dying were closely linked to models of creativity, which argues for a new way of looking at aesthetics during the period. Writers explored include Edward Young, Ann Radcliffe, Mary Shelley, James Boaden, Edgar Allan Poe, Emily Brontë, George Eliot, Henry Rider Haggard, Bram Stoker and Arthur Machen.

Sophie Belot

In French cinema, representations of girls have often been associated with films made by women, as demonstrated by Carrie Tarr with Brigitte Rollet (2001). They claim that the young girl is the major cinematographic topic for a woman’s first film, and names, such as Céline Sciamma in the late 2000s, Diane Kurys and Catherine Breillat in the 1970s, substantiate this position. However, Breillat’s A Real Young Girl was different, as it attracted critics’ acerbic reception and was subsequently banned for its open depiction of a young girl’s sexual experiences. It is argued that Breillat’s images of the young girl’s sexual initiation in the 1970s brings to the fore the significance of the idea of authenticity in relation to sex and cinema. Examining the representation of the ‘real young girl’ highlights the ideas of reflexivity and creativity attached to the existentialist notion of authenticity. This article aims to show that the young girl stands as a metaphor for Breillat’s auteurist approach to challenging existing filmic conventions.

Film Studies
‘Metzengerstein’ (1832), ‘The Visionary’ (1834), ‘Berenice’ (1835), the Imagination, and Authorship‘s Perils
Travis Montgomery

The fusion of Gothic and Eastern details, which one encounters in these stories, is obviously not original to Poe. William Beckford‘s Vathek, Charlotte Dacres Zofloya, and Byrons Eastern tales contain similar blends, but in ‘Metzengerstein’, ‘The Visionary’, and ‘Berenice’ Oriental and Gothic devices, especially the former, serve unique purposes. With these motifs, Poe continues his investigation of authorship, a theme animating his Poems (1831), in which Oriental devices also appear,with surprising frequency. Published shortly before Poe wrote ‘Metzengerstein’ this volume showcases verse dealing with the craft of writing and the nature of inspiration, and in several poems from this collection, ‘East’ and ‘West’ operate as metaphorical shorthand, with ‘East representing poetic genius and ‘West’ suggesting unimaginativeness. Middle-Eastern devices serve related purposes in #8216;Metzengerstein’, ‘The Visionary’, and ‘Berenice’, stories sharing thematic correspondences with the poems that preceded them. In particular, these tales evince Poe‘s anxieties about authorship, its demands, and its pitfalls. Throughout the narratives, Oriental machinery constitutes a network of symbols, collapsing complex ideas into compact metaphors, and with these devices, Poe imaginatively investigates the life of writing in nineteenth-century America, where professional writers struggled to satisfy a mass audience while following their own aesthetic inclinations. Such experiences no doubt proved ‘Gothic’ for these authors working in a society transformed by industrialization, a space where commercial trends impinged on creativity and threatened artistic freedom. Gothic fiction offered a proper vehicle for Poe‘s own anguished response to the challenges he and others faced while negotiating their conflicting roles as artists and professionals. For Poe, preserving the sanctity of the imagination, figuratively associated with the Middle East, was paramount, and ‘Metzengerstein’, ‘The Visionary’, and ‘Berenice’, all of which employ Gothic and Oriental devices, dramatize artistic failure, the betrayal of genius resulting in imaginative decay or death.

Gothic Studies
Open Access (free)
Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian Innovation
Gerard Finnigan and Otto Farkas

, acceptance and implementation of new ideas, processes, products or services’ ( Thompson, 1965 : 36). This clear and concise meaning was advanced to incorporate concepts of creativity ( Amabile et al. , 1996 : 25), profitability and value adding ( Damanpour, 1992 ; Johannessen et al. , 2001 ), differentiating between process or discrete event ( Cooper, 1998 ), distinguishing within business functions and practices ( Mortensen and Bloch, 2005 : 46) and even classifying

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs