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This book presents a biography of the poetics and politics of London in 1613, from Whitehall to Guildhall, that is, Shakespeare's London. It examines major events at court, such as the untimely death of Prince Henry and its aftermath, and the extravagant wedding of Princess Elizabeth to Frederick of Germany and her journey to the Continent. The city flourished with scores of publications on a vast array of topics, including poetry, travel narratives, music, and, of course, plays. The book offers summaries and analyses of most of these texts, knowing that some of them may not be well-known to all readers. Many of these publications had a kind of link to the court. In order to understand the context of the year 1613, the book actually begins in October 1612 with Prince Henry's illness and death in November, which had a major impact on what happened in 1613. It proceeds more or less chronologically from this event to Princess Elizabeth's wedding and the stunning array of dramatic performances at court, and includes the journey to her new home in Germany. As part of the year's cultural nexus, the narrative reaches into the Guildhall experience to explore the riches of the books that emanated from London's printers and to examine specifically the drama performed or published in 1613. The final major focus centres on the Carr-Howard wedding at the year's end, full of cultural activities and ripe with political significance.

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Harold Godwinson, the last Anglo
Lindy Brady

7 •• Conclusion: Harold Godwinson, the last Anglo-Saxon in the Welsh borderlands The Welsh borderlands were a distinctive territory where two peoples came together throughout the Anglo-Saxon period. This conclusion looks just past the Norman arrival in England to the continued depiction of this region as a cultural nexus – both of English and Welsh, and of AngloSaxon and Anglo-Norman England – in the Vita Haroldi. This understudied thirteenth-century text is, as Stephen Matthews has argued, a work of ‘secular hagiography’1 which claims that Harold was not

in Writing the Welsh borderlands in Anglo-Saxon England
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Ann Davies

Spanish cinema. It is in this sense above all that the director works as a cultural nexus, not solely in terms of a consistent vision of contemporary Spanish society but also of a consistent misperception of how he conveys that vision. In terms of Basque cinema, Calparsoro’s work highlights the difficulties of the very narrow conceptualisation of the idea posited by Jaume Martí-Olivella and Joseba Gabilondo, as outlined in the introduction. Basque cinema as a concept appears to have a strong tie to wider concepts of Basque national identity; and this in turn reveals

in Daniel Calparsoro
Lindy Brady

to inaccessible wilderness spaces, and depicted sympathetically, suffering at the hands of the Normans. Throughout the Anglo-Saxon period, the distinctive region of the Welsh borderlands functioned as a cultural nexus between Welsh and Anglo-Saxons. The shift to a perception that it was the Welsh alone who acted like outlaws highlights the loss of the borderlands’ distinct culture after the arrival of the Normans. In Chapter Seven, the Conclusion to this book, I explore a text which reflects on this distinctive borderlands culture from a perspective long after the

in Writing the Welsh borderlands in Anglo-Saxon England
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The Dunsoete Agreement and daily life in the Welsh borderlands
Lindy Brady

cultural nexus. By this, I mean a region where two peoples and two cultures came together relatively equitably for a long period of time, and out of that region’s role as a nexus between Welsh and Mercian cultures something new and distinctive emerged. Some terminological clarification is in order. In order to avoid anachronism, I am deliberately avoiding the use of words with modern political connotations, like ‘diverse’, ‘multicultural’ or ‘melting pot’, to describe the cultural qualities of this region. Neither would it be accurate to characterise the Welsh

in Writing the Welsh borderlands in Anglo-Saxon England
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David M. Bergeron

and death in November, which had a major impact on what happened in 1613. The book will proceed more or less chronologically from this event to Princess Elizabeth’s wedding and the stunning array of dramatic performances at court, and include the journey to her new home in Germany. As part of the year’s cultural nexus, the narrative reaches into the Guildhall experience to explore the riches of the books

in Shakespeare’s London 1613
Dave Morland

concentrations of power at interconnections between different networks. How different is this assessment from that of the social anarchists? Were the social anarchists too immersed in Marxian economics to perceive the power dynamics at play in social and cultural networks? Is it that poststructuralist philosophy identifies flows of power in the socio-cultural nexus because that nexus is more visibly central to our lives than it was in the nineteenth century? It is beyond the remit of this chapter to address such questions in detail, but it is imperative that consideration be

in Changing anarchism
Michael Leyshon and Catherine Brace

, nationhood and identity with the transitory, abject and deviant behaviour of young people living there. The films and novels mentioned here portray young people’s lives in a way that punctures the hermetic seal of the rural idyll. Through focusing on the social, political and cultural nexus of a single location, these stories bring a sense of a differentiated world in the countryside; young people are

in Cinematic countrysides
Lindy Brady

texts that depict his life show his roots in the cultural nexus of the Welsh borderlands, presented as a locus of elite military advancement. Guthlac spent a portion of his youth exiled among the British and as the leader of a multi-ethnic war band, and contemporary Welsh and CambroLatin texts also make clear that these were core characteristics of military life in the borderlands. The mixed culture of the Welsh borderlands is also evident in this chapter’s second significant argument: that even in this Anglo-Saxon saint’s life, the politics of land control are much

in Writing the Welsh borderlands in Anglo-Saxon England
The scholarly achievements of Sir James Ware
Mark Empey

praesulibus Lageniae, p. 57. See also BL, Add. MS 4788, fols 139v–140v. 51 BL, Add. MS 4821, fol. 242v. GRIBBEN 9781526113245 PRINT.indd 130 20/04/2017 15:33 The scholarly achievements of Sir James Ware 131 These men represent only a fraction of the people to whom Ware loaned material. Beyond the Dublin cultural nexus there existed a wide network of friends. These were by no means confined to traditional Protestant circles, as one might expect. While it is possible to identify members of the New English community within the web of Ware’s book-loaning club, he

in Dublin