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An ecological approach to rural cinema-going
Kate Bowles

This paper considers the impact of extra-filmic elements on the cultural decision-making behaviours of a small rural Australian cinema audience, focusing on the rural New South Wales village of Cobargo in the late 1920s. In considering how why such fragile rural picture show operations either failed or became successful, it is critical to take account of rural geographies, particularly in terms of early road development, and the nature and state of road bridges in flood-prone areas. The paper argues that these elements are part of a broad ecosystemic framework for cultural decision-making which can assist in our interpretation of early newspaper advertising and promotion for picture show programs.

Film Studies
Andrew Patrizio

environmental humanities by drawing selectively on existing work in the discipline. Building on canonical, largely male, approaches in Chapter 1 , the main aim of ecofeminism within this book is to show its power in theory, political philosophy and activism. I seek to align a prominent strand of political and cultural ecology – namely ecofeminism – with the huge contribution of feminism within art history and criticism. Surprisingly, there is very little if any material on this particular disciplinary boundary, even though the varied work of Lippard, Lacy, Krauss, Pollock

in The ecological eye
Open Access (free)
Precedents to sustainability in nineteenth-century literature and culture
John Parham

. Zapf, Hubert 2016. Literature as Cultural Ecology: Sustainable Texts. London: Bloomsbury Academic Open Access. www.bloomsburycollections.com/book/ literature-as-cultural-ecology-sustainable-texts/ch2-the-ecocultural-potentialof-literature. Accessed 13 February 2017. Zola, Emile 1980 [1887]. La Terre [The Earth]. Trans. Douglas Parmée. London: Penguin.

in Literature and sustainability
Abstract only
Paying attention – environmental justice and ecocritical art history
Andrew Patrizio

and bind it to more immediate material factors. At the other end of the spectrum, an art historian who confines discussion to singular artefacts, perhaps with an eye towards provenance, authenticity and even market worth, might see another kind of value in positioning these objects into wider political and cultural ecologies that they would ordinarily consider as operating on too abstract or unknowable a level. Close scrutiny of the more distant shaping forces that press upon an object can supplement a carefully developed empiricism, create a new kind of value and

in The ecological eye
Andrew Patrizio

concepts. An interest in the most specific area of ‘cultural ecology’ as an extension of art history can be found in the writing of Henri Focillon (1881–1943), particularly in his well-known ‘The Life of Forms in Art’ (1934), which directly bridges aesthetics, art history and evolutionary thinking. 13 Echoing Darwin, Focillon asserts that ‘[t]he life of forms is not the result of chance’. 14 For Eric Fernie, ‘The Life of Forms in Art’ combined the Hegelian system of Riegl and Wölfflin with the empiricism of Burckhardt to form a single concept of style. 15

in The ecological eye
Rikki Ducornet’s surrealist ecology
Kristoffer Noheden

–91. 72 Ducornet, Deep Zoo , pp. 16–18. 73 Gagliano, ‘Breaking the Silence’, p. 92. 74 Kate Rigby, ‘Earth's Poesy: Romantic Poetics, Natural Philosophy, and Biosemiotics’, in Hubert Zapf (ed.), Handbook of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology (Berlin: De

in Surrealist women’s writing
Open Access (free)
Ecopoetics, enjoyment and ecstatic hospitality
Kate Rigby

Philosophy, and Biosemiotics’. In De Gruyter Handbook of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology. Ed. Hubert Zapf. Berlin: De Gruyter, 45–64. Rigby, Kate 2015b. Dancing with Disaster: Histories, Narratives, and Ethics for Perilous Times. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press. Rose, Deborah Bird, with Sharon D’Amico et al. 2002. Country of the Heart: An Indigenous Australian Homeland. Canberra: Aboriginal Studies Press. Seddon, Mark 2010. ‘A Fresh Outbreak of Dutch Elm Disease is Threatening the Existence of the UK’s Remaining English Elm Trees’. BBC Newsnight, 21 August

in Literature and sustainability
Sustaining literature
Claire Colebrook

coterminous with life in general, and yet must also (in order to be recognised and circulated) take part in a cultural ecology: On the one hand, this thing is not a thing, not-as one ordinarily believes things to be-a natural thing: in fact ‘biodegradable,’ on the contrary, is generally said of an artificial product, most often an industrial product, whenever it lets itself be de-composed by microorganisms. On the other hand, the ‘biodegradable’ is hardly a thing since it remains a thing that does not remain, an essentially decomposable thing, destined to pass away, to lose

in Literature and sustainability
Abstract only
Ory Bartal

activator and has undermined the cultural supremacy of abstract, conceptual ideas over material objects. In doing so, it has sought to germinate new spheres of understanding – an active cultural ecology with no division between human and inanimate forces. Following these ideas, this study focuses on the role of design as a social practice and explores how, where, and why objects impact the construction of power relations and the creation of meaningful social systems.81 In this context, my methodology centres on identifying the mechanisms of action shaped by the aesthetic

in Critical design in Japan
Abstract only
Andrew Patrizio

terrain for contestation within and between differences, rather than suppress them.’ 16 It is beyond the scope of this book to draw out the full implications of Harvey’s observations on the socio-ecological categories of competition, struggle, adaptation, diversification, collaboration, cooperation, mutual aid and environmental transformations, but cultural ecology and production need this insight and it should surely dominate our attention as the discipline moves on. 17 The metaphor of the metabolic has found new life in recent scholarship, with Wark

in The ecological eye