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From bad taste to gross-out
John Mundy
and
Glyn White

not outright censorship, seems to some to be an appropriate response. A more typical situation, however, is comedy that some find funny and entertaining, but which seems to others crude, vulgar, derogatory, or simply not funny. In this chapter we examine some films and programmes which raise questions about taste and about cultural values. Comedy works because it engages with boundaries, with

in Laughing matters
The case of Shakespeare

Academic analyses in cultural studies of the second half of the twentieth century had made a case to extend the term 'culture' to the tastes, practices and creativity of the groups marginalised by ethnicity and class. This book deals with Shakespeare's role in contemporary culture in twenty-first-century England. It looks in detail at the way that Shakespeare's plays inform modern ideas of cultural value and the work required to make Shakespeare part of modern culture. The book shows how advocacy for Shakespeare's universal and transcendent values deal with multiple forms of 'Shakespeare' in the present and the past. His plays have the potential to provide a tangible proxy for value that may stabilise the contingency and uncertainty that attends the discussion of both value and culture in the twenty-first century. The book shows how the discussions of culture involve both narratives of cultural change and ways of managing the knowledge in order to arrive at definitions of culture as valuable. It examines the new languages of value proffered by the previous Labour government in the first decade of the twenty-first century. The book further shows how both the languages and the practice of contemporary cultural policy have been drastically affected by economic pressures and the political changes occasioned by the post-2008 fiscal crisis.

Open Access (free)
Gender Equality and Culture in Humanitarian Action 1
Ricardo Fal-Dutra Santos

achieving humanitarian goals. However, gender-transformative humanitarian action must build on and support existing cultural values, practices and movements that challenge patriarchy. Finally, I also recognise that engaging in gender-transformative action requires humanitarian actors to challenge patriarchy within the sector itself. Due to limited space, the references cited in this text may not do justice to the richness of existing literature, especially by feminist scholars

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Clara Duterme

Established during the Guatemalan Peace Process, the Oslo Accord contemplates the question of compensating the victims of internal armed conflict. Not only was this accord founded on the principles of victims rights, but it also intends to contribute to the democratic reconstruction of Guatemalan society through a process of recognition of victims status and memory – intended to have a reconciling function. The article focuses on the work of two organisations implementing the Oslo Accord and aims to analyse the discourses and practices of the local actors and their perception of the application of victims rights. Civil society actors and members of the National Compensation Programme demonstrate different approaches both in practical work and in representations of what is right. However, revendication of local cultural values is present in all actors discourse, revealing their ambiguous position in regard to state government.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
What Lessons Can Be Drawn from Case Studies in France, the United States and Madagascar?
Hugo Carnell

denialism by gaining the trust and cooperation of the affected population. Over the course of its long history, plague has been consistently defined by high mortality, rapid spread and association with poverty. Dangerously, affected populations may prioritise avoiding the stigma of plague over responding to it. If plague conflicts with core cultural values, as with Chinese burial rituals in San Francisco or famadihana in Madagascar, a population with

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Abstract only
Power, resistance and identity in twenty-first-century Ireland
Series: Irish Society
Editors: and

This book analyses and critiques Irish society in the early twenty-first century, but seeks to do so by consciously avoiding myth-making and generalisation. It invites readers to revisit and rethink twelve events that span the years 2001-2009. It shows that all of these events reveal crucial intersections of structural power and resistance in contemporary Ireland. The book shows how the events carry traces of both social structure and human agency. They were shaped by overarching political, economic, social and cultural currents; but they were also responses to proposals, protests, advocacy and demands that have been articulated by a broad spectrum of social actors. The book also explores how power works ideologically and through policy instruments to support dominant models of capital accumulation. Identities are constructed at the interface between public policy, collective commitments and individual biographies. They mobilise both power and resistance, as they move beyond the realm of the personal and become focal points for debates about rights, responsibilities, resources and even the borders of the nation itself. The book suggests that conceptions of Irish identity and citizenship are being redrawn in more positive ways. Family is the cornerstone, the natural, primary and fundamental unit group of society. Marriage is the religious, cultural, commercial, and political institution that defines and embeds its values. The book presents a 2004 High Court case taken by Katherine Zappone and Ann Louise Gilligan for legal recognition of their marriage as a same-sex couple, which had taken place a year previously in Canada.

Kate McLuskie
and
Kate Rumbold

place this ends-driven vision of ‘cultural value’ in binary opposition to the ‘intrinsic’ value of culture. The reality, of course, is much more complex, not least because of the multiple roles that governments simultaneously have to play in relation to culture. Governments navigate the paradoxes of whether their role is to manage the democratic mass distribution of culture, or to protect the arts from

in Cultural value in twenty-first-century England
Abstract only
Kate McLuskie
and
Kate Rumbold

The account of cultural value provided by ministerial statements and groups of arts enthusiasts gives some indication of the difficulties involved in arriving at a stable definition of cultural value in twenty-first-century England. The value of selected examples of culture can be asserted, but the processes of evaluation in each case depends either on a consensus about the value

in Cultural value in twenty-first-century England
Kate McLuskie
and
Kate Rumbold

. The discussion rehearsed familiar starting points for the discussion of cultural value. Cultural value was assumed to be located in the personal or collective experience of those who engaged with it: it could be a product of creative work (with music or ceramics, especially in the hands of children) but cultural experiences also included engagement with particular exemplars of culture (an Ottoman

in Cultural value in twenty-first-century England
Abstract only
Film policy and film distribution
Bridgette Wessels
,
Peter Merrington
,
Matthew Hanchard
, and
David Forrest

spectrum as a popular commercial leisure activity that generates economic value for the UK film industry and, at the other end, as an enriching artistic activity with cultural value for individuals and wider society. To examine how this plays out in the ways that specialised film exhibition is supported in the regions, this chapter begins by introducing the breadth of different types of film and how they are valued, both economically and culturally. This is considered by looking in detail at the idea of ‘cultural cinema’, and traits of mainstream

in Film audiences